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NEWS
October 15, 1986 | United Press International
A family's search for a lost dog, which has included a $9,000 reward, a helicopter sweep and wanted posters, has turned this small farming town into a posse of treasure hunters. "I've heard jokes that people are going to go buy a (Great) Dane and paint it the right colors," Police Cmdr. Vern Gardner said this week. "Everyone's heard about it."
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SCIENCE
November 22, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Meet the rex wrecker, a 3-ton competitor to tyrannosaurs who stoked a family rivalry over millions of years in western North America. The fossil find in central Utah, dubbed Siats meekerorum, was from the Allosauroid family, weighed around 3 tons, was as long as a boxcar and roamed what now is the intermountain West of the United States around 98 million years ago, according to a study of the find published online Friday in the journal Nature...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2007
Hours: Noon to midnight. Location: 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa. Children age 12 and under admitted free all day. $20 unlimited ride wristband sold until 5 p.m. Ride until 8 p.m. More information: www.ocfair.com or (714) 708-3247 -- All day: Close to My Heart Scrapbooking and Orange County Night Spinners Guild All day: Ultimate sand sculpture Noon: Gummy-wormed apple contest 1 p.m.: Great Dane Baking Co. by Tina Warner (until 3:30 p.m.) 2:30 p.m.: Ceramics demonstration 3 p.m.
NEWS
October 25, 1996 | Reuters
A man and his dog dressed as reptiles with matching gecko suits won this year's Key West pet/owner look-alike contest. About 75 pets competed in the Wednesday night event, one of the zaniest and most popular of the island's nine-day Halloween Fantasy Fest. Echo Grey and her great Dane, Jagger, wearing outfits of painted zebra stripes and little else, took the prize for the most exotic costume.
NEWS
September 23, 1998 | CHRISTINE CASTRO
Dan and Michelle Black work in separate cities--Garden Grove and Long Beach--and were looking for a home that wasn't too far from either. "We were looking for just a few months," Michelle said, "but we were getting very discouraged. Prices were going up in the neighborhood that we wanted." Dan, 35, an auto technician, and Michelle, 34, an aerospace worker for Boeing, have a 6-year-old son, Nick. And they have a not-small dog named Petey--half Labrador retriever and Great Dane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1997 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
Fearing that coyotes are becoming more aggressive, the City Council has decided to go on the offensive. The council voted Tuesday to begin trapping the animals in Villa Park after hearing a resident's report of two coyote attacks on domestic dogs, including a Great Dane, in as many days. Villa Park residents took the news as evidence that coyotes had become bolder and that the city should respond in kind. Mayor Barry L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1991 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brad Anderson has a 37-year-old dog. "Dogs never live that long, but this one did. He's been feeding me all these years," allowed Anderson. His dog's name is Marmaduke. Marmaduke lives in Anderson's imagination but touches the lives of millions of people from all walks of life every day all over America and much of the world. The dog is the lovable, mischievous, unpredictable, huge great Dane in Anderson's daily cartoon panel and Sunday comic strip appearing in more than 500 newspapers.
HOME & GARDEN
July 25, 2009 | Emily Green
There was a moment late last month when I thought that what was wrong with Clunk might merely be expensive. That was when, after roughly $400 of tests, I agreed to a $600 surgery to remove a tennis ball-sized tumor from his elbow. The bill for this turned out to be $1,600. There have been many brutal moments since then, the most wretched of which was when it became clear that what was wrong with Clunk was not only expensive but also fatal.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1999 | KAREN NEWELL YOUNG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bread may be the staff of life, but it began as a baking blunder by an inept caveman. Historians say a prehistoric chef probably left grain gruel on the fire too long, producing the world's first flat bread. Since those humble beginnings, bread--from India's chapatis to Mexico's tortillas--has become as basic to meals as water or wine. Since ancient Rome, village bakers have been an integral part of most communities. But modern life has threatened the time-honored craft of baking.
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