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REAL ESTATE
March 27, 1988
Completion of the first phase of the $150-million, 17.3-acre Irvine Plaza at the northwest corner of Von Karman Avenue and Main Street in Irvine, is scheduled for the first quarter of 1989. The first phase will have two buildings with 285,500 square feet of space, according to a spokesman for the developer, Hillman Properties, Newport Beach. The architect is Gensler & Associates, Irvine. One building will have 4 stories, while the other will have 5.
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OPINION
August 29, 2002
Re "Courts Face Closures, Job Cuts," Aug. 27: I don't get it. We will have to close 29 courtrooms and lay off 168 employees. So why did we have to spend more than $90 million on the Chatsworth courthouse? It's an extravagant building that wasted lots of money for expensive granite yet contains too few (only eight) tiny courtrooms for the space it occupies and the money it cost. So where are the logic and the planning? Stephany Yablow Sherman Oaks
REAL ESTATE
October 18, 1987
The 24-story Wilshire Landmark in West Los Angeles can look forward to a $100-million sibling. A companion building, the 17-story Landmark II will be built directly across the street at 11766 Wilshire Blvd. Ground breaking is scheduled Wednesday. The Wilshire Landmark was opened in September, 1986. Both buildings are developments of Homart Development Co., part of the Sears financial network. Christopher T.
SPORTS
February 25, 2010
Stone (or rock): Made of 42 pounds of Scottish granite. Curl: The way a stone "curls" into place with a highly finessed spin. Clockwise to the right; counterclockwise . . . well, take a guess. End: Like an inning, except there are 10. Hammer: The last shot. A huge deal in curling, it goes to the team that didn't score. Button: The bull's-eye. Closest stone scores one point. If you have two stones closer than any of your opponent's stones, you get two points, etc. House: The green circle.
MAGAZINE
May 9, 1993
We in real estate got a kick out of your definitions, but you missed a few. Opt: An overpriced turkey, usually an overimproved house in a so-so neighborhood. La vista tanque farme : A property with soaring, panoramic views of largely industrial areas. Pinata : A home painted with gaudy colors. Gilded Turnip: A home of poor-quality construction with or without a bad add-on or remodel, that the owners have tried to dress up with fancy fixtures and expensive marble or granite touches.
REAL ESTATE
February 9, 1986
Construction has started on what is expected to be a $240,000 renovation and restoration of the garden at El Alisal, the Charles F. Lummis home at 200 E. Ave. 43, a familiar landmark in Highland Park. The initial phase--removal of pathways and their replacement with decomposed granite walkways--has been funded by a grant from the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, according to Betty Marsh of the Historical Society of Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1985 | United Press International
The Pet Rock, a big selling but somewhat nutty novelty item of 10 years ago, is back--as a home video "rock" star. At least this time the piece of granite does more than lie in a gift box, where it didn't need much attention or care and amused friends by obeying such commands as "play dead," and "stay."
REAL ESTATE
June 14, 1987
A spring completion is scheduled for the $65-million, 12-story Warner Corporate Center under construction near the southeast corner of Victory Boulevard and Canoga Avenue in Woodland Hills. The Warner Center office building by Torrance-based LAMCO will have 251,840 square feet of office space, according to John Long, president of LAMCO.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2011 | By Darrell Satzman
A luxurious fortress of concrete, glass and steel presents an imposing profile near the end of a winding drive high above the Sunset Strip. Designed by Santa Monica architect David Lawrence Gray and completed in 1996, the three-level contemporary home sits along the spine of narrow promontory with unobstructed views that stretch from the San Gabriel Mountains to the Getty Center. Dramatic flourishes abound — nowhere more so than in a jutting backyard that feels as though it is suspended above the city.
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