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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The characters of “X Men,” “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” and “Avatar” could be singing and dancing their way across the Broadway stage.  That's because 20th Century Fox has joined forces with Tony-winning producer Kevin McCollum (“Rent”), film producer John Davis (“Predator”) and Crossroads Media's Tom McGrath to turn the studio's films into staged productions on the Great White Way. McGrath will run the daily operations of the new venture. Over the next four years, the foursome will dip into Fox's deep well of movie titles and develop at least nine musicals based upon the studio's films.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Fans can soon watch more "Les Misérables. " We already know that the century-old tale of redemption is returning to Broadway in 2014. And an update on the tale could air soon on the small screen as a primetime soap opera. Fox has purchased a script from "Veronica Mars" producer Rob Thomas and writer Graham Norris, which puts a modern spin on Victor Hugo's classic novel, Deadline.com reports . The series involves a lawyer fighting an unjust conviction from the past while exonerating innocents -- and evading a U.S. attorney -- along the way. No word on when the series might air -- or whether singing and dancing will be involved.
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BUSINESS
March 29, 1992 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everybody loves a good comeback story, and nowhere more than on Broadway. From Jordan Marsh, the down-and-out director in "42nd Street," to Cassie, the aging hoofer in "A Chorus Line," the cherished and enduring myth of drive and talent winning out against all odds is one of Broadway's longest-running themes. Now there are signs that the Great White Way--down on its luck for much of the past decade, with marquees dark and critics disdainful--may be starring in its own comeback.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
A colleague asked me the other day whether there was a character in Shakespeare to compare to disgraced former Congressman Anthony Weiner, whose New York mayoral campaign has spun out of control with salacious revelations that you'll have to read about elsewhere . Let's just say it wouldn't surprise me if the ring tone on Weiner's cellphone was a loop of Barry White moaning. Weiner is such a television phenomenon, a moth whose wings are heat-glued to the camera, that I think his story would more readily serve as fodder for one of those cable channels that loves picking the bones of celebrities who have crashed and burned.  All that's needed is a chorus of D-list talking heads to crack wise while clucking shock and disapproval.  Broadway might be a little too confining for a man with such a lusty appetite for publicity.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1993 | JEFF MacGREGOR, MacGregor is a television writer - producer who has been to the theater and finds it altogeth e r too theatrical.
TIMES SQUARE, NEW YORK CITY, 1993: Our scene opens in the walnut-paneled boardroom of the Vanna White National Repertory Theater Company. Seated at a conference table the size of a pageant runway are the board of directors. They are meeting to select the plays the company will perform in the season ahead (inspired, no doubt, by the current trend toward the boob-tubing of culture, "When Stage, Television Collide," Calendar, Nov. 30).
NATIONAL
March 9, 2003 | John J. Goldman, Times Staff Writer
The plot of the biggest production on Broadway Saturday had anger, accusations of greed, a chorus, a funeral march, pickets, disappointed theatergoers and worried business owners. At the root of it all was a bitter controversy over the use of digital music technology in theaters. The stage of virtually every Broadway musical was dark, and no negotiations between striking theater musicians and the League of American Theaters and Producers were scheduled.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Few may be popping Champagne corks for a Broadway season in which ticket prices went up, attendance went down and commercialism ran amok. But if anything could restore faith in the American theater it was Sunday's exuberant Tony Awards ceremony at Radio City Music Hall. Beginning with an opening number by the impish showman and incomparable Tony host Neil Patrick Harris (please, CBS, make him sign a lifetime contract!), the telecast found ways of selling Broadway's wares to America while honoring the Great White Way's stubbornly eccentric soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2012 | By Meredith Blake and Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - Sandy dimmed the lights on the Great White Way - but not for long. After days of shuttered performances in the wake of the storm, 27 of the 29 shows running on Broadway reopened Wednesday, despite continued power, transportation and community outages across New York City and the surrounding area. The exceptions, Disney's musicals "Mary Poppins" and "The Lion King," will return Thursday. "Evita," "Jersey Boys" and "Scandalous" canceled their Wednesday matinees but resumed with Wednesday's evening performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2006
Neither "Drowsy" nor "Purple," the color of the evening for the 2006 Tony Awards was brilliant gem-like red. Men, of course, chose de rigueur black as did more than a few women. There were the inevitable forays into pastel, along with a few dusky blues. But, primarily speaking, the Great White Way was bingeing on red.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
SAN DIEGO - Musicals are supposed to raise your spirits and warm your heart, right? Not necessarily. And certainly not in the case of "The Scottsboro Boys," the fearlessly inventive show about one of the most notorious episodes of racial injustice in America. It disturbs audiences as much as it entertains them. Who else but Kander & Ebb could pull off such a daring combination? Best known for "Cabaret" and "Chicago," John Kander and Fred Ebb were masters of "the concept musical," and "The Scottsboro Boys," created with book writer David Thompson and completed after the death of Ebb in 2004, is arguably the duo's most audacious crack at the form.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The characters of “X Men,” “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” and “Avatar” could be singing and dancing their way across the Broadway stage.  That's because 20th Century Fox has joined forces with Tony-winning producer Kevin McCollum (“Rent”), film producer John Davis (“Predator”) and Crossroads Media's Tom McGrath to turn the studio's films into staged productions on the Great White Way. McGrath will run the daily operations of the new venture. Over the next four years, the foursome will dip into Fox's deep well of movie titles and develop at least nine musicals based upon the studio's films.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
I spent the last 10 days or so on the Tonys beat, an enjoyable seasonal sojourn that offers a nice change of pace from, say, the grind of Oscar season or the hothouse of TV show sets. You can spend your whole life covering Hollywood and not come across someone who suggests Abraham Lincoln may have had a disturbing shoe fetish. Hollywood has of course been making its own forays to the Great White Way in recent years. For some this has been a fruitful pursuit. Tom Hanks was much-embraced for heading to the big stage to play a real-life journalist, even if Tonys voters didn't seem to want to reward him for the trip.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Few may be popping Champagne corks for a Broadway season in which ticket prices went up, attendance went down and commercialism ran amok. But if anything could restore faith in the American theater it was Sunday's exuberant Tony Awards ceremony at Radio City Music Hall. Beginning with an opening number by the impish showman and incomparable Tony host Neil Patrick Harris (please, CBS, make him sign a lifetime contract!), the telecast found ways of selling Broadway's wares to America while honoring the Great White Way's stubbornly eccentric soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The multifaceted James Franco will soon add another credit to his résumé: The actor-director-artist-poet is heading to the Great White Way. "We're going to do 'Of Mice and Men' on Broadway. I'm going to play George," the star of "Oz the Great and Powerful” revealed on "The Colbert Report.” This would be Franco's Broadway debut, though not for want of trying. The one-time Oscar host was slated to star opposite Nicole Kidman in a 2011 revival of “Sweet Bird of Youth,” although the production never materialized.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
If you're a community theater regular, or even attended high school or college musicals, you're likely familiar with the lively, foot-tappin' tunes of “Pippin.” It's the story of a young prince, son of the French King Charlemagne (King Charles), and his search for his place in the world.  The original Broadway version of "Pippin," directed and choreographed by Bob Fosse, debuted in 1972; it ran for five years and won five Tonys. Now "Pippin" will return to the Great White Way this March for the first time in more than 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - A few years ago, Tracy Letts was at the Broadway rehearsal of a play he'd written when he noticed some of the younger actors slacking off. Letts pulled them aside. "Don't take this for granted," the playwright and actor told them. "I mean, I've never been on a Broadway stage. " Letts recalled the story from a lounge area in the basement of the Booth Theater, where about an hour later, he had stepped onstage as George, that embodiment of human complexity and marital dysfunction in the revival of Edward Albee's classic "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2012 | By Chris Barton
It seems a career path has emerged for rockers looking to transition gracefully into musical maturity once the amplifiers have stopped buzzing in their ears. With Rod Stewart and and even Iggy Pop having lent their voice to the exploration of pop standards in recent years -- Stewart seems particularly enamored with the transition, given his seemingly endless "Great American Songbook" series -- why wouldn't a one-time shock-rocker like Dee Snider follow suit? Released Tuesday, "Dee Does Broadway" finds the one-time frontman for Twisted Sister leaping into the Great White Way's songbook with both feet, albeit with his taste for metal intact with  arrangements that recall theater-ready rock operas.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
If you're a community theater regular, or even attended high school or college musicals, you're likely familiar with the lively, foot-tappin' tunes of “Pippin.” It's the story of a young prince, son of the French King Charlemagne (King Charles), and his search for his place in the world.  The original Broadway version of "Pippin," directed and choreographed by Bob Fosse, debuted in 1972; it ran for five years and won five Tonys. Now "Pippin" will return to the Great White Way this March for the first time in more than 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2012 | By Meredith Blake and Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - Sandy dimmed the lights on the Great White Way - but not for long. After days of shuttered performances in the wake of the storm, 27 of the 29 shows running on Broadway reopened Wednesday, despite continued power, transportation and community outages across New York City and the surrounding area. The exceptions, Disney's musicals "Mary Poppins" and "The Lion King," will return Thursday. "Evita," "Jersey Boys" and "Scandalous" canceled their Wednesday matinees but resumed with Wednesday's evening performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Bradley Cooper could go against type for a Broadway revival of "The Elephant Man. " "We're going to try to do it on Broadway next fall," Cooper told E! News. "We're going to try to nail it down and do a limited run. " Cooper shaved and twisted his body this summer to play Joseph Merrick, a man who suffered from severe deformities during Victorian-era London, at the Williamstown Theater Festival in Massachusetts. The play, which ran from July 25 to Aug. 5, earned Cooper and co-star Patricia Clarkson local critical praise.
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