Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGraphic Arts
IN THE NEWS

Graphic Arts

BUSINESS
October 28, 1996 | PAUL KARON
In the heart of old Hollywood, not far from Sunset and Vine, up the street from venerable Paramount Studios, near editing facilities and post-production houses and the sorts of companies that will rent you a wind machine or an artificial fog blower, Marc Karzen has achieved mogulhood.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1995 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Graphic arts teacher Joe Ferrell was teaching 1990s students with 1940s tools. He cringed in frustration as student after student left his classroom well-versed in such archaic skills as how to set type by hand, but without the computer skills that could land them jobs in today's high-tech market.
HOME & GARDEN
June 24, 1995 | Cyndi Y. Nightengale
Armoires and entertainment cabinets from Art as Furniture are anything but basic. Adorned with bold graphics and striking handles, they not only hold your television and its accouterments, but the cabinets also function as art pieces in a room. Bob Morrison, founder and owner of Art as Furniture, based in Atlanta, approaches his furniture as blank canvas. "You can put anything on them," says Morrison, whose background is in graphic arts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1995
There is a grave problem in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Vocational training in the sciences and trades has been severely curtailed. Whereas in the past there has been school training for such careers in graphic arts, metal shops and wood shop, nowadays budget reform has restricted much of these activities. The problem I am concerned about is the lack of funding for graphic arts in the schools. Studies have been made by such people as Harvey R. Levenson, of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo that growth in the graphic arts industry is tremendous.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
David Halili isn't bothered by a little controversy. In fact, it has aided his short career as a graphic artist. The first time the 26-year-old Fullerton native realized he was doing something noteworthy was when he saw then-Vice President Dan Quayle and actor Charlton Heston on television holding up examples of his art. But Quayle and Heston were hardly fans. Rather, they were criticizing "Body Count," a hard-rock album by a group led by rap music star Ice-T.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | ANDREW BROWNSTEIN
For the caffeinated legions who see in stereograms nothing more than television static, here's a good place to start: Relax. Open your mind. "You have to let yourself drift," says Tom Baccei, the former hippie who created the images. Another good idea is to practice in private, away from the true believers who will be eager to flaunt their perceptual superiority.
NEWS
February 27, 1994 | JAKE DOHERTY
Bresee Youth Design, a new desktop publishing service, gives kids a chance to use their creative talents to make their mark in the business world instead of on walls, signs or buses. Established last month as a project of the Bresee Youth Center, the business offers a range of design, layout and paste-up, typesetting and printing services for flyers, brochures, business cards, posters, resumes, stationery and more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1993 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you ever drop an intergalactic line to a Klingon, keep in mind that they read from right to left. Romulans, on the other hand, write from the top down. And some other alien languages look suspiciously like a computer flowchart. Of course, this knowledge might come in handy only on those rare occasions when the universal translator attachment to your tricorder is broken.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1993 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These are the trivia of the starship Enterprise . . . If ever you drop an intergalactic line to a Klingon, keep in mind that they read from right to left. Romulans, on the other hand, write from the top down. And some other alien languages look suspiciously like a computer flow chart. Of course, this knowledge might only come in handy on those rare occasions when the universal translator attachment to your tricorder is on the fritz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1992 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you squinted your eyes, Magoo Boyer looked to be wearing a paisley dress shirt. Upon closer inspection, it was no shirt. It was Boyer's skin, virtually every inch of it tattooed with dragons, flowers and scary faces. Even closer inspection revealed one of the faces to be a snarling dog. This was not a tattoo, however, but Boyer's Chihuahua, Gypsy, who was tucked into the left inside pocket of his leather vest. Still closer inspection revealed a tattoo inside Gypsy's left ear.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|