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Gray Davis

OPINION
December 30, 2010
Is 'I'm sorry' enough? Re "Obama draws fire for comments on Vick," Dec. 29 There are many kinds of bad conduct in professional sports, but the conduct of Michael Vick is extremely shocking stuff. President Obama's recent comments not only lessen the impact of Vick's offense, they also help condone animal cruelty. Has the president actually read or looked at what this talented and well-paid athlete was doing to living creatures, animals unable to defend themselves from the pain and torture they endured?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2010 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
One thing should now be evident as Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger packs up his office: It was a mistake to recall Gray Davis. Davis didn't deserve it. He had just been reelected the year before. He would have been out of office in three years anyway. Schwarzenegger wasn't an improvement except for, briefly, providing entertainment. He didn't make the state's money mess any better. In fact, it has gotten worse. It was not a citizen uprising that dumped Davis, a Democrat. The 2003 recall election was called because one ambitious Republican congressman, Darrell Issa of Vista, spent $1.7 million of his own money to collect the needed signatures.
OPINION
December 27, 2010
The governor leaves office with a budget in desperate shape, but he set a new political course for California. Was the recall worth it? Is California better off for having ousted Gov. Gray Davis in 2003, just after reelecting him to a second term, and replacing him with perhaps the most unlikely of governors, movie action hero Arnold Schwarzenegger? It's a question that has been asked a lot over the last several months as Schwarzenegger winds down his second term, with California's finances in the worst shape since the Depression and his approval rating lower than Davis' was at its nadir.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2010 | By Shane Goldmacher, Los Angeles Times
It'll be a little more upscale than the impromptu dinner at a Chinese restaurant where Jerry Brown celebrated his first swearing-in as California governor three decades ago ? but maybe not by much. Brown, who takes back the office on Jan. 3, won't be holding an extravagant inaugural ball and raising eye-popping sums to fund it as the last few incoming governors have done. His party will be a decidedly modest affair. Special interests eager to curry favor by dumping big money into an inaugural fund may be disappointed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2010 | By Cathleen Decker, Los Angeles Times
Sometimes the page turns quietly, without the clang and confetti of a New Year's celebration. So it appeared last week, as the display of power visibly shifted in Sacramento a month ahead of Jerry Brown's formal assumption of the governorship from Arnold Schwarzenegger. Brown announced last week that he would hold a budget summit on Wednesday and invited the Legislature, state and local officials and other interested parties. Schwarzenegger offered a somewhat wistful soliloquy about what being governor has meant to him, in personal terms that inadvertently underscored how different his ending has been from his beginning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2010 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
In making the case why they ought to be California's next governor, Jerry Brown and Meg Whitman have slashed at the seven-year tenure of the man they hope to replace, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who in turn has slapped at each of them as he defends his priorities in office. The three-way skirmishing will come to a remarkable head Tuesday, when the three are to share a stage at the annual Women's Conference in Long Beach, hosted by Schwarzenegger's wife, Maria Shriver. "You've got the governor, who hasn't endorsed either candidate, and who both candidates are using as a whipping boy," said Raphael Sonenshein, a political science professor at Cal State Fullerton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2010 | Steve Lopez
Marcia Fritz remembers it distinctly: She had a chilled glass of Handley chardonnay in her hand and was chatting with friends on the shores of Lake Tahoe in August of 2002. She was totally relaxed until one of her pals brought up an official in her mid-size city who was retiring. His pension was to be based on a 3-50 formula. Fritz, a certified public accountant, nearly choked. The 3-50 formula meant that the official could retire at age 50 with a pension based on 3% of his final salary, multiplied by his years of public service.
OPINION
December 3, 2009
According to many pundits, the four police officers shot to death Sunday in Parkland, Wash., aren't the only victims of alleged killer Maurice Clemmons. Also wounded in the attack, perhaps fatally, was Mike Huckabee's political career. Huckabee, a presidential candidate last year who was considered a front-runner for the Republican nomination in 2012, is one of the reasons Clemmons was on the street Sunday. While governor of Arkansas in 2000, Huckabee commuted Clemmons' 108-year sentence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2009 | Evan Halper
The notion that the only safe job in a recession is a state Civil Service job was punctured this week when a Sacramento court gave the governor the authority to take an ax to the government payroll. Thursday's Superior Court ruling, which greenlighted Gov.
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