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Grammy Awards

ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1993
"I just feel incredibly guilty. The one person I want to thank is my son for the love he gave me and the song he gave me." Eric Clapton, accepting the record of the year award, his sixth award of the evening. * "I hope this puts to rest another rumor that's been in the press for years. . .Me and Janet really are two different people." Michael Jackson hugging sister Janet. * "May I take the time to put an end to another rumor. We are two different people."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Can the biggest Grammy news in jazz come from outside of its own category? While the 55th Grammy Awards stuck to something of a familiar script with some of its honorees, jazz pianist Robert Glasper made the biggest headlines by taking home a surprise win in the R&B category, besting albums by R. Kelly, Anthony Hamilton, Tamia and Tyrese. Backed by his band the Experiment, Glasper freely drew from multiple genres outside of jazz on the Grammy-winning "Black Radio," which featured guest turns from Erykah Badu, King and Lupe Fiasco.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1992
GENERAL Record of the year: "Unforgettable," Natalie Cole (producer, David Foster). Album of the year: "Unforgettable," Natalie Cole. Song of the year: "Unforgettable," Irving Gordon. New artist: Marc Cohn. POP Pop vocal performance, female: "Something to Talk About" (single), Bonnie Raitt. Pop vocal performance, male: "When a Man Loves a Woman" (single), Michael Bolton. Pop performance by a duo or group with vocal: "Losing My Religion" (single), R.E.M.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | From Times wire services and
Singer-songwriter Tracy Chapman and vocal gymnast Bobby McFerrin led the nomination list for the 31st annual Grammy awards today, with six for Chapman and five for McFerrin. Chapman, whose self-titled debut album was a surprise hit in 1988, was nominated for her record "Fast Car," among other nominations. McFerrin, whose "Don't Worry, Be Happy" was the first song without instrumental accompaniment to reach the No.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1993 | JOHN HENKEN
"More music by dead guys" seemed to be the theme of the classical Grammy Awards. We're used to the idea that most of the repertory comes from the deceased, but this year Leonard Bernstein (d. 1990) and Vladimir Horowitz (d. 1989) captured major awards for performance. Even the best contemporary composition award went to Samuel Barber (d. 1981), as the voting went retrospective with a vengeance.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1993 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The balloting in the country categories echoed the country-music industry's exiling of a generation of singers who established their careers before about 1985. In the quest for ever younger, more photogenic performers, the industry has turned its back on such country kings and queens as George Jones, Waylon Jennings, Merle Haggard and Emmylou Harris, despite excellent work from each in recent years.
NEWS
March 3, 1988 | ROBERT HILBURN, Times Pop Music Critic
Irish rock band U2's socially conscious "The Joshua Tree" was named album of the year Wednesday night in the 30th annual Grammy Awards ceremony. In a nationally televised program at Radio City Music Hall, the quartet, however, was blocked in its attempt to become only the eighth record act ever to win both best album and single record awards in the same year.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1994 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
There were some nice awards and one swell music number after another, topped by jazz-singing Natalie Cole and a warm, moving tribute to Curtis Mayfield. There were some impressive statistics: two Tonya Harding-Nancy Kerrigan jokes, two Lorena Bobbitt jokes, one Michael Jackson joke. In addition, nine winners thanked God, and Steven Tyler of Aerosmith asked God to bless rock 'n' roll.
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