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ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1998 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In feature animation, a "tent pole" is a sequence from a film that's the first to be produced. Two crucial criteria are demanded of such a sequence: It should be able to remain intact no matter what other subsequent changes may occur in shaping the film's overall story line. It should work without the rest of the film in order to wow studio executives, stockholders and whoever else might get a very early peek at a project. That's no small order. "One of the most difficult parts of the process is getting the first sequence into production," says John Lasseter, the Oscar-winning director of the groundbreaking computer-animation hit "Toy Story," and, now, "A Bug's Life," in an interview at Pixar's Northern California studio.
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BUSINESS
October 27, 1998 | LEO SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through the mid-1980s, the idea of founding an institute for the study of Internet Web design was perhaps the furthest thing from Lynda Weinman's mind. Back then, Weinman was a graphic designer, just discovering the capabilities of her first Macintosh computer.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1998 | David Chute, David Chute is an occasional contributor to Calendar
'We are half thinking," says Rex Grignon, one of two supervising animators on the new DreamWorks SKG release "Antz," "that it would be wonderful if one of our characters got nominated for an acting award. Because, really, we are measuring ourselves against live action rather than conventional animation." This is (if you'll pardon the expression) a large statement. Ants are, after all, among the tiniest and the least respected creatures on God's Earth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1998 | KATIE E. ISMAEL and JOSEPH TREVINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A group of Los Angeles high school students guided nearly 100,000 younger pupils through a printing exhibit at the Los Angeles County Fair. But when the 17-day fair experience ended Sunday, it was the students who had learned the most. Eighteen students from Manual Arts High School and 12 from Wilson High were back in their regular classes Monday after conducting hands-on demonstrations at the Pomona fair for elementary and junior high students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1998 | DIANE WEDNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Transporting 210 students to the Getty Center for a daily arts program would have posed a distinct challenge to Grover Cleveland High School's staff, had the issue come up. Fortunately, the museum floated a simpler proposition: Bring the Getty to the Reseda students.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1998 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Having a good printer is half the battle in adding pizazz to your business presentations, signage and correspondence. You also need graphics software and a source for "clip art." The demand for business-oriented graphics has prompted a couple of software vendors to create special business editions of their popular consumer graphics editing programs.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1998 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Color printers, photo-editing software and graphic tools traditionally have been marketed to home users and graphics professionals. But that's starting to change. Small businesses of all types are finding ways to employ low-cost and easy-to-use graphic solutions to enhance their businesses. I don't have to go any farther than my local ice cream or video store to find evidence of the creative uses of inkjet printers.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1997 | GALI KRONENBERG, Gali Kronenberg is a freelance writer and regular contributor to The Times. He can be reached at gali.kronenberg@latimes.com
This art gallery cost about a billion dollars less to build than the new Getty. But for all of the Getty's sleek modernism, Jon Peterson's site for viewing art is even more cutting-edge. And to visit Peterson's gallery, there's no need to battle crowds, book reservations or board a tram. All one needs to view the work at this virtual gallery is a computer and a modem. "Every artist should have a chance to show their work," says Peterson, an abstract painter and creator of http://www.w3art.com.
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