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NEWS
October 7, 1989 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN
Robert Cornell flinches when he hears the term "water-conserving garden." "People think it means dry and dreary," or a lot of extra work for the homeowner, "but I want to dispel that," he says. "It's not so. "The entire landscape doesn't have to be (drought tolerant)," he continues, "just use water sensibly. That's why I like to call it water wise (instead of water conserving); you use it appropriately in a limited area."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2009 | David Kelly
Temecula's efforts to derail a proposed gravel mine near a pristine environmental reserve just outside of town were dealt a severe setback Thursday when officials voted against letting the city annex the land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2009 | Phil Willon and David Zahniser
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa on Tuesday laid out a second-term agenda weighted heavily toward the creation of environmentally friendly jobs to rescue Los Angeles from its economic malaise but warned of serious pain ahead as the city digs out of a half-billion-dollar budget shortfall.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2009 | Tiffany Hsu
Although the recession has emptied shopping malls and filled jobless centers, the call has only gotten louder for renewable energy, environmentally gentle products and eco-friendly practices -- and for people to make all of that happen. President Obama has said that he hopes to create 5 million green jobs within a decade. The U.S. Conference of Mayors estimates that the "green economy" could account for as much as 10% of job growth over the next 30 years. The job description casts a wide net. The green ranks can include autoworkers making hybrid cars, building consultants, home energy auditors, environmental studies professors, wind turbine engineers, lawyers for biofuel companies and many more.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | JEFF KRAMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Driving through Beverly Hills and sweeping past acre after acre of lovingly tended greenery might inspire some to ask the question: "What drought?" In the heat of midday, a groundskeeper idly bounces dead leaves off a sidewalk, using a powerful stream of water from a garden hose. At another residence, groundskeepers hose down a small patch of grass--seemingly oblivious to the sprinklers simultaneously soaking the same area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1991
Long ago, when drought loomed, California did something about it. At least it would plan to do something. A decade ago, for example, Southern California went about preparing for dramatic water shortages with a marvel of hydrologic engineering called the Peripheral Canal. It would not have made up for all the water that Arizona was preparing to siphon from the Metropolitan Water District's historic allocation, but it would have helped.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2000 | BRIAN BRENNAN, Ventura City Councilman Brian Brennan is a member of the Ventura County Regional Sanitation District
Rolling out the barrel is working for Ventura County. Most of its cities have either achieved the state's decade-old mandate to recycle more trash or they are very close. But to be truly effective, recycling programs must create reusable products--and consumers must put them to work. Assembly Bill 939 was enacted in 1990 to cut in half the amount of trash going into California landfills by this year.
REAL ESTATE
February 27, 1994 | KAREN DARDICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Dardick is a Los Angeles free-lance writer. and
Vernell Tyler proudly showed a visitor her 10-foot-by-20-foot garden plot, filled with turnips, (varieties of both roots and greens), cabbage, lettuce, mustard greens, collards and beets. "I love getting my hands into the dirt and eating good," she said with a broad smile on her face. Hers is one of 30 such raised beds in the community garden at Nickerson Gardens in South-Central Los Angeles. Enclosed by a sturdy chain-link fence, the beds are surrounded by carefully tended grass pathways.
NEWS
November 3, 1990 | VIRGINIA ELLIS and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Trying to beat back a stiff alcohol tax increase on Tuesday's state ballot, alcoholic beverage interests have poured $28 million into initiative campaigns, the largest amount by a single industry since the insurance measure wars of the last election. Business and agricultural interests have contributed a total of $57 million in the battle over a variety of propositions for increasing their taxes and regulating the environment.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At an environmental conference in Los Angeles four years ago, Marc Merson got a bright idea. During a long day of bad news about vanishing rain forests and other planetary ills, he heard a word of hope: Amory Lovins, an energy conservation expert, was explaining the virtues of compact fluorescent light bulbs, an energy-saving device that lets ordinary people help solve global problems.
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