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Greed

ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds
It's one form of colonization: Some British authors have inherited their forebears' ability to make a reader long for simple village life. No matter how small, how petty, how isolated, they manage to whip up nostalgia for something the reader never even had. No one understood this better than the late, great E.F. Benson, author of the "Lucia" series published in the 1920s and 1930s. These delightful novels were set, like Helen Simonson's "Major Pettigrew's Last Stand," in a village in Sussex.
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SPORTS
January 30, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
The scrum of big-time sports may be adding to the pile soon. March Madness may become March Insanity. The NCAA is pondering adding to its 65-team men's basketball tournament, making it a 96-team field. It is locked into the current format only through this year's championship game. After that, it can re-negotiate its $6-billion contract with CBS. The 96-team field is a dumb idea, based on greed. So expect it to happen. If you give somebody more product, they have to pay more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2009 | Steve Lopez
Growing old, particularly in this economy, is not for sissies. Just ask Bob and Roselee Packham of Santa Monica. Bob, 63, recently lost his job with a company that does audiovisual work at conferences and meetings. That left them with the small salary Roselee, also 63, earns in a part-time position at their synagogue. Bob continues his search for work. Light a candle for them and others like them, if you're so inclined. Not that the Packhams are broke, or anywhere near the edge of the cliff.
SPORTS
November 16, 2009 | Lance Pugmire
What would appear to be a natural -- a Manny Pacquiao-Floyd Mayweather Jr. super fight -- might not be. Egos, greed and grudges could get in the way. "It's a simple negotiation," Ross Greenburg, HBO Sports president, said minutes after Pacquiao knocked down welterweight world champion Miguel Cotto twice en route to a 12th-round technical knockout Saturday. "There's so much money to be made. If it doesn't happen, there'll be a revolt. Nothing else is acceptable, and I'm speaking on behalf of the American public and the sport itself."
SPORTS
November 16, 2009 | By Lance Pugmire
What would appear to be a natural -- a Manny Pacquiao-Floyd Mayweather Jr. super fight -- might not be. Egos, greed and grudges could get in the way. "It's a simple negotiation," Ross Greenburg, HBO Sports president, said minutes after Pacquiao knocked down welterweight world champion Miguel Cotto twice en route to a 12th-round technical knockout Saturday. "There's so much money to be made. If it doesn't happen, there'll be a revolt. Nothing else is acceptable, and I'm speaking on behalf of the American public and the sport itself."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | Jon Caramanica
Every generation gets the game show it deserves. To wit, take "Pay It Off" (BET, 10 p.m. Fridays), perhaps the first television show with a cash prize to openly acknowledge the financial need that motivates its contestants. People have been coming on television to win money for more than half a century, but rarely have they had to explain why. Of course, while the contestants here relate their sob stories -- or in some cases, tales of comic relief -- there's no need. "Deal or No Deal" may have the Banker -- the omnipotent antagonist here is capitalism itself, maneuvering off screen to make the poor even poorer.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2009
Re: "Crisis has not altered Wall Street," Sept 14: I read with revulsion and despair the story of the wanton greed of the banking system giving billions in undeserved bonuses, a system that had failed and was then rescued by the federal government. These people don't care about what is good for America. They lack virtue and are proving once again that without strong federal oversight we the people are at their mercy. Paul L. Hovsepian Sierra Madre
WORLD
September 10, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
Speaking recently on Nelson Mandela Day, the chief of South Africa's Communist Party urged citizens to stick to values of equality and selflessness. He sometimes sports a Mao-style cap, and as minister of higher education, he has called for revolutionary content in university schooling. So why did he choose a $137,000 BMW for his official car, and buy it with government money? His party says he needs it for security reasons; his ministry casts it as a money-saving gesture, saying it ended the expensive car rentals of his first few months in office.
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