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Gray Cary Ware Freidenrich

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BUSINESS
October 21, 1993 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego's largest law firm, Gray Cary Ames & Frye, announced Wednesday that it will merge with Ware & Freidenrich in Palo Alto, the second-largest law firm in Silicon Valley. The new firm--Gray Cary Ware & Freidenrich--will be the state's eighth-largest firm, with 273 attorneys and annual billings of about $80 million. No staff cutbacks are planned, and the two firms will have equal representation on an eight-member executive committee.
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BUSINESS
November 27, 1995
Richard M. Rodstein, president of Anthony Industries Inc., will become chief executive of the Los Angeles-based maker of sporting goods and other products, effective Jan. 1. Rodstein, 41, succeeds B.I. Forester, 67, who remains as chairman of the board. Rodstein has been president of Anthony since 1990, and he retains that post.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2003 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Two world-renowned songwriters and two independent music publishers sued Bertelsmann for $17 billion Wednesday, accusing the German media conglomerate of deliberately helping users of the wildly popular Napster song-swapping service violate millions of copyrights.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2007 | Joseph Menn and Dawn C. Chmielewski, Times Staff Writers
A San Diego jury on Thursday told Microsoft Corp. to pay $1.52 billion for infringing patents underpinning the world's most popular digital music standard, known as MP3. The verdict, one of the largest patent awards on record, could open other technology companies to massive liability. Virtually every portable digital music player uses MP3 technology to read music files, including Apple Inc.'s iPod.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2004 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
As entertainment-industry lawyers urged a federal appeals court Tuesday to rein in the Morpheus and Grokster online file-sharing networks, the company behind Morpheus released a new version of its software that makes it easier for people to copy music and movies. The move by StreamCast Networks Inc. illustrates what is at stake at the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals: how much control copyright holders will have over the distribution of their works.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2003 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
Like frustrated prosecutors charging an acquitted crime boss with tax evasion, the major record labels are suing the creators of the Morpheus file-sharing network again -- not over the software that millions of people use to copy billons of songs for free but over a service that never launched.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1999 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sun Microsystems Inc. moved closer to keeping control of Java, the widely used programming language it developed for the Internet, when a federal judge indicated Tuesday he planned to rule against Microsoft Corp. on a key part of the legal battle between the two companies. U.S. District Judge Ronald Whyte in San Jose wrote that he was planning to rule that Microsoft's Windows 98, Internet Explorer 4.0 and other software violated Sun's copyright for Java.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | SANDY BANKS and KAREN KAPLAN and MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Web site that spread explicit and malicious rumors across Southern California campuses was shut down Friday after sparking an unwelcome explosion of electronic gossip and adolescent angst. On http://www.SchoolRumors.com, middle school, high school and college students--the majority in the San Fernando Valley--posted graphic messages full of sexual innuendo aimed at individual students and focusing on topics such as the "weirdest people at your school."
BUSINESS
December 13, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a real estate broker, Steve Newman routinely saw properties change hands for millions of dollars. Now he's betting that the same thing will happen with the virtual real estate of the World Wide Web. The recent sale of the Internet domain name Business.com for $7.5 million gave Net watchers a glimpse of just how valuable a Web address can be.
NEWS
July 16, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ross Koty has nothing to do with Carl's Jr. He doesn't sell hamburgers, he doesn't make milkshakes and, as far as anyone knows, he's never even uttered the words "Happy Star." But in the ever-widening universe known as cyberspace, Ross Koty is Carl's Jr., a vexing situation that the restaurant chain's lawyers would desperately like to change. Simply by being first to ask for it, Koty sewed up the rights to the carlsjr.com domain, an electronic address on the Internet.
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