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NEWS
July 8, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pasadena Unified School District and local graphic arts firms are set to begin an apprenticeship program to teach graphic arts skills to high school students. The agreement, which is expected to be approved formally by the school board Tuesday, calls for establishing a Graphic Arts Academy at Pasadena High School in September, 1991, said John Porter, director of the district's secondary instruction.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Forget about tea and sympathy. How about tea and morphine? Each of the opium wars launched by France and Britain in 19th century China was less a war on drugs than a war for drugs. The imperialist adventurers were after tea and morphine, and they got what they were after. Morphine is an opiate, tea is loaded with caffeine. The thirst for both was strong in the West, and the East was their common source. A modest but absorbing print exhibition drawn from a promised gift to the UCLA Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts and newly opened at the Hammer Museum pictures one set of unintended consequences that arose in those drug wars' wake.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1992 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you squinted your eyes, Magoo Boyer looked to be wearing a paisley dress shirt. Upon closer inspection, it was no shirt. It was Boyer's skin, virtually every inch of it tattooed with dragons, flowers and scary faces. Even closer inspection revealed one of the faces to be a snarling dog. This was not a tattoo, however, but Boyer's Chihuahua, Gypsy, who was tucked into the left inside pocket of his leather vest. Still closer inspection revealed a tattoo inside Gypsy's left ear.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Chicago real estate developer Dwight Cleveland has donated over 1,000 vintage movies posters from his collection to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The posters, documenting the studio era of "B" movie filmmaking from the first half of the 20th century, feature a variety of genres including westerns ("The Revenge Rider" and "Heart of the Golden West"), war films ("Friendly Enemies" and "Somewhere in France") and musicals ("Breakfast in Hollywood" and "Girl From Rio")
NEWS
June 19, 1986
A lithograph by Los Angeles artist Marvin Harden has been commissioned by the UCLA Friends of the Graphic Arts to benefit the Grunwald Center for Graphic Arts at UCLA. Harden holds a master of fine arts degree from UCLA and has won awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1983 and an artist's fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1972.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1988 | LEON WHITESON
When designer April Greiman's poster "Does It Make Sense" appeared in fall 1986, it was alternately hailed as a radical advance in the art of poster design and condemned as pornographic, self-indulgent and inappropriate.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2001
Theater. The West Coast premiere of "Glimmer, Glimmer and Shine," Warren Leight's tale of twin brothers and former big-band musicians who reconcile after 40 years, closes Sunday at the Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., downtown L.A. Today-Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday 2:30 and 8 p.m; Sunday 7:30 p.m. $30-$44. (213) 628-2772. * Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Forget about tea and sympathy. How about tea and morphine? Each of the opium wars launched by France and Britain in 19th century China was less a war on drugs than a war for drugs. The imperialist adventurers were after tea and morphine, and they got what they were after. Morphine is an opiate, tea is loaded with caffeine. The thirst for both was strong in the West, and the East was their common source. A modest but absorbing print exhibition drawn from a promised gift to the UCLA Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts and newly opened at the Hammer Museum pictures one set of unintended consequences that arose in those drug wars' wake.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1992 | ROSE APODACA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Working as a part of Southern California's surf culture means doing business unconventionally. The pin-striped suit is eschewed, and you don't often "do lunch" to cut a deal. And when Thom McElroy schedules a board meeting, he looks to the ocean for a sign. The Costa Mesa graphic artist certainly does not look for some New Age-inspired omen from nature to conduct business. But if the waves are good, McElroy and his clients bring along a primary tool of their trade: surfboards.
NEWS
October 13, 1988 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
For collectors interested in printing's history, its associated machinery and the field of graphic arts, the International Museum of Graphic Communication in Buena Park, which opened Oct. 4, appears to hold great promise. The 25,000-square-foot facility contains "the world's largest and finest collection of printing machinery," according to the museum's curator, Daniel Streeter. He wrote that it was his hope that the institution, which includes the Ernest E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2012 | Larry Harnisch, Los Angeles Times
Catching up with Ed Fuentes isn't easy. A running start helps. The 52-year-old Fuentes - I call him the human cyclone - moves so fast on so many fronts in any given day that whiplash is possible: photographer, muralist, blogger, modern-day historian, humorist. He briefly touched down in the Arts District last week. But it wasn't that simple, of course. Like one of the Weather Channel's "storm chasers," I tracked him from where he was interviewing a muralist in East Los Angeles to a site just off Alameda Street in downtown L.A., where he had been hired to shoot publicity stills for a local theater company.
IMAGE
March 18, 2007 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
GOODBYE waxed eyebrows, hello mustache wax? On the runways of the fashion capitals and on the streets of Silver Lake, Venice and Brooklyn, designers and young guns alike are staking out a new frontier: a post-metrosexual ruggedness that's all about woolen vests, chambray shirts, crisp-legged denim and manly man belts. Oh, and sporting the kind of facial hair usually seen on a box of Smith Brothers cough drops. Call it Modern Maverick: Western style rendered as cool rather than as costume.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2006 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
When executive producer Vivian Cannon was putting the finishing touches on tonight's new ABC comedy "Emily's Reasons Why Not," she was unsure how to forecast the quirkiness of the show in its crucial opening titles. So Cannon and her colleagues turned to Lynda and Ellen Kahn, two Emmy-award-winning designers (who happen to be sisters) who make their livings creating graphics, logos and titles for TV.
NEWS
October 25, 2005 | Bill Becher
Two in a Red Canoe Our Journey Down the Yukon Megan Baldino and Matt Hage Graphic Arts Books: 120 pp., $18.95 * If made into a movie, this true account of a couple's three-month paddle down the Yukon River would be a chick flick. On her first week as a TV news reporter in Alaska, Megan Baldino, an attractive self-described city girl, meets photojournalist and rugged outdoor guy Matt Hage. Dating in Alaska apparently involves rock climbing and cross-country skiing instead of dinner and a movie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2002 | Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writer
By better synchronizing animation's top prizes with the Academy Awards, the animation industry hopes some of Oscar's luster will shine on Annie. The presentation of the awards -- the animation industry's answer to the Oscars -- will move from its traditional November date to Feb. 1 at Glendale's Alex Theatre, a change that organizers hope will make the Annies a more closely watched prelude to the Oscars.
BOOKS
May 5, 2002 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to the Book Review, is the author of, most recently, "The Woman Who Laughed at God: The Untold History of the Jewish People."
The very first story in "The Republic of East L.A.," a collection of short fiction by Luis J. Rodriguez, opens with the arresting image of a limousine parked at a curb in Boyle Heights, one of the byways of the barrio that Rodriguez calls "East Los." The limo, a universal symbol of wealth and privilege, is seemingly out of place in a neighborhood that shelters the poor and powerless.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Chicago real estate developer Dwight Cleveland has donated over 1,000 vintage movies posters from his collection to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The posters, documenting the studio era of "B" movie filmmaking from the first half of the 20th century, feature a variety of genres including westerns ("The Revenge Rider" and "Heart of the Golden West"), war films ("Friendly Enemies" and "Somewhere in France") and musicals ("Breakfast in Hollywood" and "Girl From Rio")
BUSINESS
August 29, 1988 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
A color photograph of the Newport Beach pier flashed onto a computer screen as a Japanese attendant said, hai, hai wakarimashita (yes, yes I understand) into a telephone in Santa Monica. He pressed a button, and within three minutes the image was electronically transmitted to Toppan Printing Co.'s office in Tokyo. Twenty minutes later the photograph reappeared on the screen, but the pier was gone and in its place were pillars and a silver car.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2002 | SUSAN PARROTT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The gore, sportsmanship and pure daring of bullfighting is captured in fine detail in Francisco de Goya's early 19th century etchings. But the black-and-white prints seem even more vivid displayed against a wall of crimson red, curved like a bullring and stained like the blood of a thousand matadors.
NEWS
January 31, 2002 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I've spent many hours playing with photo-editing software--changing colors, adding decorative borders and designing artistic effects. So I had low expectations for Photowow.com, an online photo imaging and printing services company that also restores, enhances, adds special effects and even frames artistic renderings of customers' photographs. The field has become fairly crowded, as increasing numbers of consumers turn to digital cameras and photo-editing software.
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