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October 27, 1990 | AL MEYERHOFF, Al Meyerhoff is a senior attorney with the San Francisco office of the Natural Resources Defense Council and a co-author of Proposition 128. and
As ballot initiatives play an increasingly important role in the governance of California, a concomitant but dangerous trend is also developing: use of the Big Scare. In recent years, for example, we've been told that certain ballot initiatives would cause a mass exodus of the insurance industry from the state (Proposition 103) and that "the death knell" would sound for California agriculture (Proposition 65). The November ballot is no exception.
Doni Green is making quite a debut as Moorpark College's head men's and women's cross-country and track and field coach. Green, a longtime Moorpark assistant before last fall, guided the men to their second consecutive state junior college cross-country title in November and both Raider teams finished fifth in the Southern California track championships at Cerritos College on Saturday.
May 19, 2010 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
A state law that requires power plants, factories and other businesses to cut greenhouse gas emissions could cause energy prices to rise and prompt businesses to delay expansion or flee California, according to a study by the state Legislative Analyst's Office. The landmark global warming law, which is being enforced in phases, could put the state's businesses at a competitive disadvantage unless other states and the federal government come up with similar plans, the study by the nonpartisan agency said.
March 1, 2009 | Marla Dickerson
One man in the classroom earned more than $100,000 framing tract homes during the building heyday. Another installed pools and piloted a backhoe. Behind him sat a young father who made a good living swinging a hammer in southern Utah. But that was before construction jobs vanished like a fast-moving dust storm in this blustery high desert. Hard times have brought them to a classroom in rural Kern County to learn a different trade. Tonight's lesson: how to avoid death and dismemberment.
November 5, 2009 | Maeve Reston
Cecilia V. Estolano, head of the Community Redevelopment Agency, said Wednesday that she would step down at the end of the month to join an Oakland-based group focused on generating green jobs in underserved neighborhoods. News of Estolano's departure disappointed some advocates for the poor, who praised her for focusing heavily on affordable housing and requiring real estate developers to provide "community benefits," such as higher-wage jobs. CRA board Chairman Bruce D. Ackerman said Wednesday that Estolano had done a "fabulous job" and that he had received no warning of her departure.
January 21, 2010
The Go Green Expo is a behemoth of environmentally conscious events and presentations, the kind that would bring a smile to Al Gore's face. The highlights include the Blue Planet Film Fest, presentations on sustainable investing, "eco-logical" homes, green jobs and free yoga classes. The Los Angeles Convention Center, 1201 S. Figueroa St., South Hall J, Los Angeles. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sat., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sun. Weekend pass, $10. www.gogreenexpo .com.
August 13, 2011 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
Empty soda bottle? Blue bin. Small wood box? Black bin. Magazine? Blue again. It's become part of life for millions of L.A. residents to sort their trash based on what can be recycled and what can't. How much gets diverted from the landfill gives L.A. some bragging rights: It's at the top of the charts among major cities. More than 450 natural gas-powered trucks make a coordinated effort to divert about 65% of the city's trash from landfills. But that's just for single-family homes.
November 9, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Cities in Los Angeles County face spending billions of dollars to clean up the dirty urban runoff that washes pollution into drains and coastal waters under storm water regulations approved Thursday night by the regional water board. Despite more than two decades of regulation, runoff remains the leading cause of water pollution in Southern California, prompting beach closures and bans on eating fish caught in Santa Monica Bay. The runoff - whether from heavy winter rains or sprinkler water spilling down the gutter - is tainted by a host of contaminants from thousands of different places: bacteria from pet waste, copper from auto brake pads, toxics from industrial areas, pesticides and fertilizer from lawns.
October 21, 2011 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
The California Air Resources Board on Thursday unanimously adopted the nation's first state-administered cap-and-trade regulations, a landmark set of air pollution controls to address climate change and help the state achieve its ambitious goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The complex market system for the first time puts a price on heat-trapping pollution by allowing California's dirtiest industries to trade carbon credits. The rules have been years in the making, overcoming legal challenges and an aggressive oil industry-sponsored ballot initiative.
March 5, 2009 | Richard Simon
A massive spending bill expected to be approved by Congress this week is filled with more than 8,500 earmarks -- those pet projects that lawmakers love -- costing $7.7 billion. Despite the tough economy, mounting federal budget deficit and pledges by President Obama and members of both parties to crack down on the practice, a number of lawmakers have defended their earmarks as important to the nation's economic recovery.
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