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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2002 | George Skelton
SACRAMENTO Gov. Gray Davis won't know for certain until Tuesday night which Republican will be pounding on him this fall. But he already knows his soft spot. And that's energy. Those $43-billion long-term power contracts, in particular, are political losers. Never mind that they helped get California through last summer with air conditioning, while stabilizing the market and forcing down the spot price of electricity. Most voters aren't buying it. They agree with Davis' critics: He purchased too much juice for too many years at too high a cost.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- For years, Gray Davis has told a favorite story about Jerry Brown and his carpet. When Brown was governor in the 1970s, he refused to patch a hole in the carpet of his Capitol office, hoping that his display of frugality would be emulated across state government. Davis, who was Brown's chief of staff before becoming governor himself, got a chance to retell the story in the new issue of Time magazine. He wrote a short article about Brown , one of the publication's 100 most influential people.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2002 | George Skelton
SACRAMENTO It was a simple question I lobbed Bill Simon last May. A softball. Easy to hit. "Are you for the death penalty?" I asked him at a Republican fund-raising event. "I'd rather keep that off the record," the political novice replied. "I am, but I want to come up to speed first before answering on the record." Whoaaa! Here's a conservative who wants to be the Republican nominee for governor, but can't say publicly whether he's for the death penalty? Being pro-execution is a must for any gubernatorial candidate in California, regardless of party.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - After working at the top levels of state government in three administrations, Marty Morgenstern is calling it quits - again. This time, California's outgoing Labor and Workforce Development secretary is stepping down as head of the agency that oversees unemployment insurance, workers' compensation and on-the-job safety. At age 78, he has worked on and off for Gov. Jerry Brown, himself 75 years old. Morgenstern, who will remain an unpaid senior advisor to the governor, distilled his theory of government work to just three sentences: "We never have enough money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2002 | George Skelton
Reporters descended on a state Democratic convention over the weekend to poke at the party's base--to see how firm it is for Gov. Gray Davis. For the last year or two, the political wisdom has been that Davis' support is soft where it should be the strongest, in the Democrats' liberal base. There, left-wingers are frustrated with the governor's centrist policies. He's not behaving like a real Democrat, the cry echoes. Ideologues are so unenthused that they could walk in November and vote for another centrist, Republican Dick Riordan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1993
Picture this. Davis is controller of a large corporation. Business is lousy. The corporation is operating in the red. Controller Davis goes to the president of the corporation and says, "Business is bad, hence I propose creating a new department to tell existing departments how to operate. This should save us a lot of money." Is he serious? In any of the major corporations that I have worked for, such a proposal would have brought forth gales of laughter. Please send this man a definition of the responsibilities of a controller.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Former California Gov. Gray Davis weighed in Tuesday on the cross-country feud between Jerry Brown and Chris Christie, predicting that Brown will easily best the New Jersey governor in a physical fitness contest. “I'm betting on Jerry Brown in his challenge because this guy runs every day -- I work out every day with weights but I can't do chin-ups. He can do chin-ups, he can do push-ups, I'm telling you Christie better go on a crash course because he's doomed for a distant second,” Davis said, standing outside the California delegation hotel on  the opening day of the Democratic National Convention.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez
California is "finally moving in the right direction" in making it easier for new businesses to set up shop in the state, former Gov. Gray Davis told a panel at the annual Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills.  Speaking on what states can do to create jobs, Davis, who was recalled by voters in 2003, said the state had an "arrogant attitude" in the 1970s toward new businesses. "You're lucky if we let you in," Davis characterized the attitude.  Now, the state is trying to streamline the business start-up process and avoid unnecessary delays, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
This is the 10th anniversary week of California's first and only recall of a governor. But no one is celebrating. We replaced a career politician, Democrat Gray Davis, with a Hollywood action hero, Republican Arnold Schwarzenegger. Big mistake. It was like calling in an inexperienced repairman who made things worse and cost us a lot. Yes, he championed a couple of sorely needed political reforms - nonpartisan redistricting of congressional and legislative seats and a top-two open primary system.
OPINION
October 7, 2013 | By Peter Schrag
Monday is the 10th anniversary of the recall of Gov. Gray Davis and the election of Arnold Schwarzenegger. Was it the great watershed in California government that some predicted at the time? Was it a "people's revolution," something like Proposition 13, that would trigger a broader national uprising against politics as usual? Was it the great reengagement of an electorate that had been alienated by the mess our leaders had made of things? Or was the recall none of these things, just a system reset that hardly changed anything?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak
For political roadkill, Gray Davis sounds awfully chipper these days. After decades spent in methodical, often joyless pursuit of higher office, the man who won the governor's office in 1998 was ousted in a recall election that was equal parts carnival and runaway train. He has the distinction of being only the second governor in U.S. history tossed from office midterm. More painful still, Davis' ouster came less than a year after he had scraped his way to reelection. Regrets?
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Former California Gov. Gray Davis weighed in Tuesday on the cross-country feud between Jerry Brown and Chris Christie, predicting that Brown will easily best the New Jersey governor in a physical fitness contest. “I'm betting on Jerry Brown in his challenge because this guy runs every day -- I work out every day with weights but I can't do chin-ups. He can do chin-ups, he can do push-ups, I'm telling you Christie better go on a crash course because he's doomed for a distant second,” Davis said, standing outside the California delegation hotel on  the opening day of the Democratic National Convention.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Scott Walker made history this week in Wisconsin, becoming the first governor ever to successfully beat back a recall attempt. That means in the entirety of these United States just two governors have been yanked from office before their terms expired, Lynn Frazier and Gray Davis. Of the two, just one survives: California's Davis. (Frazier, recalled in North Dakota in 1921, has been largely forgotten, save when people write stories like this one. He was subsequently elected to the U.S. Senate, where as a pacifist and isolationist, Frazier unsuccessfully sought a constitutional amendment outlawing warfare.)
BUSINESS
May 2, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
So much for the idea of West is best. In an annual survey, executives ranked California as the worst place to do business for the eighth year in a row. Chief Executive magazine has only been conducting its survey for eight years. Texas has been top-ranked every year. The survey considered responses from 650 business leaders, who graded states on factors such as taxes, regulations, living environment and more. Texas and second-ranked Florida have the highest migration rates in the nation for 2001 through 2009.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez
California is "finally moving in the right direction" in making it easier for new businesses to set up shop in the state, former Gov. Gray Davis told a panel at the annual Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills.  Speaking on what states can do to create jobs, Davis, who was recalled by voters in 2003, said the state had an "arrogant attitude" in the 1970s toward new businesses. "You're lucky if we let you in," Davis characterized the attitude.  Now, the state is trying to streamline the business start-up process and avoid unnecessary delays, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2011 | By Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
Gov. Jerry Brown reached back through his four decades in public office Wednesday to fill key staff and cabinet posts and replace seven Arnold Schwarzenegger appointees to the State Board of Education. Some of those named held high-level positions in Sacramento when Brown was governor in the 1970s ? upstarts without political experience then, seasoned government hands now. Veterans of the Gray Davis and Schwarzenegger administrations, career state bureaucrats and high-level corporate executives were all in the mix. Brown also gave his wife a top job, without a salary.
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