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Grand Canyon

NATIONAL
October 18, 2012 | By John M. Glionna
Researchers in Grand Canyon National Park have discovered a prehistoric-looking sucker fish once thought to be extinct from the area. The fish, known as the razorback sucker, is the first of its species to be caught in the Grand Canyon in more than 20 years. The fish is characterized by a long, high sharp-edged hump behind its head. The creature was snagged by Arizona fish and wildlife officials in the Colorado River last week, in the lower part of the canyon system. So is this find one of those river monsters featured on cable television?
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NEWS
November 11, 1993 | Associated Press
A 24-year-old tourist slipped and fell to his death while posing for a picture above the Grand Canyon, the fifth fatal fall since April, officials said. The accident occurred Tuesday at the canyon's south rim. The man's name was being withheld until relatives could be notified.
SCIENCE
August 30, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
While climate scientists fret over the melting of Greenland's ice sheet, a geographer using NASA data made it disappear, revealing a canyon as long as Arizona's Grand Canyon, buried a mile below the ice. At 460 miles long, the chasm bests the Grand Canyon, but its deepest stretches -- 2,600 feet -- are only about half that of the grand gorges carved by the Colorado River. The unnamed canyon runs from roughly the center of the island north to the Petermann Glacier fjord. Evidence indicates that the canyon predates the ice sheet by at least 1 million years, according to a study published this week in the journal Science.
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
How to take a white-water trip through the Grand Canyon without getting wet: Stay home and click on Google's Street View of the classic 286-mile ride on the Colorado River. It's red-rock heaven all the way, with pull-offs that scramble up side canyons too, in the latest take-you-there visuals debuting Thursday (today) on Google Maps. Google's take-you-there 360-degree Street Views (no, they aren't changing the name to "river views") have captured major landmarks like the Burj Khalifa tower in Dubai, the Taj Mahal in Agra, India, and the Eiffel Tower in Paris as well as five national parks in California.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
This weekend you will be able to step onto the rim of the Grand Canyon, hold onto the railing and look down -- without leaving Southern California. Chalk artist Tracy Lee Stum, who creates 3-D images that are crazy-realistic, will bring the natural wonder to life on a section of the Third Street Promenade in Santa Monica. The image will be arranged "so that when people are looking over the railing of the chalk art, it will feel like they are really leaning over the edge of the canyon ," Sherry Henry, director of the Arizona Office of Tourism, said in a statement.
SPORTS
January 31, 1995 | MIKE HISERMAN
Cal State Northridge hit rock bottom Monday night, sent there by an NCAA Division II school with an appropriate name. Grand Canyon, from the same conference Northridge left five years ago, downed the Matadors, 88-82, before 329 at Northridge. Horacio Llamas scored 26 points and Tyrome Finney added 19 for Grand Canyon, which shot 58.9%. Eric Gray and Shane O'Doherty each scored 18 points for Northridge, which also got 17 points and 10 rebounds from Peter Micelli.
TRAVEL
October 6, 2002
Rosemary McClure's article, "All Aboard for a Grand Canyon Getaway" (Weekend Escape, Sept. 22), caused me to marvel at our different perceptions. My friend and I had no complaints about the Grand Canyon Railway package we took in July. Yes, the meals at Max & Thelma's Restaurant are heavier than most health-conscious people prefer, but we walked off the extra calories by heading into historic Williams on Route 66.
NEWS
November 21, 1995 | Associated Press
The Grand Canyon is open to visitors again. The tollbooths, scenic overlooks and souvenir shops opened first thing Monday morning, ending a shutdown that was the first in the park's 76-year history. Motels and cafeterias were back in business, and hikers were allowed onto a network of backcountry trails.
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