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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1997 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As if to confirm that there is artistic life outside the fine arts scene, the exhibition called "Talk to Me" showcases the wares of graphic artists as well as the stylish dinner-ware of Larry Nicola. Too often, we have entirely different frames of reference for art displayed in a gallery setting and for commercial art. The former is to be savored, we're trained to believe, while the latter deserves only a cursory examination.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
Although surpassed in popularity by social media, campaign posters continue to serve as a fundamental, democratic form of expression used by grass-roots organizers and artists to convey a message for social change. "Decades of Dissent," a collection of 28 silk-screen protest posters from 1960 to 1980 on view at the Skirball Cultural Center, offers a historical perspective of one of the most volatile periods of California politics illustrated through this graphic art form. Topics featured in the posters include women's issues, gay rights, immigration reform, union empowerment and disillusionment with an unpopular war - issues that have hardly disappeared this election season.
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OPINION
October 20, 1996
Re "Effects Firms Decry Lack of Arts Education," Oct. 13: I have been an art teacher for almost four decades and am proud to say I have not missed a single day of teaching since I started in February 1960. I am almost certain that if I remained another 10 years the battle would still be the same. During that time I have witnessed some of the least supportive politicians, community persons, school administrators and parents for a subject that has had to continually justify its mere existence, let alone dollars spent.
NEWS
October 25, 2005 | Bill Becher
Two in a Red Canoe Our Journey Down the Yukon Megan Baldino and Matt Hage Graphic Arts Books: 120 pp., $18.95 * If made into a movie, this true account of a couple's three-month paddle down the Yukon River would be a chick flick. On her first week as a TV news reporter in Alaska, Megan Baldino, an attractive self-described city girl, meets photojournalist and rugged outdoor guy Matt Hage. Dating in Alaska apparently involves rock climbing and cross-country skiing instead of dinner and a movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
Although surpassed in popularity by social media, campaign posters continue to serve as a fundamental, democratic form of expression used by grass-roots organizers and artists to convey a message for social change. "Decades of Dissent," a collection of 28 silk-screen protest posters from 1960 to 1980 on view at the Skirball Cultural Center, offers a historical perspective of one of the most volatile periods of California politics illustrated through this graphic art form. Topics featured in the posters include women's issues, gay rights, immigration reform, union empowerment and disillusionment with an unpopular war - issues that have hardly disappeared this election season.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1996 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
Matthew Emerson was a little bored last summer. So, when he saw an advertisement in the Costa Mesa High School newsletter looking for students interested in designing a Web site for the school, he designed a prototype. It took him three days. Michael Lawrence, the English teacher at Costa Mesa High School who placed the ad and oversees the Web site project, was impressed. He immediately made Matthew, 13, the lead designer on the Web site, which made its official debut Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1995
There is a grave problem in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Vocational training in the sciences and trades has been severely curtailed. Whereas in the past there has been school training for such careers in graphic arts, metal shops and wood shop, nowadays budget reform has restricted much of these activities. The problem I am concerned about is the lack of funding for graphic arts in the schools. Studies have been made by such people as Harvey R. Levenson, of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo that growth in the graphic arts industry is tremendous.
NEWS
November 15, 1990
The Conejo Valley Art Museum opens Friday with an exhibit titled "Chasing the Line" by Claire Falkenstein. For Falkenstein, a major California artist best known for her metal works, this exhibit is like no other she has done before. "This will be the first time I have had an exhibition with graphics playing the dominant part of the display," she said. Falkenstein, 81, is best known for her metal sculptural webs, suggestive of molecular structure and biological growth patterns.
NEWS
February 27, 1994 | JAKE DOHERTY
Bresee Youth Design, a new desktop publishing service, gives kids a chance to use their creative talents to make their mark in the business world instead of on walls, signs or buses. Established last month as a project of the Bresee Youth Center, the business offers a range of design, layout and paste-up, typesetting and printing services for flyers, brochures, business cards, posters, resumes, stationery and more.
NEWS
July 8, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pasadena Unified School District and local graphic arts firms are set to begin an apprenticeship program to teach graphic arts skills to high school students. The agreement, which is expected to be approved formally by the school board Tuesday, calls for establishing a Graphic Arts Academy at Pasadena High School in September, 1991, said John Porter, director of the district's secondary instruction.
BOOKS
May 5, 2002 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to the Book Review, is the author of, most recently, "The Woman Who Laughed at God: The Untold History of the Jewish People."
The very first story in "The Republic of East L.A.," a collection of short fiction by Luis J. Rodriguez, opens with the arresting image of a limousine parked at a curb in Boyle Heights, one of the byways of the barrio that Rodriguez calls "East Los." The limo, a universal symbol of wealth and privilege, is seemingly out of place in a neighborhood that shelters the poor and powerless.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2002 | SUSAN PARROTT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The gore, sportsmanship and pure daring of bullfighting is captured in fine detail in Francisco de Goya's early 19th century etchings. But the black-and-white prints seem even more vivid displayed against a wall of crimson red, curved like a bullring and stained like the blood of a thousand matadors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Memo to Kinko's: The Viking Zone wants to snare some of your business. Like those bigger, better-known companies, the Viking Zone at James Monroe High School in North Hills has all the trappings of a full-service copy business. The project at Monroe and four other high schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District is funded by a $7.4-million, three-year grant from the U.S. Department of Education to establish after-school centers that serve students and the community.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2001 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer
It doesn't take a trip to an art museum to see the work of Milton Glaser. During his 50-year career as a graphic designer, Glaser, 72, has created some of pop culture's most recognizable icons.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2001 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the popular imagination, politicians and advertising agents rank right up there with lawyers and used-car salesmen as people who make a living by deceiving the rest of us. More often than not, contemporary artists are treated with equal suspicion: as charlatans who can't be trusted, much less respected. "Just Another Poster?: Chicano Graphic Arts in California" turns these and other stereotypes inside out.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1997 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As if to confirm that there is artistic life outside the fine arts scene, the exhibition called "Talk to Me" showcases the wares of graphic artists as well as the stylish dinner-ware of Larry Nicola. Too often, we have entirely different frames of reference for art displayed in a gallery setting and for commercial art. The former is to be savored, we're trained to believe, while the latter deserves only a cursory examination.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1997 | BARBARA MURPHY
Holden Color Inc., a commercial printing firm in Newbury Park, has received the Gold Award from the Graphic Arts Management Assn., an affiliate organization of the Printers Industry Assn. of Southern California. The award was for the company's "Holden Boys" campaign, a four-part mailer sent in January as an invitation to Holden Color's open house the following month. Holden Color competed for the award with other printers throughout the Los Angeles area.
MAGAZINE
December 29, 1985 | MIV SCHAAF
Now that the holidays are upon us, merrily we turn our thoughts to festive food. So all the magazines tell us. As far as food goes, I don't turn merrily so much as warily. Aside from my utter incompetence, the trouble is that I pay attention to the festive first and the food second. The actual preparation of food is reluctantly brought to heel, so to speak, in the wake of all sorts of decorative ideas; they're the fun part, after all.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1997 | BARBARA MURPHY
Holden Color Inc., a commercial printing firm in Newbury Park, has received the Gold Award from the Graphic Arts Management Assn., an affiliate organization of the Printers Industry Assn. of Southern California. The award was for the company's "Holden Boys" campaign, a four-part mailer sent in January as an invitation to Holden Color's open house the following month. Holden Color competed for the award with other printers throughout the Los Angeles area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1996 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
Matthew Emerson was a little bored last summer. So, when he saw an advertisement in the Costa Mesa High School newsletter looking for students interested in designing a Web site for the school, he designed a prototype. It took him three days. Michael Lawrence, the English teacher at Costa Mesa High School who placed the ad and oversees the Web site project, was impressed. He immediately made Matthew, 13, the lead designer on the Web site, which made its official debut Monday.
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