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NEWS
November 14, 1999
Excuse me, Sandy Banks! Your column "The Art of Letting Them Learn to Fly Free, Safely," (Oct. 31) tells of a friend's daughter going to a party where the parent leaves a group of 15-year-olds, goes out for pizza and beer and then hands out the beer to the kids. You go on and on and on about today's teens, their problems and how things have changed for teens over the years. OK, fine. Did I miss something? When, exactly, did you and your friend track down the "party mother" and have her arrested for contributing to the delinquency of minors?
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OPINION
August 28, 2012
Re "Norway's sane killer," Opinion, Aug. 26 Nathan Lean is more concerned by acts of vandalism against Muslim institutions, suggesting that these acts are inspired by various activists and writers who spread Islamophobia. His prescription is censorship. He suggests that right-wing terrorism is of greater concern. American terrorism carried out by the likes of David Koresh and Timothy McVeigh has nothing to do with Muslims. Koresh was a paranoid sexual abuser, and McVeigh was obsessed with the perceived intrusion by the federal government on our lives.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1992 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While others have been sent packing or have left in disgust, Jess Marlow re-signed a multiyear contract at KNBC-TV Channel 4 last week. In these recessionary times, he had expected the station to try to cut his salary--reported to be nearly $700,000 a year--especially after KNBC lured Paul Moyer away from rival KABC-TV Channel 7 last July with a record-breaking contract that will pay him more than $8 million over six years.
OPINION
October 23, 2011 | By Mark Bowden
Earlier this month, researchers discovered a cunning strain of malware, dubbed the Lurid Downloader, that has been systematically and silently stealing data from carefully targeted government computers in 61 countries. The discovery was made by Trend Micro, a Tokyo-based computer security company, which identified the invader as a version of a well-known strain of malware that exploits vulnerabilities in the popular programs Adobe Reader and Microsoft Office. It inserts itself into a computer's core, and then phones home to a remote operator who moves continually from domain to domain on the Internet to avoid detection.
OPINION
October 23, 2011 | By Mark Bowden
Earlier this month, researchers discovered a cunning strain of malware, dubbed the Lurid Downloader, that has been systematically and silently stealing data from carefully targeted government computers in 61 countries. The discovery was made by Trend Micro, a Tokyo-based computer security company, which identified the invader as a version of a well-known strain of malware that exploits vulnerabilities in the popular programs Adobe Reader and Microsoft Office. It inserts itself into a computer's core, and then phones home to a remote operator who moves continually from domain to domain on the Internet to avoid detection.
TRAVEL
August 11, 2002
Don't be too quick to book passage to the Villa Vannini near Pistoia, Italy ("Unearthing a Hidden Jewel in Tuscany," July 28). I spent one of the worst nights of my life there. The article mentions the hotel's lack of air-conditioning, but of far greater concern was the lack of heating when I stayed there in October about five years ago. After a night of shivering uncontrollably in my room, I could not wait to leave. Also, the chef was on vacation, and the food was inedible in his absence.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1989
"Animal Attraction," the final of four films in recent screenings at UCLA, was described as a "satire about TV, Mexico, and tourism" in which a newsman goes to Tijuana in search of "the mythological woman-and-donkey sexploitation act." Granted that the film maker tried to make light of the subject. But it was shocking to see Mexicans in stereotypical roles as poor, uneducated peasants; and the film, in its representation of bestiality, is nothing short of pornography! What is of even greater concern is that this is a student project, with a faculty adviser overseeing the production process at a state university.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1989
Thank you for your editorial. Quite naturally, I have a personal interest in the subject. But, as a taxpayer I have an even greater concern. I see our organization recruiting top people, insuring that their backgrounds are clean, training them, giving them work experience, and then having them leave for private industry or local government at a substantially greater salary. The same is true with other entities of the federal government. While many of our citizenry were happy to see the recent congressional raise fail, Congress was really only a small part of that package.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1997
I am sure that I am not the only one who calculated the average cost of school textbooks from the figures given in your article (Aug. 7). As a teacher in the San Marcos Unified School District, I must say that the $56 average is quite accurate. Of a much greater concern, however, is the lack of any control over the condition of the books once they are placed in the hands of the students. Current law requires schools to supply students with the necessary tools for learning but, in the case of returnable supplies such as textbooks, does not provide for any meaningful penalty for loss or defacement.
OPINION
August 28, 2012
Re "Norway's sane killer," Opinion, Aug. 26 Nathan Lean is more concerned by acts of vandalism against Muslim institutions, suggesting that these acts are inspired by various activists and writers who spread Islamophobia. His prescription is censorship. He suggests that right-wing terrorism is of greater concern. American terrorism carried out by the likes of David Koresh and Timothy McVeigh has nothing to do with Muslims. Koresh was a paranoid sexual abuser, and McVeigh was obsessed with the perceived intrusion by the federal government on our lives.
NEWS
October 4, 2009 | Michelle Roberts, Roberts writes for the Associated Press.
A year after Army Capt. Sam Brown was set ablaze when a bomb blew up his Humvee in Afghanistan, the 25-year-old West Point graduate endures a steady schedule of surgery and stretching to break up knotty burn scars. He also has another routine: checking a website that counts U.S. and coalition troop deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan. For Brown, it's one more reminder that the wars have not ended -- something he says many Americans seem to have forgotten. With the timetable set for withdrawal from Iraq and the fighting in Afghanistan in its eighth year, U.S. war coverage has waned, often pushed off the front page by the economy, healthcare and celebrity deaths.
WORLD
October 21, 2006 | Greg Miller, Times Staff Writer
U.S. intelligence officials and weapons proliferation experts say they are concerned that North Korea could add plutonium to the extensive inventory of arms components and technologies it already has sold to such nations as Syria, Pakistan and Libya.
WORLD
June 2, 2004 | Monte Morin and Said Rifai, Times Staff Writers
As U.S. officials hailed appointments to an interim Iraqi government as a "great list" Tuesday, a small sampling of Baghdad residents found little interest in the pedigrees and parties of the new leaders and Cabinet. What interested them most, they said, was bringing an end to the nation's violence, crime, power shortages and joblessness.
TRAVEL
August 11, 2002
Don't be too quick to book passage to the Villa Vannini near Pistoia, Italy ("Unearthing a Hidden Jewel in Tuscany," July 28). I spent one of the worst nights of my life there. The article mentions the hotel's lack of air-conditioning, but of far greater concern was the lack of heating when I stayed there in October about five years ago. After a night of shivering uncontrollably in my room, I could not wait to leave. Also, the chef was on vacation, and the food was inedible in his absence.
NEWS
November 14, 1999
Excuse me, Sandy Banks! Your column "The Art of Letting Them Learn to Fly Free, Safely," (Oct. 31) tells of a friend's daughter going to a party where the parent leaves a group of 15-year-olds, goes out for pizza and beer and then hands out the beer to the kids. You go on and on and on about today's teens, their problems and how things have changed for teens over the years. OK, fine. Did I miss something? When, exactly, did you and your friend track down the "party mother" and have her arrested for contributing to the delinquency of minors?
NEWS
September 30, 1998 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearful that global financial chaos threatens the U.S. economy, the Federal Reserve Board cut its key interest rate by a quarter of a point Tuesday in a move meant to "cushion" America from a downturn outside its shores and growing financial weakness at home. The Fed action dropped the federal funds rate, which banks charge each other for overnight loans, to 5.25%. The reduction should help the economy by keeping downward pressure on the rates consumers and businesses pay to borrow money.
WORLD
June 2, 2004 | Monte Morin and Said Rifai, Times Staff Writers
As U.S. officials hailed appointments to an interim Iraqi government as a "great list" Tuesday, a small sampling of Baghdad residents found little interest in the pedigrees and parties of the new leaders and Cabinet. What interested them most, they said, was bringing an end to the nation's violence, crime, power shortages and joblessness.
NEWS
October 4, 2009 | Michelle Roberts, Roberts writes for the Associated Press.
A year after Army Capt. Sam Brown was set ablaze when a bomb blew up his Humvee in Afghanistan, the 25-year-old West Point graduate endures a steady schedule of surgery and stretching to break up knotty burn scars. He also has another routine: checking a website that counts U.S. and coalition troop deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan. For Brown, it's one more reminder that the wars have not ended -- something he says many Americans seem to have forgotten. With the timetable set for withdrawal from Iraq and the fighting in Afghanistan in its eighth year, U.S. war coverage has waned, often pushed off the front page by the economy, healthcare and celebrity deaths.
NEWS
March 2, 1998 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
School nurse Marilyn Ashwell gulps the last of her tea, glances at her watch and springs to her feet. She has four minutes to make it from her office to La Tierra Elementary for an 11 a.m. routine with third-grader Andrea Santos. Walking briskly into the Mission Viejo school's health office, Ashwell greets the waiting 9-year-old: "Good morning, Andrea. Can we do it in eight minutes today?" Andrea smiles doubtfully, then nods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1997
I am sure that I am not the only one who calculated the average cost of school textbooks from the figures given in your article (Aug. 7). As a teacher in the San Marcos Unified School District, I must say that the $56 average is quite accurate. Of a much greater concern, however, is the lack of any control over the condition of the books once they are placed in the hands of the students. Current law requires schools to supply students with the necessary tools for learning but, in the case of returnable supplies such as textbooks, does not provide for any meaningful penalty for loss or defacement.
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