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HOME & GARDEN
July 18, 2009 | Emily Green
Once you're resolved to use gravel as ground cover, the questions stack up. Where to buy it? How to choose it? How much is enough? Leaving aside glam rock, the best all-around garden choice is usually pea gravel. This term means two things. First, as the name suggests, an individual piece is roughly the size of a pea. Second, when quarry or building supply merchants use it, it is also often the name for a rugged gravel that, at $30 or so a ton, is keenly priced but sharp-edged.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2013 | By Cristy Lytal, Los Angeles Times
The blockbuster Steven Spielberg movie "Jurassic Park," being re-released in 3-D on April 5, wouldn't be the same place without paleontologist Jack Horner. In addition to advising the production on scientific matters, Horner provided inspiration for the character of Dr. Alan Grant in the original 1993 movie. Universal Pictures is preparing to shoot a fourth installment in the "Jurassic Park" series and will once again tap Horner to serve as an advisor. "It's fun to see a lot of the stuff that I do in there," said Horner, curator of the Museum of the Rockies and professor at the University of Montana.
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HOME & GARDEN
April 2, 2011 | By Debra Prinzing, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The overused term "sustainability" has nearly lost its meaning, especially when it comes to gardening. For Stephen Orr , formerly garden editor of House & Garden and Domino magazines, sustainability can be described as "conscientious landscape design," an approach that embodies locale, climate, plants, materials and community. Orr wrote his new book, "Tomorrow's Garden: Design and Inspiration for a New Age of Sustainable Gardening" [ Rodale Books ], to explore the vocabulary and visual expressions of gardens that can be sustained in the future.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Landscape contractor Scott Sohn recalled the day when landscape architect Wayne Connor showed him a pencil sketch and asked for his opinion. “I had to step back and say, 'What the heck is that ?'” Sohn said, chuckling. That was the Bamboo Wave, a key element of a plant-free garden by a guesthouse in Rancho Mirage. In a region where the temperatures hit 120 in the shade, a garden that requires no water and no fried-plant replacement is practical, but practicality was merely a side benefit to the goal here: an unusual design to help the guesthouse entry look and feel different from other parts of a large property.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2001 | CAROL CHAMBERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an outpouring of opposition from residents and city officials, the county Board of Supervisors on Tuesday rejected a proposal to mine 56 million tons of sand and gravel in Soledad Canyon. Citing the project's size and its effect on the environment, the board voted 4 to 0 with Supervisor Gloria Molina absent to deny the project proposed by Transit Mixed Concrete Co., upholding a 1999 decision by the county Regional Planning Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1985 | MIRNA ALFONSO, Times Staff Writer
State legislation that would toughen a law requiring loaded gravel or sand trucks to have a covering was promoted at a San Diego press conference Thursday by State Assemblyman Richard Katz (D-Sepulveda). The proposed bill would make it a misdemeanor, punishable by a $500 fine and up to six months in jail, for uncovered vehicles loaded with sand or gravel to be on a freeway, Katz said. Under an existing law, it is merely an infraction to carry a sand or gravel load without covering it.
NEWS
June 1, 2008 | Katy Pownall, Associated Press
Stephen Batte works in a quarry under the blazing sun, chipping rocks into gravel with a homemade hammer. It's tiring, boring and dangerous. Stephen is 9 years old, and has been on the rock pile since he was 4. "Life has always been hard here," he whispers, carefully positioning a sharp rock before striking it with practiced accuracy. "But since my mother died, things have been much harder." His mother, who taught him to smash rocks, was killed here in a landslide in August.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2013 | By Cristy Lytal, Los Angeles Times
The blockbuster Steven Spielberg movie "Jurassic Park," being re-released in 3-D on April 5, wouldn't be the same place without paleontologist Jack Horner. In addition to advising the production on scientific matters, Horner provided inspiration for the character of Dr. Alan Grant in the original 1993 movie. Universal Pictures is preparing to shoot a fourth installment in the "Jurassic Park" series and will once again tap Horner to serve as an advisor. "It's fun to see a lot of the stuff that I do in there," said Horner, curator of the Museum of the Rockies and professor at the University of Montana.
HOME & GARDEN
December 12, 2009 | By Debra Prinzing
What started as a pile of rubble became a patterned driveway that's not only beautiful but also permeable, meaning winter rains will percolate into the ground instead of spilling into the street. Steve Gerischer, owner of Larkspur Garden Design in Los Angeles, salvaged old brick and broken concrete from job sites to create a floral-inspired tapestry over his 14-by-40-foot driveway in Glassell Park. The driveway had been covered with gravel, but over the years it had mostly become dirt.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Landscape contractor Scott Sohn recalled the day when landscape architect Wayne Connor showed him a pencil sketch and asked for his opinion. “I had to step back and say, 'What the heck is that ?'” Sohn said, chuckling. That was the Bamboo Wave, a key element of a plant-free garden by a guesthouse in Rancho Mirage. In a region where the temperatures hit 120 in the shade, a garden that requires no water and no fried-plant replacement is practical, but practicality was merely a side benefit to the goal here: an unusual design to help the guesthouse entry look and feel different from other parts of a large property.
HOME & GARDEN
April 2, 2011 | By Debra Prinzing, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The overused term "sustainability" has nearly lost its meaning, especially when it comes to gardening. For Stephen Orr , formerly garden editor of House & Garden and Domino magazines, sustainability can be described as "conscientious landscape design," an approach that embodies locale, climate, plants, materials and community. Orr wrote his new book, "Tomorrow's Garden: Design and Inspiration for a New Age of Sustainable Gardening" [ Rodale Books ], to explore the vocabulary and visual expressions of gardens that can be sustained in the future.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2010 | By Kurtis Alexander
Greenhouses once ruled the Pajaro Valley on the Central California coast, where the local cut-flower business found success worldwide. Empty nurseries now dot the area, a sign of the industry's decline. But with the help of plenty of water, Chris Newman, 58, hopes to restore the glory of greenhouses. His tactic is called aquaponics, a combination of aquaculture — fish farming — and hydroponics — growing plants in water. With the help of neighbors and his brother Tom, Newman has converted 14,000 square feet in a former rose-growing facility into a system of stream channels, gravel beds and water pipes where he hopes to soon raise fish and grow vegetables commercially.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
In a couple of hours, the boy named Jasiel would have started the second day of second grade and his parents would have gone off to the multiple jobs they worked just to get by. But with a terrible noise and a choking plume of smoke, their Santa Barbara house collapsed atop them shortly before 7 a.m. Tuesday as a runaway truck finally came to a tragic halt. Buried beneath the rubble of their home and a mountain of gravel being hauled to a construction site, the effervescent 7-year-old and his parents died in the crash that demolished their small rented home at the foot of San Marcos Pass.
NEWS
August 24, 2010 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
A fully loaded gravel truck careened off a highway Tuesday and crushed a house in Santa Barbara, killing a man, woman and child, authorities said. Firefighters are still searching the collapsed house on the 4100 block of State Street for a possible fourth victim, said Santa Barbara City Fire Capt. Gary Pitney. The double tractor-trailer full of gravel was traveling southbound on Highway 154 near an overpass of the 101 Freeway when it collided with four other vehicles, careening down a driveway into a house with as many as four people inside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2010 | By Randy Lewis
Alex Chilton, the mercurial leader of the Box Tops and Big Star who burst from the Memphis music scene in 1967 singing "The Letter" in the smoke-gravel voice of a grizzled soul man even though he was just 16 at the time, has died. He was 59. Chilton was pronounced dead in the emergency room of a New Orleans hospital Wednesday after complaining of shortness of breath and chest pains, longtime friend Pat Rainer said Thursday. The cause of death has not been determined, but Rainer said Chilton's wife, Laura Kerstin, said he appeared to have suffered a heart attack.
NATIONAL
January 31, 2010 | By Sandi Doughton
The fallout from Mt. Rainier's shrinking glaciers is beginning to roll downhill, and nowhere is the impact more striking than on the volcano's west side. "This is it in spades," U.S. Park Service geologist Paul Kennard said recently, scrambling up a 10-foot-high mass of dirt and boulders bulldozed back just enough to clear the road. As receding glaciers expose crumbly slopes, vast amounts of gravel and sediment are being sluiced into the rivers that flow from the region's tallest peak.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1986
I am writing to express my extreme disappointment at the emasculation of Assemblyman Katz's bill that would have required trucks carrying loose rocks or gravel to cover their loads. It is my belief that the problems caused by loose rock and gravel on the state's freeways go beyond the property damage created. There is also a severe safety hazard created by these loads because people are anxious to avoid being behind trucks that are spewing out rocks and sand. This prompts them to speed, make dangerous lane changes or slow down to the point of becoming obstacles to cars coming behind them.
TRAVEL
July 13, 1986
A letter June 15 commented that the road from Torrey to Boulder, Utah, is now paved. But we cannot understand why the AAA ever at any time told Alice Fleischer that this road is not approved for automobile travel. It has long been a safe two-lane gravel road, the only problem being that the gravel can be stones up to four inches thick. And in the spring there might be some muddy spots where snow banks lay on the road. But the only time I can recall driving it and not getting through was in April, 1947, when the snow was too deep.
HOME & GARDEN
December 12, 2009 | By Debra Prinzing
What started as a pile of rubble became a patterned driveway that's not only beautiful but also permeable, meaning winter rains will percolate into the ground instead of spilling into the street. Steve Gerischer, owner of Larkspur Garden Design in Los Angeles, salvaged old brick and broken concrete from job sites to create a floral-inspired tapestry over his 14-by-40-foot driveway in Glassell Park. The driveway had been covered with gravel, but over the years it had mostly become dirt.
OPINION
September 21, 2009
Re "Lawn and order," Sept. 17 "Lawn and order" might be a catchy title and partly descriptive of the landscaping at the new Police Department headquarters, but its greatness is in its use of wonderful beds of low-water and native plants, handsome red-earth gravel walkways, benches to sit on and amazing design. It's worth a trip downtown, where I live, just to see it. Finally someone got something right. But we still are desperate for those million green trees promised by the mayor.
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