Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGravediggers
IN THE NEWS

Gravediggers

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for Cardinal Roger Mahony, cemetery workers at the Los Angeles Archdiocese's 11 cemeteries voted overwhelmingly Tuesday against union representation. The Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union's bid to organize the workers lost 92 to 43. The vote ended one of the most acrimonious chapters in the historically warm relationship between organized labor in the United States and the Catholic Church.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2007 | Martin Rubin, Special to The Times
THERE is a lot to respect and admire about Joyce Carol Oates' fiction. Foremost among her protean talents is the forceful imagination that has leapt out so often and illuminated all manner of situations and characters, some closer to home but often far removed from what must be her actual experience. Then there is the vibrancy and energy of her prose style: always hard-hitting, direct, memorable.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 30, 1985 | Associated Press
A strike by gravediggers and groundskeepers expanded Friday to 19 cemeteries on both sides of San Francisco Bay as dissatisfied employees rejected a proposed 2% wage hike. Representatives for both sides agreed that the strike, which started Thursday, will cause people to search out non-union cemeteries or have bodies stored at funeral homes until the strike is over.
WORLD
September 2, 2005 | Edmund Sanders and Ashraf Khalil, Times Staff Writers
The hospital walls here are papered with photos. It could be New York City after Sept. 11 or Sri Lanka after last year's tsunami. But these are not family snapshots of the missing. These are gruesome images of the found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
The National Labor Relations Board in Los Angeles dealt a blow Tuesday to an organizing campaign aimed at unionizing gravediggers who work at 10 cemeteries operated by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles. "The cemetery operations are integral to the Catholic Church's religious mission and rituals" and therefore outside the jurisdiction of the National Labor Relations Act, said the board in an opinion signed by Regional Director Victoria E. Aguayo.
NEWS
March 17, 1987 | United Press International
Union gravediggers and maintenance workers Monday struck 28 of the 66 Catholic cemeteries of the Archdiocese of Hartford, delaying some burials. The strike by Local 14323 of the United Steelworkers Union began at midnight Sunday when a three-year contract with the Catholic Cemeteries Assn. expired. No new talks were scheduled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1990
The Los Angeles Catholic Archdiocese, which broke off contract negotiations Monday with the union approved by gravediggers at 10 church-run cemeteries, announced Tuesday that an accounting firm will conduct an election Feb. 9 to decide if the 140 cemetery workers still want union representation. However, Dave Werlin, an organizer with the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union, called the new election a "sham."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
More than a hundred Southern California gravediggers and their supporters held a spirited lunch-hour rally Friday in front of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, protesting the refusal of the archdiocese to recognize their union and creating a potentially embarrassing situation for Archbishop Roger M. Mahony, an outspoken supporter of workers' rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1985 | Associated Press
Talks aimed at settling the three-week-old gravediggers strike have collapsed, and burials remain delayed at 19 struck cemeteries on both sides of the bay. Bargaining broke off Friday between 180 gravediggers and the owners of the cemeteries. Bodies were accumulating at the rate of 10 to 20 a day, funeral homes estimated. The strike started March 18.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1990
Saying that 97 gravediggers employed by the Los Angeles Roman Catholic Archdiocese have filed a petition stating that they "no longer want to be represented by the union," Archbishop Roger M. Mahony broke off negotiations Monday with the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union and said he would hold a new election. But Barbara Mejia, Amalgamated's California manager, said the union will not agree to new balloting.
NEWS
April 27, 2003 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
As a gravedigger for Saddam Hussein's regime, Kadem Gatea Sofaieh said there were nights when he found it difficult to sleep, tossing with memories of bodies shot, tortured or beaten. For 10 years, Sofaieh, 54, kept his uneasy secrets -- the sites of several dozen nameless people he buried, many of them victims of the regime. But late last week, he decided it was time to clear his conscience.
NEWS
January 14, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Where is the body of Maurice Bishop? That is Grenada's most haunting and enduring Cold War mystery--and has been since the legendary leftist prime minister was brutally executed, along with about a dozen supporters, in a 1983 government upheaval that triggered the Reagan administration's invasion of this remote Caribbean isle. The invading American troops rounded up and jailed 17 soldiers and insurrection leaders for the killings. But to this day, U.S.
NEWS
August 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
These gravediggers don't stop working--even for the funerals. There are just too many bodies arriving. Laborers hired for about $11 a day hack at the heat-baked soil in a weedy corner of the Bagcesme cemetery. Almost as soon as a grave is completed, another earthquake victim is carried through the iron gates. Hour after hour, the funeral processions creep up the steep hill. Below lies Izmit, a gritty port city east of Istanbul that is the epicenter of Tuesday's deadly quake.
NEWS
March 19, 1995 | MICHAEL STOTT, REUTERS
Prudencia Acosta is one of this small mountainside town's biggest attractions. Dressed in a dark brown shawl and cape, clutching a red carnation in her wizened hands, she stands propped against a wall to receive curious visitors. Prudencia died more than 10 years ago. She is one of San Bernardo's "living dead"--corpses that mummify naturally in their coffins, defying the normal process of decomposition in a phenomenon which has baffled townspeople and drawn hundreds of curious visitors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1993 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Oxnard police prepared to bury one of their own, Patrick Perez and Jose Luis Aguilar went about their work Monday the way they have 100 times before. Shortly before 2 p.m., after police finalized security measures at the Santa Clara Cemetery & Mausoleum, the gravediggers broke the earth where Officer James E. O'Brien will be laid to rest today. "From what I hear, he was a good man," said Perez, who has worked at the Oxnard cemetery for two years. "I hear he was a good cop, a real good cop.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for Cardinal Roger Mahony, cemetery workers at the Los Angeles Archdiocese's 11 cemeteries voted overwhelmingly Tuesday against union representation. The Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union's bid to organize the workers lost 92 to 43. The vote ended one of the most acrimonious chapters in the historically warm relationship between organized labor in the United States and the Catholic Church.
NEWS
January 5, 1989
The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles and the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union announced Wednesday that they have agreed to a Feb. 8 election to determine if the archdiocese's cemetery workers will be represented by the union. The state Mediation and Conciliation Service will conduct the voting by the 140 gravediggers at the archdiocese's 10 cemeteries and supervise the vote count at a church later that day, the announcement said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles fired three gravediggers in the last 48 hours and a union charged that it was part of a campaign by the church to thwart union organizing efforts at the archdiocese's 10 cemeteries. A spokesman for the archdiocese confirmed that the three men had been discharged--one on Thursday and two on Friday--but he denied that the workers had been fired for union activities.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | United Press International
The man who lowered the nation's last four leaders into their graves laid to rest today a rumor that he dropped Leonid I. Brezhnev's corpse. "The sound people heard that day was the sound of the Kremlin clock and a cannon salute," Georgy Kovalenko, gravedigger for Communist VIPs, told the Sobesednik supplement to the Komsomolskaya Pravda newspaper. Ever since Brezhnev was buried Nov. 15, 1982, Soviet citizens have disputed what caused a thud just as the Soviet leader was lowered into the grave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1990 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
Two top Los Angeles labor officials accused Roman Catholic Archbishop Roger M. Mahony on Tuesday of dishonesty and hypocrisy in the wake of his recent decision to stop bargaining with a union that won a hard-fought victory to represent workers at the archdiocese's 10 Los Angeles-area cemeteries. The Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union filed suit in Los Angeles Superior Court on Tuesday, seeking an injunction to force Mahony to resume negotiations on a new labor contract.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|