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Grammar

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1985
The Times' headline writer may be quicker at writing than at perceiving. In her guest editorial ("Looking Back at High School: Band Was Great But Grammar Was Lost," June 16), Nina Manzi emphasizes that at Clairemont High School she and others were encouraged to "learn the intricacies of the English language through practice in weekly essays, to be language's masters and not its slaves." On her and others who cared, grammar was not lost. As one of the teachers who reveled in the pleasure of working with this student, I rush to defend both her report and the school's reputation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
AUSTIN, Texas -- As the South by Southwest music festival nears its end, quiet begins to beckon. It's the natural result of having been assaulted by noise -- in clubs and concert halls, but also simply walking down many streets here -- for four long days in a row. Eventually, inevitably, the ear requires relief. I found some Friday night, on the next-to-last evening of full programming at SXSW, in performances by London Grammar and Mark Kozelek. The latter show offered another welcome element: somewhere to sit. A young British trio that's already achieved big success at home, where it was nominated last month for a prize at the U.K.'s Grammy-equivalent Brit Awards, London Grammar plays hushed, electronic-edged love songs that can suggest Dido fronting the xx. And it was working hard in Austin to bring some of that buzz to an American audience, with five gigs over the course of four days, including a slot opening for Coldplay.
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SPORTS
August 21, 1986
Oops! Last time I taught grammar, the past participle of hang was hung when used with inanimate objects. Only humans, like yourself, should have their heads hanged in shame. BONNIE M. WEINSTEIN Sherman Oaks
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
The highest compliment I ever paid an editor was to say that she had changed the way I think about commas. That may not sound like much, but it was revolutionary to me. Commas, punctuation, good grammar -- these are precision tools, designed for clarity. If you're a writer, they're all you have. But no ... not only if you're a writer; they are also essential if you want to accurately express your thoughts. As Fiona Maazel observes in a terrific little essay for the Millions : “On the spectrum of world problems that need bemoaning, is bad grammar really one of them?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1997
Now that most of the polemics have died down about the proposed teaching of Ebonics in our schools, I would like to throw in my two cents. I am a teacher, black and most definitely against the use of Ebonics in any school system. I have been living in Europe for the past 10 years and could never imagine the English teaching other English through the use of Cockney, or the French through Titi Parisian. One thing that they do do in Europe, that we don't, is teach grammar. I know many Americans would say that is not true, but until tenses are taught to every student in the United States, there will always be confusion as to what to do with the English language.
OPINION
May 14, 2002
After having read the opinions on the use of the word "like," I'd like to mention another annoying issue concerning grammar (Commentary, May 5, and letters, May 9). Since when have the words "me" and "him" become subjects of a sentence, such as, "Me and him saw the whole thing"? At one time scriptwriters used this ploy to indicate that a character was uneducated or crude, but now you hear our smartest teenagers saying, "Me and him applied to Yale." You hear it in commercials, TV programs, movies and news interviews.
NEWS
August 7, 1995 | Jack Smith
Our new dog, Lili, the Doberman pup, is incorrigible. She scoops up socks, shoes, panties and anything else loose and dashes through the house with them, defying my wife and me to grab them out of her maw. "Snatch it out of her mouth and hit her with it!" I keep shouting at my wife, who is madly but unsuccessfully chasing the dog about. "I can't catch her!" she screams in frustration. I am even more frustrated than she, being unable to jump up and run after the dog.
NEWS
August 22, 1986 | JOHN TAGG
Life is full of paradoxes, real and imagined. One of them is that, having living with paradoxes for however long we've lived, many of us are nonetheless surprised when introduced to a new one. Thus I fully expect that many people will be shocked when I state a paradox that besets the efforts of schools and teachers to promote genuine literacy: One of the greatest enemies of real literacy education in our schools is the systematic teaching of English grammar. The grammar lobby has a long history.
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | MARY LAINE YARBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Mary Laine Yarber teaches English at Santa Monica High School
People constantly call me to double-check the grammar in their academic, personal and business writing. Over the years I have noticed that some kinds of grammar, punctuation and usage rules cause more angst and confusion than others. So I have compiled a rundown of some of the most common problems and the keys to their mysteries. Homonyms (words that sound alike but have different meanings) are troublesome, especially it's and its, you're and your, who's and whose, and they're, their and there.
OPINION
April 4, 1999
Now I know why the lower grades are no longer called grammar school. HANNAH OMAN Culver City
OPINION
August 8, 2012
Re "OMG! Texting ruins kids' grammar," Business, Aug. 4 Your article on the ill effects of texting on grammar contains an unwitting error that exemplifies another issue in language: the need for broader knowledge and appreciation of words. The article states that a sentence used in the grammar test - "Worried, and frayed, the old man paced the floor" - is incorrect because "frayed" should be "afraid. " In fact, one proper meaning of "frayed" is "afraid. " The two words are related.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2011 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
Priscilla Castro grew up enthralled with French culture despite understanding few words of the movies and music in which she delighted. Now Castro's facility with Spanish, which her family spoke at home, is serving as an unlikely bridge to mastering le Français in a unique Cal State Long Beach program designed to exploit Spanish speakers' existing language skills. "I'm not 100% fluent, but I can hold a conversation," said Castro, 21, a journalism major. "A lot of things in Spanish are very similar, although because I learned Spanish at home, I didn't know a lot of the grammatical rules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Katherine Siva Saubel, an elder of the Cahuilla Indian tribe of Southern California, once described herself as "just a voice in the wilderness all by myself. " She meant that she had few people with whom she could speak the Cahuilla language or sing the songs that conveyed her people's ancient stories. "My race," she told The Times in 2000, "is dying. " Now Saubel, long its feistiest guardian, has died. "It's a huge loss … the end of an era," said Nathalie Colin, an ethno-historian at the Malki Museum near Banning, which Saubel co-founded more than 45 years ago to preserve Cahuilla history and traditions.
SPORTS
October 20, 2011 | Eric Sondheimer
In an era when families are torn over what schools to attend and what sacrifices are needed to succeed academically and athletically, the Hilinski brothers have embraced their life of long-distance traffic-congested car pools and early morning wake-up alarms. It started two years ago when Kelly Hilinski was a tall, gangly eighth-grade quarterback living in Claremont. His parents, Mark and Kym, went to great lengths to research what high school he should attend, because his younger brothers would one day follow.
OPINION
August 21, 2011
The Times does its best to catch its own typos and grammatical errors before a paper goes to print or a story is posted online; when we come up short, readers tend to let us know. But what happens if a source quoted in a story commits a linguistic faux pas? Gene Axelrod of Huntington Beach was reading Tony Barboza's front-page story Monday about dangers at Yosemite National Park when he reached this quote from Gov. Jerry Brown describing his reaction to a child standing near the edge of a steep drop-off in the park: " 'It made me shake just looking at him. It's dangerous," Brown told the Associated Press.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
The ramblings of accused Arizona killer Jared Lee Loughner are difficult to tie to a coherent political philosophy, yet in them can be discerned a number of themes drawn from the right-wing patriot and militia movements, experts said. Analysts on the left and the right have debated Loughner's disjointed Internet and YouTube postings, each finding fodder to blame the other for inspiring the 22-year-old. Most wind up concluding that Loughner suffered from mental problems. But experts said that several oft-repeated phrases and concepts ?
NATIONAL
January 12, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
The ramblings of accused Arizona killer Jared Lee Loughner are difficult to tie to a coherent political philosophy, yet in them can be discerned a number of themes drawn from the right-wing patriot and militia movements, experts said. Analysts on the left and the right have debated Loughner's disjointed Internet and YouTube postings, each finding fodder to blame the other for inspiring the 22-year-old. Most wind up concluding that Loughner suffered from mental problems. But experts said that several oft-repeated phrases and concepts ?
NEWS
December 6, 1987
"Wiseguy" is a wonderful, entertaining show. Ken Wahl and Jonathan Banks are totally convincing, as was guest Ray Sharkey. It is intelligently written, actually using correct grammar while making good arguments for right and wrong. Each episode has been terrific, but Sonny's (Sharkey) farewell on Nov. 12 was exceptional. We look forward to a very long run. Cathy Matt, Newport Beach
NATIONAL
January 8, 2011 | By Scott Kraft and Mark Porubcansky, Los Angeles Times
Until Saturday morning, Jared Lee Loughner was a sometime community college student who had attended high school in northwest Tucson, lived with his parents there in a quiet, working-class neighborhood of ranch homes and had recently posted several rambling messages on YouTube. Now, the 22-year-old is in police custody, the chief suspect in a shooting rampage 10 minutes from his house that left six dead and 12 wounded, including U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.), the apparent target of the attack, who remained in critical condition.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
Jared Lee Loughner, the 22-year-old suspect in the Tucson shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) and 17 others, left behind a series of rambling YouTube videos in which he speaks of mind control, dreaming and a "new currency. " He doesn't appear in any of the videos. Instead, the five clips he apparently posted since October under the screen name Classitup10, feature scrolling text on a black screen and diagrams attempting to explain his theories on obscure subjects.
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