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Graphic Arts

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1995
There is a grave problem in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Vocational training in the sciences and trades has been severely curtailed. Whereas in the past there has been school training for such careers in graphic arts, metal shops and wood shop, nowadays budget reform has restricted much of these activities. The problem I am concerned about is the lack of funding for graphic arts in the schools. Studies have been made by such people as Harvey R. Levenson, of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo that growth in the graphic arts industry is tremendous.
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BUSINESS
January 30, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
David Halili isn't bothered by a little controversy. In fact, it has aided his short career as a graphic artist. The first time the 26-year-old Fullerton native realized he was doing something noteworthy was when he saw then-Vice President Dan Quayle and actor Charlton Heston on television holding up examples of his art. But Quayle and Heston were hardly fans. Rather, they were criticizing "Body Count," a hard-rock album by a group led by rap music star Ice-T.
NEWS
February 27, 1994 | JAKE DOHERTY
Bresee Youth Design, a new desktop publishing service, gives kids a chance to use their creative talents to make their mark in the business world instead of on walls, signs or buses. Established last month as a project of the Bresee Youth Center, the business offers a range of design, layout and paste-up, typesetting and printing services for flyers, brochures, business cards, posters, resumes, stationery and more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1993 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you ever drop an intergalactic line to a Klingon, keep in mind that they read from right to left. Romulans, on the other hand, write from the top down. And some other alien languages look suspiciously like a computer flowchart. Of course, this knowledge might come in handy only on those rare occasions when the universal translator attachment to your tricorder is broken.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1993 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These are the trivia of the starship Enterprise . . . If ever you drop an intergalactic line to a Klingon, keep in mind that they read from right to left. Romulans, on the other hand, write from the top down. And some other alien languages look suspiciously like a computer flow chart. Of course, this knowledge might only come in handy on those rare occasions when the universal translator attachment to your tricorder is on the fritz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1992 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you squinted your eyes, Magoo Boyer looked to be wearing a paisley dress shirt. Upon closer inspection, it was no shirt. It was Boyer's skin, virtually every inch of it tattooed with dragons, flowers and scary faces. Even closer inspection revealed one of the faces to be a snarling dog. This was not a tattoo, however, but Boyer's Chihuahua, Gypsy, who was tucked into the left inside pocket of his leather vest. Still closer inspection revealed a tattoo inside Gypsy's left ear.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1992 | DANIEL AKST
The young people with whom David Lance Goines associated back in the Free Speech Movement days here might have been astonished at his cheery description of himself nearly 30 years later as "the handmaiden of industry." It's an old-fashioned notion, redolent of Elihu Vedder and one of his creepy allegorical paintings, maybe with a diaphanously clad maiden named Science instructing a muscled youth, a guy by the name of Industry.
NEWS
August 12, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Kathy Lewis stamps a letter, she really stamps it. Along with the 29-cent variety, she takes rubber stamps to her mail, and not just a cute little ink blot here and there. By the time she's done, the whole envelope is a fanciful artwork, and the poor letter carrier is lucky to find the address.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | ROSE APODACA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Dave Patri and his buddies from the graphic arts department at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo started Split to showcase their art on T-shirts, they sold the goods out of a cardboard box at a sandwich hangout. Since moving Split to Huntington Beach five years ago, Patri and company have been using the boxes to ship their fresh, funky garb. The group of college buddies behind Split has shifted over the years, but original members Scott Van Derripe, 27, and Patri, 26, have remained.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1992 | ROSE APODACA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Working as a part of Southern California's surf culture means doing business unconventionally. The pin-striped suit is eschewed, and you don't often "do lunch" to cut a deal. And when Thom McElroy schedules a board meeting, he looks to the ocean for a sign. The Costa Mesa graphic artist certainly does not look for some New Age-inspired omen from nature to conduct business. But if the waves are good, McElroy and his clients bring along a primary tool of their trade: surfboards.
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