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Greater Israel

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WORLD
December 29, 2004
Times staff photographer Rick Loomis' lens is turned today to Jewish settlers, who have been supported by successive Israeli governments in laying claim to a "Greater Israel" stretching from the Jordan River to the Mediterranean Sea. The land where they have built communities, raised crops and reared children is claimed by Palestinians as part of their future state. Today, few people believe a peace agreement is possible unless settlers relinquish at least some of this territory.
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OPINION
October 29, 2013 | By Yossi Klein Halevi
Forty years ago this month, on a cold desert night, 700 Israeli paratroopers crossed the Suez Canal in rubber dinghies in a secret operation that was about to bring Israel its greatest military victory. It was the height of the Yom Kippur War, and the Jewish state had been caught in a surprise attack by Egyptian and Syrian armies. In the first chaotic days following the invasion, Israel nearly lost. Only after the paratroopers - reservists in their late 20s and early 30s - established a beachhead on the western banks of the Suez Canal did the Israeli army manage to surround Egyptian forces and win the war. The men of Paratrooper Reservist Brigade 55 had already entered Israeli history.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1991 | YEHOSHAFAT HARKABI, Yehoshafat Harkabi is professor emeritus of international relations and Middle East studies at Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
The question is frequently asked these days: Have Syria and the Arabs in general changed their position toward acceptance of Israel and living in peace with Israel? This is unanswerable, since it depends on the kind of Israel envisaged, namely, in what border configurations. The Arabs' acceptance is limited to Israel's pre-1967 boundaries and its withdrawal to them. The Arabs will not forgo such a demand; it is based on the interpretation of U.N.
OPINION
May 25, 2011 | By Dan Simon
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has rejected President Obama's recent contention that the dream of a democratic Jewish state is incompatible with permanent occupation of the West Bank. Obama suggested in two recent speeches that peace negotiations should aim for a sovereign and non-militarized Palestinian state based on pre-1967 borders, with mutually agreed swaps. But in a speech Tuesday to Congress and in other recent comments, Netanyahu has insisted that a state drawn along those lines, which would exclude some existing Jewish settlements on the West Bank, would be "indefensible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1993
In the article by Knesset member Ze'ev Benyamin Begin (Commentary, April 1), the Hebrew phrase, "Eretz Yisrael" the meaning of which is "the land of Israel," was followed by the term "Greater Israel," in parentheses. This term was undoubtedly added by the editor and not written by Begin. By identifying "Eretz Yisrael" with "Greater Israel," you distort the meaning of the article and mislead your readers. "Eretz Yisrael" is a geographic concept and not a political one. "Eretz Yisrael" is mentioned innumerable times in the Old Testament as the land of which the fathers of the nation of Israel, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, lived, and in which the people of Israel lived for approximately 1,500 years until the exile.
NEWS
July 19, 1989
President Bush, in a letter to Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, has echoed the statement of Secretary of State James A. Baker III that the idea of a "greater Israel" should be abandoned, National Public Radio said in a broadcast from Washington. Baker's exhortation, in a speech on May 22, was attacked by friends of Israel in Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1992
The Times scored a bull's-eye with its editorial about the Israeli loan-guarantee controversy. As noted, "There's plenty of humanitarian support in Washington for the housing loans, but there's little support for the Israeli government's feverish ideology." At issue is the Israeli fringe right's concept of "'Greater Israel." Depending upon which Israeli hard-liner one queries, Greater Israel can include all of Israel's current borders, plus the West Bank and Gaza, or all of Israel and the occupied territories, plus Jordan, or even all the lands from the Euphrates to Suez.
NEWS
May 23, 1989 | From Reuters
Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir today bluntly rebuffed a call by Secretary of State James A. Baker III to renounce dreams of a Greater Israel and halt Jewish settlements in occupied areas. "I think it's useless, it was useless," Shamir said in response to Baker's speech Monday. Baker, addressing the foremost pro-Israel U.S. lobby, urged Israel to give up "the unrealistic vision of a Greater Israel" and forswear annexation of the occupied territories, torn by a Palestinian uprising.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration has muted its criticism of Israel's policies in the West Bank and Gaza Strip to avoid playing into the hands of right-wing extremists in Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir's own Likud Party, well-informed sources said Saturday. Shamir faces a showdown at a party convention, scheduled July 5, over his proposal for Palestinian elections in the occupied territories. Ultranationalist critics, led by former Defense Minister Ariel Sharon, oppose the plan, which they say will ultimately lead to creation of an independent Palestinian state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1993
Suddenly, after all the posturing, threats and recriminations, a consensus has emerged among the negotiators at the Middle East peace talks in Washington that real progress toward resolving one of the world's most intractable political problems is possible. This emerging belief in the chance of eventual success represents, of course, only the first step on an arduous journey that is unlikely to conclude until this century is near its end. But at least a genuine beginning is being made.
OPINION
April 13, 2007
Re "Forget Pelosi. What about Syria?" Opinion, April 11 The true absurdity in Robert Malley's pathetic defense of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) is when he refers to the European Union, which is notoriously weak and indecisive when dealing with terrorism. Syria is a state sponsor of terrorism, which means it engages in the murder of innocent civilians, be they Westerners, Israelis or Arabs. Terrorist nations want the U.S. to be divided and indecisive so they can continue their barbarous actions, and Pelosi is only too happy to go along with this.
OPINION
September 15, 2006
FOR ISRAEL, THE OUTCOME OF the war with Hezbollah in Lebanon seems like the worst of both worlds. By responding with overwhelming force to the kidnapping of two Israeli soldiers, Prime Minister Ehud Olmert earned international opprobrium for the resulting civilian casualties. Yet the operation failed to achieve his ultimate objective: the humiliation and disarmament of Hezbollah. But the failure of the mission is exaggerated.
WORLD
May 5, 2006 | Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writer
Ehud Olmert was sworn in Thursday as Israel's prime minister, leading a coalition he hopes can carry out his main campaign pledge: to set permanent national borders by withdrawing Jewish settlers from parts of the West Bank. Olmert, a career politician named interim prime minister in January after Ariel Sharon suffered a massive stroke, has assembled a coalition representing four parties and 67 seats, a majority in the 120-member Israeli parliament, or Knesset.
OPINION
March 29, 2006 | Yossi Klein Halevi, YOSSI KLEIN HALEVI is a senior fellow at the Shalem Center and the Israel correspondent for the New Republic.
ON PREVIOUS election days, the street outside my polling station would be crowded with booths staffed by passionate activists from Israel's three-dozen-plus parties seeking one last opportunity to persuade voters. The sidewalk would be littered with leaflets from right-wing parties promising peace through strength and left-wing parties promising peace through concessions, from secular parties opposing Israeli theocracy and religious parties bemoaning godless hedonism.
WORLD
December 29, 2004
Times staff photographer Rick Loomis' lens is turned today to Jewish settlers, who have been supported by successive Israeli governments in laying claim to a "Greater Israel" stretching from the Jordan River to the Mediterranean Sea. The land where they have built communities, raised crops and reared children is claimed by Palestinians as part of their future state. Today, few people believe a peace agreement is possible unless settlers relinquish at least some of this territory.
OPINION
June 22, 2004 | Yossi Klein Halevi
With an unstable government that represents only a minority of parliament and a ruling party battling over withdrawal from Gaza, Israel appears to be hopelessly divided. In reality, however, the Israeli people have rarely been more united on a vision of national policy, even if the political system hasn't yet managed to reflect that consensus. A new centrist majority agrees on two essential insights about the Arab-Israeli conflict.
OPINION
April 13, 2007
Re "Forget Pelosi. What about Syria?" Opinion, April 11 The true absurdity in Robert Malley's pathetic defense of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) is when he refers to the European Union, which is notoriously weak and indecisive when dealing with terrorism. Syria is a state sponsor of terrorism, which means it engages in the murder of innocent civilians, be they Westerners, Israelis or Arabs. Terrorist nations want the U.S. to be divided and indecisive so they can continue their barbarous actions, and Pelosi is only too happy to go along with this.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1993
Suddenly, after all the posturing, threats and recriminations, a consensus has emerged among the negotiators at the Middle East peace talks in Washington that real progress toward resolving one of the world's most intractable political problems is possible. This emerging belief in the chance of eventual success represents, of course, only the first step on an arduous journey that is unlikely to conclude until this century is near its end. But at least a genuine beginning is being made.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1993
In the article by Knesset member Ze'ev Benyamin Begin (Commentary, April 1), the Hebrew phrase, "Eretz Yisrael" the meaning of which is "the land of Israel," was followed by the term "Greater Israel," in parentheses. This term was undoubtedly added by the editor and not written by Begin. By identifying "Eretz Yisrael" with "Greater Israel," you distort the meaning of the article and mislead your readers. "Eretz Yisrael" is a geographic concept and not a political one. "Eretz Yisrael" is mentioned innumerable times in the Old Testament as the land of which the fathers of the nation of Israel, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, lived, and in which the people of Israel lived for approximately 1,500 years until the exile.
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