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OPINION
April 30, 2013
Re "Wolves may lose U.S. protections," April 26 I was saddened to read that the Obama administration is apparently giving up on true recovery of gray wolves in the Lower 48 states. As a wildlife biologist and an attorney, I am disappointed by the increasing role that politics have played recently in decisions related to the Endangered Species Act. Just like the delisting two years ago of wolves in the Northern Rockies, this proposed nationwide delisting is driven by politics, not science.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2014 | By Julie Cart
The California Fish and Game Commission on Wednesday postponed a controversial decision on whether to afford gray wolves protection under the state's Endangered Species Act, giving itself another 90 days to consider the matter. After listening to a spirited 2 1/2 hours of public comment in an overflowing meeting room in Ventura, the five-member commission voted unanimously to take up the issue at its next meeting in June. The decision regarding listing was prompted by the arrival in late 2011 of a young male gray wolf in Northern California.
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NATIONAL
July 26, 2009 | Julie Cart
Something has gone awry -- some would say everything has -- in the federal government's effort to reestablish the population of Mexican wolves, North America's most endangered mammal. Beginning with an initial release of 11 wolves in 1998, the Mexican wolf population in the Southwest was projected to reach at least 100 by 2006. Three years beyond, the number of wolves in the wild is half that.
SCIENCE
February 7, 2014 | By Julie Cart
The federal proposal to remove endangered species protections for all gray wolves in the lower 48 states came under fire Friday from a scientific peer review panel that unanimously found that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's decision does not reflect the best available science regarding wolves. The panel's analysis was released Friday and is the latest in a series of setbacks to the plan, announced last year. When it announced its plan last June, Fish and Wildlife Service Director Daniel Ashe called the recovery of wolves - which were hunted and poisoned to the brink extinction "one of the most successful recoveries in the history of wildlife conservation.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2009 | Jim Tankersley
Bush administration officials said Wednesday that they would remove gray wolves in the Midwest and the northern Rocky Mountains from the endangered species list -- the latest, but probably not last, chapter in the wolf's on-again, off-again federal protection. The Interior Department decision would apply to wolves in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Idaho and Montana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2013 | By Steve Marble
Times reporter Julie Cart will join L.A. Now Live at 9 a.m. Friday to discuss her exclusive story on the federal plan to remove endangered species protection for the gray wolf in the continental United States. The sweeping rule proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service would eliminate protection for wolves 18 years after the government reestablished the predators in the West, where they had been hunted to extinction. Their reintroduction was a success, with the population growing to the thousands.
OPINION
December 22, 2010
A rule for rainy days Re "Storms line up to pelt region," Dec. 20 Now that our rainy season has arrived with a vengeance, perhaps it's time to remind both motorists and, apparently, local police forces that a state law passed a few years ago requires headlights to be on if your windshield wipers are. It's common-sense traffic safety: Rain-spattered side windows make unlit cars disappear as they pull up or change lanes behind and...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2014 | By Julie Cart
The California Fish and Game Commission on Wednesday postponed a controversial decision on whether to afford gray wolves protection under the state's Endangered Species Act, giving itself another 90 days to consider the matter. After listening to a spirited 2 1/2 hours of public comment in an overflowing meeting room in Ventura, the five-member commission voted unanimously to take up the issue at its next meeting in June. The decision regarding listing was prompted by the arrival in late 2011 of a young male gray wolf in Northern California.
NATIONAL
June 7, 2013 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
Saying that gray wolves are no longer in danger of extinction, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced plans Friday to remove federal protections for the often-reviled animals nationwide and turn wolf management over to states. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Daniel Ashe called the species' comeback "one of the most successful recoveries in the history of wildlife conservation," a characterization that some conservation groups called overly optimistic given the eagerness of hunters and ranchers to kill wolves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2013 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
Federal authorities intend to remove endangered species protections for all gray wolves in the Lower 48 states, carving out an a exception for a small pocket of about 75 Mexican wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico, according to a draft document obtained by The Times. The sweeping rule by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service would eliminate protection for wolves 18 years after the government reestablished the predators in the West, where they had been hunted to extinction. Their reintroduction was a success, with the population growing to the thousands.
SCIENCE
January 17, 2014 | By Monte Morin
A new study says genomic analysis shows dogs and wolves diverged from a common wolf-like ancestor 11,000 to 16,000 years ago, although repeated interbreeding between the animals has clouded their evolutionary history. The study , published in the journal PLOS Genetics on Thursday, is the latest to argue that dogs were initially domesticated by hunter-gatherer humans, and not agriculturalists. The study authors assert that this initial domestication also occurred 11,000 to 16,000 years ago. The topic of dog domestication, and just when it occurred, is a matter of heated debate among experts.
SCIENCE
September 4, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has extended the public comment period on its proposal to remove the Canadian gray wolf from the endangered species list and its plan to maintain protections for the Mexican gray wolf.   The comment period will now end Oct. 28, and a series of public hearings have been scheduled: Sept. 20 in Washington, Oct. 2 in Sacramento and Oct. 4 in Albuquerque. The service has received much criticism for its plan to allow states to manage wolves in the Great Lakes, the upper Rockies and small populations of gray wolves in Oregon, Washington state and California.  in Albuquerque, the hearing will include an airing of the federal plan to expand the predator's current range.
SCIENCE
August 6, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The Interior Department this week opened to public comment and review its proposal to expand the range of federally protected Mexican wolves. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been attempting to reintroduce wolves into parts of Arizona and New Mexico with little success. A small population of about 75 wolves is restricted to a recovery area,  and when an animal roams beyond those borders, it must be recaptured and returned. Allowing wolves more room will increase their numbers and genetic diversity, biologists say. Livestock growers and others oppose any expansion of wolf territory.
NATIONAL
June 7, 2013 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
Saying that gray wolves are no longer in danger of extinction, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced plans Friday to remove federal protections for the often-reviled animals nationwide and turn wolf management over to states. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Daniel Ashe called the species' comeback "one of the most successful recoveries in the history of wildlife conservation," a characterization that some conservation groups called overly optimistic given the eagerness of hunters and ranchers to kill wolves.
SCIENCE
June 7, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Friday announced it intends to drop all federal protections for gray wolves in the lower 48 states, carving out an exception for a struggling population of Mexican wolves in New Mexico and Arizona. The announcement means that federal scientists believe that wolves in the lower 48 states are no longer threatened with extinction and don't require the protection afforded by the Endangered Species Act. Wolf packs are well established in the Great Lakes and Northern Rockies, as well as scattered populations in Oregon, Washington and Northern California, officials said.
SCIENCE
May 21, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The on-again, off-again protected status of wolves in the Lower 48 continues, as it appears that the expected de-listing of gray wolves in the United States has been placed on indefinite hold. The Associated Press reported that the U.S. Fish and Wildife Service indicated in filings in response to a lawsuit that the removal of gray wolves from the endangered species list was not going to happen soon, but the agency provided no further explanation. The status of the Mexican wolf, a separate species in Arizona and New Mexico, remains unclear.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal court has issued a preliminary injunction barring Wisconsin from killing gray wolves, siding with animal welfare and environmental groups that argue the killing violates the Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service had issued a permit to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources for the killing of up to 43 gray wolves. The state argued that the permit was necessary to maintain social tolerance for the wolves, which are listed as endangered. U.S.
NATIONAL
April 15, 2011 | By Julie Mianecki, Washington Bureau
The budget bill passed by Congress this week cuts $38 billion in federal spending, but there's a catch — it also includes several noteworthy policy changes, including taking gray wolves off the endangered species list in five Western states. The wolves will be removed from the list in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington and Utah, something many environmental activists oppose. "I think delisting gray wolves sets a horrible precedent," said Gary Macfarlane, ecosystem defense director for Friends of the Clearwater, an Idaho-based nonprofit group that advocates for the protection of wildlife.
OPINION
April 30, 2013
Re "Wolves may lose U.S. protections," April 26 I was saddened to read that the Obama administration is apparently giving up on true recovery of gray wolves in the Lower 48 states. As a wildlife biologist and an attorney, I am disappointed by the increasing role that politics have played recently in decisions related to the Endangered Species Act. Just like the delisting two years ago of wolves in the Northern Rockies, this proposed nationwide delisting is driven by politics, not science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2013 | By Steve Marble
Times reporter Julie Cart will join L.A. Now Live at 9 a.m. Friday to discuss her exclusive story on the federal plan to remove endangered species protection for the gray wolf in the continental United States. The sweeping rule proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service would eliminate protection for wolves 18 years after the government reestablished the predators in the West, where they had been hunted to extinction. Their reintroduction was a success, with the population growing to the thousands.
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