Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGreen Industry
IN THE NEWS

Green Industry

BUSINESS
February 18, 2010 | By Tiffany Hsu
A cottage industry has sprouted in the environmental movement, but it has nothing to do with wind turbines or carbon offsets. The green scene has been flooded with conferences, conventions, trade shows and other events trying to capitalize on the popularity of sustainability and concerns about climate change. Most of the meetings deal directly with environmental issues such as carbon emissions, conservation or alternative energy. Even some industry trade shows, such as electronics and textiles, have green elements, including special pavilions and panel discussions.
Advertisement
HOME & GARDEN
November 1, 2007 | Debra Prinzing, Special to The Times
Plant a rooftop; change your life. That's Pamela Berstler's mission. By converting traditional heat-generating roofs into energy-saving ecosystems where succulents and wildflowers flourish, the West Los Angeles landscape designer hopes to transform the local landscape, one green roof at a time. "It's easy to treat this as a fad, or a trend, but this is what our future looks like," Berstler says.
NATIONAL
February 1, 2010 | By Richard Fausset
Here in this Mississippi Delta county, they are waiting for the return of the slender man in the elegant suit -- the one who spoke, in a heavy Chinese accent, of a promise that couldn't have been more welcome or fashionable. It was the promise of a new green industry, with hundreds of green jobs. "I heard about it," said Claude Boyd, a 41-year-old farmhand out of work after the winter harvest. "I need it bad. I've got good references." Joey Lowery, 42 and also unemployed, sounded a skeptical note.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2009 | By Tiffany Hsu
During his more than three decades in real estate David Pogue played many roles, but environmental expert was never one of them. That didn't stop his company, Los Angeles real estate brokerage CB Richard Ellis, from naming him the company guru of all things eco-friendly nearly two years ago. Pogue suddenly found himself in charge of making the firm and its projects more energy efficient and environmentally conscious, an abrupt switch from his previous...
NATIONAL
February 15, 2008 | Stephen Braun and Tom Hamburger, Times Staff Writers
The nation's economic anxieties took center stage in the increasingly rancorous Democratic presidential race Thursday as Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama tilted their campaigns toward blue-collar voters in the upcoming Wisconsin and Ohio primaries. Both candidates tweaked their advertising and campaign messages to deliver stinging television ads and stress populist economic themes.
NEWS
October 7, 1989 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN
Robert Cornell flinches when he hears the term "water-conserving garden." "People think it means dry and dreary," or a lot of extra work for the homeowner, "but I want to dispel that," he says. "It's not so. "The entire landscape doesn't have to be (drought tolerant)," he continues, "just use water sensibly. That's why I like to call it water wise (instead of water conserving); you use it appropriately in a limited area."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2009 | David Kelly
Temecula's efforts to derail a proposed gravel mine near a pristine environmental reserve just outside of town were dealt a severe setback Thursday when officials voted against letting the city annex the land.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2009 | Phil Willon and David Zahniser
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa on Tuesday laid out a second-term agenda weighted heavily toward the creation of environmentally friendly jobs to rescue Los Angeles from its economic malaise but warned of serious pain ahead as the city digs out of a half-billion-dollar budget shortfall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1991
Long ago, when drought loomed, California did something about it. At least it would plan to do something. A decade ago, for example, Southern California went about preparing for dramatic water shortages with a marvel of hydrologic engineering called the Peripheral Canal. It would not have made up for all the water that Arizona was preparing to siphon from the Metropolitan Water District's historic allocation, but it would have helped.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|