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OPINION
April 30, 1995
What will we get when the Republicans dismantle the "Great Society"? A "Poor Society"? RONALD G. ROWE Moorpark
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SPORTS
July 9, 2011 | By Douglas Farmer and Matt Stevens
BASKETBALL GUARDS BOB COUSY (1950-63, '70) Defined the point guard position and helped shape the Boston Celtics' dynasty. His teams won six NBA titles and he was league MVP in 1957, one of only four point guards to earn that award. OSCAR ROBERTSON (1960-74) He was Magic Johnson before Magic Johnson, a tall and physical point guard who was also an exceptional scorer, defender and rebounder. JERRY WEST (1960-74) Was to Robertson what Larry Bird was to Magic Johnson.
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NEWS
March 31, 1988 | HARRY MIDDLETON, Middleton is director of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum in Austin, Tex
The President took a folded sheet of paper from his coat pocket, and to a small group of family members and house guests assembled for luncheon on the second floor of the White House, he read the stunning final paragraph of a speech he was scheduled to deliver on national television that evening. It was March 31, 1968--20 years ago today.
OPINION
October 25, 2010 | By Neal Gabler
Americans like to think of themselves as bold. It was boldness that gave birth to the country, built it, protected it from external threat and rescued it in times of domestic turbulence. Americans are proud of dreaming big and taking big chances, and as far as individual feats go, it may be true. But the larger truth is that, foreign military adventurism aside, the American government hasn't really acted boldly since the days of Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal and Lyndon Johnson's Great Society.
NEWS
April 21, 1985 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
Probably not since the siege of the Alamo has Texas seen such an assemblage of beleaguered underdogs as the liberal notables who gathered here to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the launching of Lyndon B. Johnson's Great Society. With Ronald Reagan riding high in the White House, public opinion appears to have repudiated the faith in government's problem-solving ability that generated the Great Society's effort to redress social and economic inequities.
NEWS
July 14, 1989 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
It is only 25 years since President Lyndon B. Johnson first declared his hopes and plans for a Great Society in America, but his words now sound as distant and strange as echoes from another epoch in another world. So remote do those times seem to the present era of budget restraints and hands-off government that the anniversary of Johnson's speech launching the Great Society--May 22, 1964, at the University of Michigan--passed entirely without notice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1995 | JAMES P. PINKERTON, James P. Pinkerton's book, "What Comes Next: The End of Big Government--and the New Paradigm Ahead," was published this month by Hyperion
The consensus that once supported the social welfare state is no more. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I have a dream" speech was delivered from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial; it is fitting that Louis Farrakhan's "day of atonement" oration was delivered from the Capitol, at the opposite end of the Mall. Symbolic bookends for an era: The 1963 rally anticipated the legislation that built the Great Society; Monday's assembly coincides with the dismantling of Lyndon Johnson's anti-poverty edifice.
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | Guy Molyneux, Guy Molyneux is president of the Next America Foundation, an educational organization founded by Michael Harrington.
Thirty years ago, a small book exposed widespread poverty in America--an "underdeveloped nation in our midst"--shaming a nation satisfied with its new affluence. Michael Harrington's "The Other America" inspired as well as shamed, moving two Presidents to take action. The result was the War on Poverty, part of the third great wave of 20th-Century social reform we know as the Great Society. In the wake of the Los Angeles riots, we see a different kind of national leadership.
OPINION
October 1, 1995 | Kevin Phillips, Kevin Phillips, publisher of American Political Report, is author of "The Politics of Rich and Poor" (Knopf). His most recent book is "Arrogant Capital: Washington, Wall Street and the Frustration of American Politics" (Little Brown)
Ross Perot's surprise third-party announcement didn't come in time to block the new congressional agenda moving through Washington. The trouble is, the United States can't afford another reckless economic and social experiment in which the failed liberalism of the Great Society, the expensive naivete of the 1960s, gets replaced by a new Grim Society, the rightward overreaction of the 1990s. "Conservative" isn't the right label here.
NEWS
March 25, 1995 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A partisan House approved Republican welfare legislation Friday that would fundamentally change six decades of New Deal and Great Society poverty programs by ending guarantees of federal assistance and transferring most authority over social spending to the states. On a fourth day of emotional and at times fierce debate, only nine Democrats joined with Republicans to pass the Personal Responsibility Act, a central element of the House GOP "contract with America."
OPINION
March 17, 2010 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Once upon a time, Americans did some very bad things. They enslaved Africans, displaced Indians, oppressed women and exploited laborers. Then the Great American Government came to the rescue. Spurred by protest movements for freedom and equality, the government instituted changes that brought the nation progressively closer to its founding promise. That's the theme of most American history textbooks. And it's also what offended the Texas Board of Education, which voted last week to approve a new set of social studies standards that emphasize America's timeless virtues.
OPINION
November 10, 2006
Re "Healthcare code blue," Opinion, Nov. 3 John Abramson points out an unavoidable fact -- that the United States spends more on healthcare than any other nation -- and follows it up with a whopper: "No politician wants to be tarred with the charge of promoting 'socialized medicine.' " The good doctor has somehow missed state Sen. Sheila Kuehl (D-Santa Monica), whose plan for a government-monopoly healthcare system was vetoed by Gov. Schwarzenegger. Consider also President Bush, whose Medicare drug benefit was the largest entitlement expansion since the Great Society.
NATIONAL
November 26, 2003 | Janet Hook, Times Staff Writer
It is the health-care equivalent of President Nixon's going to China: The biggest expansion of Medicare since its inception has been approved on the watch of a Republican Congress and a Republican president. This implausible product from the party of limited government is the culmination of years of snowballing pressure on Congress to provide drug coverage to senior citizens, who often face crippling pharmaceutical bills.
OPINION
September 24, 2000 | Nicolaus Mills, Nicolaus Mills is a professor of American studies at Sarah Lawrence College and the author of "The Triumph of Meanness: America's War Against Its Better Self."
With just over a week to go before the presidential debates begin, the unexpected has happened. The differences between Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush haven't narrowed, they've grown wider. At issue is the future of egalitarianism in America. Can Gore convince voters that his defense of "working families"--or, as he now prefers to call them, "hard-working, middle-class families"--constitutes a new egalitarianism?
NEWS
May 20, 1996 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baby boomers worry and wonder these days. They have a lot on their minds: the threat of downsizing, the need for retirement planning, the costs of sending kids to college and expenses of helping their own elderly parents. All this is a big load to carry, even for the self-confident generation that defined American culture and politics and business ever since they were babies in the 1950s.
NEWS
May 2, 1996 | GEORGE SKELTON
After the initial shock and fleeting stare, the world has moved on from Richmond. All we're left with is what we've been told by the police and prosecutor and learned from enterprising newspaper reporters: A 6-year old "little tiny Munchkin"--as the public defender called him--broke into a neighbor's apartment with two playmates. There, the ringleader yanked a 4-week old baby from a bassinet and punched, kicked and beat the infant with a stick before stealing a $19.99 tricycle.
NEWS
May 20, 1996 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baby boomers worry and wonder these days. They have a lot on their minds: the threat of downsizing, the need for retirement planning, the costs of sending kids to college and expenses of helping their own elderly parents. All this is a big load to carry, even for the self-confident generation that defined American culture and politics and business ever since they were babies in the 1950s.
OPINION
March 17, 2010 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Once upon a time, Americans did some very bad things. They enslaved Africans, displaced Indians, oppressed women and exploited laborers. Then the Great American Government came to the rescue. Spurred by protest movements for freedom and equality, the government instituted changes that brought the nation progressively closer to its founding promise. That's the theme of most American history textbooks. And it's also what offended the Texas Board of Education, which voted last week to approve a new set of social studies standards that emphasize America's timeless virtues.
NEWS
December 29, 1995 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
It is a legacy of the Lyndon Johnson years that lived on while other seeds of the Great Society went fallow or died on the vine--flourishing, in fact, despite periodic political firestorms and charges from the right. But after a 30-year roller-coaster ride, Congress is on the verge of drastically reducing legal aid for the nation's 39 million poor people in the most dramatic change since the program was created as part of the War on Poverty in 1965. The budget of the Legal Services Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1995
Richard N. Goodwin's "Economic Justice Dies a Slow Death" (Commentary, Oct. 18) says it all. The so-called Republican revolution beginning with Ronald Reagan's policies has had one effect: Our country resembles a Third World nation more than ever before. Look at the streets; look at the public infrastructure; look at health statistics. Do the Republicans realize they are presiding over the "Latin Americanization" of the U.S.? The widening gap between the rich and the poor, the growing disregard for working-class people, the declining educational systems, complacency about conditions in the workplace, exorbitant greed at the corporate level and government totally in bed with the high and the mighty are qualities we have come to expect in the world's undemocratic regimes.
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