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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1994
Remember the wildfires last autumn? There were several, and each blaze had a name. Collectively, however, the disaster was known as the Southern California firestorm, an important distinction that told folks throughout the nation that the damage was indiscriminate and widespread. Too bad earthquakes are named for their epicenters, or at least for where the experts initially presume the epicenter to be.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
It was a surreal scene for some, a traffic headache for others, as demonstrators set up 375 desks in neat rows Tuesday on the street in front of the headquarters of the Los Angeles Unified School District. The stunt's organizers said desks represented the roughly 375 students who dropped out of L.A. Unified schools each week during the 2011-2012 school year. According to the California Department of Education, 8,748 L.A. Unified students dropped out during that school year. It's a number organizers with the Communities for Los Angeles Student Success say they don't want district officials to gloss over.
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BUSINESS
July 22, 1990 | HERBERT NADEL, HERBERT NADEL is chief executive and president of the Nadel Partnership, an architecture, planning, and interiors firm based in Los Angeles. and
The City of Los Angeles recently approved construction of Watt City Center, a 1.6-million-square-foot office complex located downtown, west of the Harbor Freeway. As part of the deal, the developers agreed to include an on-site day-care center, implement a state-of-the-art traffic management system and pay $38 million in fees and taxes. That added about $24 a square foot to the cost of construction. Nonetheless, some citizens groups wanted the city to impose even greater taxes and fees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | By Catherine Saillant
Four of the candidates vying to replace Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky will face off this evening in the first major debate of the campaign. Scheduled to participate are former Santa Monica Mayor Bobby Shriver, former state lawmaker Sheila Kuehl, West Hollywood Councilman John Duran and former Malibu Mayor Pamela Conley Ulich. Yaroslavsky, who is leaving office after two decades, represents neighborhoods with some of the county's highest voter participation rates -- a district stretching from Santa Monica and Beverly Hills into the San Fernando Valley.  The event, starting at 7:30 at UCLA, is jointly sponsored by the Greater Los Angeles chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and radio station KCRW-FM (89.9)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
The roads in greater Los Angeles are the most deteriorated in the United States, which costs Southern California drivers more than $800 a year, according to a national transportation analysis released Thursday. Los Angeles-Santa Ana-Long Beach ranks first among cities with more than 500,000 residents for the percentage of roads in poor condition, according to TRIP, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit group that studies transportation data and issues. According to the study, about 64% of roads in greater Los Angeles are in poor condition.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Plans to find a home for Los Angeles' nascent Latino Museum of History, Art and Culture have moved forward with the formation of a site-acquisition team. "This sterling group of people will assist me in identifying permanent sites, selecting three or four possibilities, negotiating and ultimately making an acquisition," said Frank H. Cruz, president and executive director of the planned museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Doug Smith and Rosanna Xia
Santa Monica will become the first city in California to inspect concrete, steel and wood-frame buildings and require seismic retrofitting for those deemed vulnerable during a major earthquake. The city will spend more than $100,000 over the next year identifying potentially dangerous buildings, then property owners must show they are safe or fix them. City officials said they would determine over the next few months how much time the owners have to complete the retrofitting. The survey is expected to cover hundreds of buildings, including steel office towers, older concrete buildings and wood multistory apartment houses that dot the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes and Ryan Menezes
Sixteen-year-old Monica buried her face in a pillow, trying to rest for school the next day, as the clock ticked past 11 p.m. Sleep was a battle in the tiny apartment. Hunched at the other end of the family's only mattress, two of her brothers played a video game while a third lounged next to her, watching virtual soccer players skitter on screen. Her 2-year-old niece toddled barefoot near the door, toying with a pile of pennies. In all, seven people live in this wedge of space in Historic South-Central, including Monica's mother and the mother of the little girl - the longtime girlfriend of one of her brothers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1987
Adults who drank draft beer or imported beer and households using pretzels during the past year, indexed against the national average (100). Draft Beer Greater Los Angeles 88 Greater New York 89 Greater Chicago 109 Imported Beer Greater Los Angeles 139 Greater New York 136 Greater Chicago 138 Pretzels Greater Los Angeles 125 Greater New York 77 Greater Chicago 87 Source: 1986 Study of Media and Markets, Simmons Market Research Bureau, Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Rosanna Xia
A Los Angeles City Council member wants to allow owners who seismically retrofit apartment buildings to pass on the costs to tenants. Councilman Bernard C. Parks said he wants the city to explore exempting these apartment owners from the city's rent-control law as part of a larger effort by city officials to strengthen thousands of buildings vulnerable to collapse during a major earthquake. Under existing laws, only 50% of the cost of major apartment rehabilitation projects can be passed through to tenants, Parks said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Ruben Vives
A magnitude 4.4 earthquake that struck near Westwood provided an early morning jolt for Greater Los Angeles, but there were no immediate reports of damage or injuries. The quake struck at 6:25 a.m. at a depth of 5.3 miles , according to the  U.S. Geological Survey . The quake was centered near the intersection of Mulholland Drive and the 405 Freeway. A shallow magnitude 2.7 earthquake followed up at 7:23 a.m. four miles from Westwood, according to the USGS. That quake was reported at a depth of 4.3 miles.  LIVE BLOG: 4.4 earthquake strikes Los Angeles The Los Angeles Fire Department was in "earthquake emergency mode" as crews surveyed the city by air and on the ground, but public safety officials across the region said there did not appear to be any significant damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes and Ryan Menezes
Sixteen-year-old Monica buried her face in a pillow, trying to rest for school the next day, as the clock ticked past 11 p.m. Sleep was a battle in the tiny apartment. Hunched at the other end of the family's only mattress, two of her brothers played a video game while a third lounged next to her, watching virtual soccer players skitter on screen. Her 2-year-old niece toddled barefoot near the door, toying with a pile of pennies. In all, seven people live in this wedge of space in Historic South-Central, including Monica's mother and the mother of the little girl - the longtime girlfriend of one of her brothers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
A Los Angeles City Council committee took a first step Tuesday toward banning hydraulic fracturing and other disputed practices tied to oil extraction, winning cheers and applause from a packed auditorium. "Fracking and other unconventional drilling is happening here in Los Angeles, and without the oversight and review to keep our neighborhoods safe," Councilman Mike Bonin told the Planning and Land Use Management Committee. The panel decided to pass the matter along to the council after hearing from dozens of supporters.  “We can't allow the safety of our neighborhoods that we represent to be jeopardized by dangerous drilling,” Bonin said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Rosanna Xia
A Los Angeles City Council member wants to allow owners who seismically retrofit apartment buildings to pass on the costs to tenants. Councilman Bernard C. Parks said he wants the city to explore exempting these apartment owners from the city's rent-control law as part of a larger effort by city officials to strengthen thousands of buildings vulnerable to collapse during a major earthquake. Under existing laws, only 50% of the cost of major apartment rehabilitation projects can be passed through to tenants, Parks said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Doug Smith and Rosanna Xia
Santa Monica will become the first city in California to inspect concrete, steel and wood-frame buildings and require seismic retrofitting for those deemed vulnerable during a major earthquake. The city will spend more than $100,000 over the next year identifying potentially dangerous buildings, then property owners must show they are safe or fix them. City officials said they would determine over the next few months how much time the owners have to complete the retrofitting. The survey is expected to cover hundreds of buildings, including steel office towers, older concrete buildings and wood multistory apartment houses that dot the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Rosanna Xia and Doug Smith
Santa Monica will become the first city in California to inspect concrete, steel and wood-frame buildings and require seismic retrofitting for those deemed vulnerable during a major earthquake. The city will spend more than $100,000 over the next year identifying potentially dangerous buildings, then property owners must show they are safe or fix them. City officials said they will determine over the next few months how much time the owners have to complete the retrofitting. The survey is expected to cover hundreds of buildings, including steel office towers, older concrete buildings and wood multistory apartment houses that dot the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Rosanna Xia and Doug Smith
Santa Monica will become the first city in California to inspect concrete, steel and wood-frame buildings and require seismic retrofitting for those deemed vulnerable during a major earthquake. The city will spend more than $100,000 over the next year identifying potentially dangerous buildings, then property owners must show they are safe or fix them. City officials said they will determine over the next few months how much time the owners have to complete the retrofitting. The survey is expected to cover hundreds of buildings, including steel office towers, older concrete buildings and wood multistory apartment houses that dot the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2013 | Steve Lopez
In more ways than one, I'm sorry to see 2013 fade into the books. Thanks to a steady run of incompetence, corruption and bungling by various public officials, it was a banner year for local news in Greater Los Angeles. In other ways, I can't wait for 2014 to begin, because several of this year's cliffhangers are likely to play out in coming months. Can Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca get reelected, yet again, after having a far worse year than "Duck Dynasty"? Will 2014 be the year we finally find out what two mysterious nonprofits, jointly operated by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and Local 18 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, did with $40 million of ratepayer money?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2013 | By Alicia Banks
About 12,000 people gathered in downtown Los Angeles early Saturday to participate in United Way's seventh annual HomeWalk to raise money to aid the county's increasing homeless population. For the third straight year, Lakers star Kobe Bryant served as honorary chair of the annual 5K run and walk in Exposition Park that raises money for food, housing and support services for the homeless. The Kobe & Vanessa Bryant Family Foundation provides similar assistance. There is greater public awareness now that a health crisis or the loss of a job can lead to homelessness, said Christine Marge, director of Home for Good for United Way of Greater Los Angeles.
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