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Green Berets

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NATIONAL
March 18, 2005 | From Newsday
Proudly wearing their green berets and civilian garb, about 1,500 firefighters watched the St. Patrick's Day Parade from the sidelines Thursday and booed the mayor to protest an order barring them from marching in the green toppers. But the 244th annual parade, which has endured controversy before, proceeded with nary a hitch as thousands of revelers marched up Fifth Avenue amid the blare of bagpipes and the flash of green in honor of Irish heritage and culture.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
In 1969 Col. Robert Rheault landed a long-coveted assignment in Vietnam: commanding the Green Berets, the daring U.S. Special Forces group championed by President Kennedy and glorified by John Wayne . He had held the job for only three weeks, however, when a scandal broke - one that Time magazine would later call "second only to the My Lai killings. " Rheault (pronounced Roe) and five of his men were accused of murder and conspiracy in the death of a suspected South Vietnamese double agent.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2002 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
Physically, he was the smallest man in the American Legion hall, stooped under the weight of bronze medals and rows of pinned ribbons. But he was a hero to every man in the room. Retired Col. Aaron Bank, founder of the Green Berets, turned 100 on Saturday, and nearly 200 Army Special Forces soldiers and their families turned out Sunday at American Legion Post 291 in Newport Beach to celebrate. "He's the one you look up to.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2013 | Bob Pool
He had his tough side. As a kid he loved backpacking, camping, boating, flying down zip lines and a vigorous game of capture-the-flag. Sgt. 1st Class James F. Grissom was a Green Beret in the U.S. Army, after all. But the 550 people who filled San Leandro's Fairhaven Bible Chapel two weeks ago to remember Grissom were reminded that he also had his soft side. Grissom 31, of Hayward, died March 21 at Germany's Landstuhl Regional Medical Center of wounds suffered in a small-arms firefight March 18 in Paktika province, Afghanistan.
NEWS
September 23, 1988 | United Press International
Barry Sadler, who wrote and recorded the Vietnam-era song "The Ballad of the Green Berets," remains in a coma and in critical condition but appears to be improving, his agent said Thursday. "He is improving every day," literary agent Bob Robison said. "They are not saying if he will come out of the coma, the are saying when. The doctors feel he will come out of it fairly soon."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robin Moore, a nonfiction author best known for writing "The French Connection" and "The Green Berets," has died after a long illness. He was 82. Moore died Thursday at a hospital in southwestern Kentucky, Dennis Monroe of Lamb Funeral Home told the Associated Press. Born Robert L. Moore Jr., he wrote several books under the pen name Robin Moore. "The French Connection," published in 1969, was about a New York drug bust.
NEWS
October 2, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A former Green Beret captain says U.S. commandos in Somalia routinely dressed in Canadian uniforms and passed themselves off as Canadian troops. Defense Minister David M. Collenette described the claim as "very unusual" and told Parliament that military headquarters would investigate whether Canadian military procedure was breached. News agencies quoted retired Green Beret Capt. Dan Alvis as saying U.S. commandos in Somalia routinely masqueraded as Canadians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1997 | SUSAN DEEMER
A walk spanning 3,000 miles across America, starting Sunday at the base of Newport Pier, will honor a man known as the founding father of the U.S. Army 10th Special Forces unit, better known as the Green Berets. Retired Col. Aaron Bank, 94, of San Clemente founded the covert guerrilla warfare unit in 1952, following his work during World War II as a special operations officer at the Office of Strategic Services, a predecessor to the CIA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Col. Edson Raff, who bucked higher-ups in the Army to outfit Special Forces units with what would become their trademark green berets, died March 11 in Garnett, Kan. He was 95. Raff came up with the distinctive beret in 1954 as a way to boost the flagging morale of a Special Forces unit of which he had been given command. Officers of the 77th Special Forces Group at Ft. Bragg, N.C., adopted the beret and picked a green color similar to that of British Royal Marine commandos.
NEWS
January 18, 1990 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A crucial new phase of the U.S. military occupation here has left the western half of this country in the hands of about 600 Green Berets, whose specially trained units face what could be a protracted struggle as they seek to prop up fragile civilian institutions while guarding against the emergence of a guerrilla resistance.
WORLD
May 12, 2012 | By Laura King and Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - In many ways, the two young soldiers were not so different from each other. Each was tough-minded and physically powerful. Each worked hard to win a place in an elite military unit, and spoke with pride of serving his country. They were 25 years old, these two: one newly married, the other planning a wedding this year. Their upbringings were as disparate as their homelands were distant, but religious faith was entwined with the family lives of both.
NATIONAL
October 6, 2010 | By Jordan Steffen, Tribune Washington Bureau
President Obama awarded the Medal of Honor on Wednesday to Army Staff Sgt. Robert J. Miller, who died in Afghanistan after exposing himself to enemy fire and saving the lives of more than 20 U.S. and Afghan troops. Obama presented the award ? the nation's highest military recognition ? to Miller's parents during a somber ceremony in the East Room of the White House. More than 100 of Miller's friends and family attended the ceremony. "You gave your oldest son to America, and America is forever in your debt," Obama told Miller's parents, Phil and Maureen Miller.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2010 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
David E. Metzger seemed destined to be a soldier. "He always had a kind of passion for the military," said his longtime friend, Rob Casillas, who recalled mock childhood battles in the suburbs of southern San Diego County. "We'd play little war games in the fields near the Mexican border." At Mar Vista Senior High School in Imperial Beach, Metzger wore his slacks freshly pressed and his shoes scuff-free, and was careful to stay in shape, his friend recalled. "He always fit the profile of a soldier," Casillas said.
NATIONAL
January 23, 2009 | Peter Spiegel
An Army criminal investigator told the family of a Green Beret who was electrocuted while taking a shower at his base in Baghdad that the soldier's death was a case of "negligent homicide" by military contractor KBR and two of its supervisors. The report last month to the family of Staff Sgt. Ryan Maseth said Houston-based KBR failed to make certain that qualified electricians and plumbers were working on the barracks where Maseth was killed a year ago, according to a U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robin Moore, a nonfiction author best known for writing "The French Connection" and "The Green Berets," has died after a long illness. He was 82. Moore died Thursday at a hospital in southwestern Kentucky, Dennis Monroe of Lamb Funeral Home told the Associated Press. Born Robert L. Moore Jr., he wrote several books under the pen name Robin Moore. "The French Connection," published in 1969, was about a New York drug bust.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
One of the Green Berets in the National Geographic Channel special "Inside the Green Berets" is sanguine about duty in the hinterlands of Afghanistan, where U.S. forces and the Afghan army are in a daily struggle to thwart a resurging Taliban. "If we get blowed up, we get blowed up," he says. "If we don't, we don't." Afghanistan was where the Bush administration's war on terrorism began in 2001 with the quick knockdown of the Taliban and the captive government in Kabul.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Retired Army Col. Aaron Bank, who led a number of daring missions during World War II but was best known for his postwar role in organizing and serving as the first commander of the Army's elite Special Forces, has died. He was 101. Bank, who was known as "the father of the Green Berets," died Thursday of natural causes at his home in an assisted-living facility in Dana Point, said his son-in-law, Bruce Ballantine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2006 | Bob Sipchen, Times Staff Writer
SHORTLY after Jeffrey "Toz" Toczylowski's last mission in Iraq a year ago this month, friends received a message. "If you are getting this e-mail, it means that I have passed away," the missive said. "No, it's not a sick Toz joke, but a letter I wanted to write in case this happened." The Army Special Forces captain, 30, said he would like family and friends to attend his burial at Arlington National Cemetery, "but understand if you can't make it."
NATIONAL
March 18, 2005 | From Newsday
Proudly wearing their green berets and civilian garb, about 1,500 firefighters watched the St. Patrick's Day Parade from the sidelines Thursday and booed the mayor to protest an order barring them from marching in the green toppers. But the 244th annual parade, which has endured controversy before, proceeded with nary a hitch as thousands of revelers marched up Fifth Avenue amid the blare of bagpipes and the flash of green in honor of Irish heritage and culture.
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