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HOME & GARDEN
June 30, 2005
Thank you for your article on the California Design Biennial at the Pasadena Museum of California Art ["A Show That's Oh, So California," June 23]. I noticed, however, that none of the pieces you mentioned included the many fine examples of graphic design included in the show. Why do I care? Well, I'm a graphic designer. And I wonder why it is that graphic design gets such short shrift. My going theory is that people can buy and cherish objects like Gideon Dagan's Puzzle wine rack.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
When the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists at the University of Chicago launched a magazine in 1947, its editors turned to artist Martyl Schweig Langsdorf for some cover ideas. The horrors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were still fresh, and the imminent Cold War arms race was heating up. Langsdorf, an abstract painter of some note, had never before done a graphic design (and she never did another). But she knew something about the subject: She was married to physicist Alexander Langsdorf Jr., who had worked on the Manhattan Project, designing the atom bomb.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
Inspiration can come from anywhere. Even a cardboard box company. In 1950, the Container Corp. of America launched an advertising campaign called "Great Ideas of Western Man. " The series, which ran for three decades, paired quotes from leaders in philosophy, science and politics with artwork from modern artists. A new exhibition at the Skirball Cultural Center uses the same technique but focuses on Jewish artists and phrases. "Voices & Visions" features 18 posters inspired by quotations from Jewish authors and scholars.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Sarah St. Lifer
While our living room bookshelves might be getting lighter (every tome under the sun is available via tablet these days!), our kitchen shelves have been getting a bit heavier, thanks to the recent influx of indie cooking magazines. Long live print. Subscriptions typically cost less than a cookbook, but they're just as informative -- often detailing recipes with in-season ingredients and featuring a timely who's who of in-demand chefs.  Here are five indie cooking mag picks, but fair warning: You and your iPad might be spending less time together once the issues start surfacing in your mailbox.
NEWS
December 21, 1986
Graphic designer and film maker Saul Bass, whose works include the symbols and titles for such films as "Vertigo," "Psycho" and "Man with the Golden Arm," has been named a 1986-87 Regents Lecturer at the UCLA department of art, design and art history. Bass teaches a UCLA undergraduate graphic design course and is preparing for a retrospective of his work in 1987. He will give a lecture in conjunction with the exhibit.
NEWS
December 29, 1995
Gerry Rosentswieg, 60, graphic designer who designed and edited several books on his art. He was the owner of the Graphics Studio. Among his books were "Graphic Design Los Angeles," "San Francisco: Graphic Design," "Type Faces," "The New Logo from California" and "The New American Logo." He had been working on books scheduled for release next year, including "The Advertising Art of Coca-Cola."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2002 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Philip B. Meggs, who wrote the first definitive history of graphic and advertising design from the beginning of the written language through the printing press and on to the computer, has died. He was 60. Meggs died of leukemia Nov. 24 in Richmond, Va. A graphic designer for commercial industry and then a college instructor and dean, Meggs said he wrote because of his need to give his students a foundation for all that had gone before.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1990 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Poetic, intuitive and futuristic, April Greiman's graphic designs are in a league of their own. Known for her pioneering computer-generated work, the Los Angeles artist plucks imagery from hither and yon and sprinkles them into commercial posters in editions of hundreds or thousands. Characteristically, they manage to convey useful information at a glance while looking deliciously spacey.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John V. Follis, graphic designer whose signs and symbols included the logos for the Los Angeles Bicentennial and Disney World, has died. He was 71. Follis, who had his own design firm for more than 30 years, died Dec. 4 in Pasadena, his family announced last week. The Los Angeles Chapter of the American Institute of Architects had planned to present Follis with an honorary membership at a luncheon Thursday. The honor was bestowed posthumously.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1998 | KAREN E. KLEIN
When Carol Adams Caley decided to move out of her home office five years ago and establish her graphic design firm in a commercial location, she chose a place where she is surrounded by similar businesses. Instead of being suspicious of the competition, Caley has embraced it and says the creative stimulation, business referrals and camaraderie of working around other designers have improved her company. Caley was interviewed by freelance writer Karen E. Klein.
WORLD
February 27, 2013 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - As the world's oldest subway, better known as the Tube, celebrates its 150th birthday, here's a familiar but gently tweaked reminder: Mind the map. The London Underground is justly famous as a defining feature of the British capital, a wonder of the modern age that whooshes millions of riders around the city every day. But a London institution that may have an even tighter grip on the public imagination is having a birthday too...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2013 | By Cristy Lytal
The artist and graphic designer known as Dickcherry doesn't sport any real tattoos, but he makes temporary ones for characters in the supernatural thriller "Mama," the action movie "The Last Stand," and "Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters. " "I can't even keep a painting that I've created on the wall long enough to even imagine having something on my body for the rest of my life," he said. "But I like the idea and the challenge of creating an image that will look good on human skin and will be a complement to the art form.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
Inspiration can come from anywhere. Even a cardboard box company. In 1950, the Container Corp. of America launched an advertising campaign called "Great Ideas of Western Man. " The series, which ran for three decades, paired quotes from leaders in philosophy, science and politics with artwork from modern artists. A new exhibition at the Skirball Cultural Center uses the same technique but focuses on Jewish artists and phrases. "Voices & Visions" features 18 posters inspired by quotations from Jewish authors and scholars.
NEWS
November 26, 2012 | By Caitlin Keller
Black Sheep Heap is a small design house focusing on projects that promote sustainability. As a member of Green Business Network, the company aims to encourage social and environmental change through their products. In addition to custom graphic design and screen-printing, the Brooklyn-based company produces their own line of hand-printed, organic apparel and recycled bags using water-based, nontoxic inks. The brand's line of unisex t-shirts, onesies and bags sport victory garden-like graphics with catchy taglines that read “Beet the System,” “Avant Gardener” and “Yes We Can.” The t-shirts and bags make great gifts for the avid gardener, food preserver or food activist in your life.
IMAGE
October 14, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - As it gets ready to enter its 10th year, the Band of Outsiders brand has just about become the ultimate fashion insider. In June, founder and creative director Scott Sternberg presented his menswear collection in Paris for the first time - in a live-streamed, 60-hour event billed as "the longest show ever. " The brand's first retail store is being built in Tokyo. And the first lady of the United States, arguably the most high-profile fashion fan in the country, has been spotted in the Boy by Band of Outsiders women's line not once but twice this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2012 | By Jane L. Levere, Special to the Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - The Hungarian-born Bauhaus architect Marcel Breuer once conjured the importance of the building block, that quintessence of child's play, as a route to good design. After receiving an honorary degree from the university in his childhood town of Pécs, he explained: "When children play with building blocks, they discover that they fit together, because they are square.... Then, the child discovers that the blocks are empty, that the sides turn into walls, and that there is a roof and a structure....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
Raymond Wood, a graphic designer best known for creating the pictographs used at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, has died. He was 64. Wood died at his home in Los Angeles on Jan. 1 of pancreatic cancer, according to his wife, Patricia Mace. Over the years, Wood created logos for such products as Kirin Beer, Ryder trucks, Thrifty drugstores, National Car Rental and Fox broadcasting. He also created logos for the California Tourist Board and TreePeople.
BOOKS
March 2, 2008 | Edward Champion, Edward Champion hosts a cultural website at www.edrants.com.
It's a rare affair when a satirical book can be looked at as an objet d'art, and rarer still when the seductive mishmash is offered twice. Legendary book designer Chip Kidd, in his second novel, "The Learners," repeats and evolves the typographical high jinks he gave us in "The Cheese Monkeys." The text is again boxed in by spacious margins. The shouting is again presented in all-caps.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Parks in Los Angeles have always been a peripheral presence, both literally and symbolically. Our major open space has been tucked away in the foothills or mountains, strung along the beaches and coastline. Truly urban parks have been rare here. The $56-million Grand Park in downtown Los Angeles, the first phase of which will open this weekend, is an attempt to rewrite that civic story line, to create -- perhaps for the first time since the heyday of Pershing Square in the years before World War II -- a central gathering spot, in the heart of downtown, for all of dizzyingly diverse L.A. County.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2012 | By David Pagel
“Robert Overby: Paintings and Drawings from the 1970s” takes visitors back to a time when sex was sexy. At Marc Selwyn Fine Art, Overby's nine oils on canvas and four works on paper bespeak an age when sex had more atmosphere than it does today. Although sex seems to suffuse nearly every image we see, its presence has been sanitized and streamlined - cleaned up to boost sales of everything from perfume to pharmaceuticals, phones to French fries. Overby (1935-1993) got a late start in art. Turning to it in 1969, after an award-winning career in graphic design, he worked fast and furiously.
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