Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGreen Lights Program
IN THE NEWS

Green Lights Program

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 31, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the state of California Thursday entered a five-year energy conservation and pollution prevention pact expected to save more than $250 million through the use of high-technology, high-efficiency lights in state offices and facilities. Signing a memorandum of understanding during a television hookup between Washington and Sacramento, EPA Administrator William K. Reilly and Gov.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2007 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
It was Earth Day on Sunday, the 38th since its inception and the first since "An Inconvenient Truth" -- last summer's "Jaws" -- woke the country up to a new fear. Suddenly everything is "green," if only green for a day.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gary Porter is the man in Ventura County who is in charge of the Green Lights program for our local utility, Southern California Edison. No, he's not a traffic engineer. He's responsible for installing in Edison's several offices and facilities in Oxnard and elsewhere a type of fluorescent lamp and reflector that merely sips at the electric power flow, consuming only a fraction of what it used to take to light the workplace. "Green lighting" is the moniker the U.S.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gary Porter is the man in Ventura County who is in charge of the Green Lights program for our local utility, Southern California Edison. No, he's not a traffic engineer. He's responsible for installing in Edison's several offices and facilities in Oxnard and elsewhere a type of fluorescent lamp and reflector that merely sips at the electric power flow, consuming only a fraction of what it used to take to light the workplace. "Green lighting" is the moniker the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2007 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
It was Earth Day on Sunday, the 38th since its inception and the first since "An Inconvenient Truth" -- last summer's "Jaws" -- woke the country up to a new fear. Suddenly everything is "green," if only green for a day.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1993 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FHP International Inc., the nation's largest provider of managed care services to Medicare recipients, said Tuesday that it has signed a consulting contract to help a Missouri competitor start its own elderly care program. The Fountain Valley health maintenance organization would not disclose the value of its contract with GenCare Health Systems Inc. in St. Louis. FHP soon will be sending a team of employees to GenCare headquarters, said FHP spokeswoman Ria Carlson.
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, Richard Kahlenberg is a writer who has been involved with environmental issues for 20 years.
When Richard Mangiarelli first went into the energy saving business 10 years ago, one of his selling points was a state and federal tax break for installing solar-powered heating equipment. But in 1985, the subsidies were eliminated, depressing a market that from an environmental standpoint was needed more than ever. Producing electrical power not only consumes energy, it creates pollution.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Claiming a significant step in efforts to conserve energy, the nation's largest producer of computer chips announced Wednesday that all of its future microprocessors will put personal computers into a "sleep" mode when they are idle. Santa Clara-based Intel Corp. said the new chips will bring about a 70% reduction in electrical consumption by a typical home computer and could amount to consumer savings of $1 billion a year by the end of the decade.
NEWS
October 20, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In moving ahead Tuesday with a largely voluntary plan to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases, President Clinton may not have been spared the criticism of environmentalists, who called his plan a weak first step. But he could at least bypass the delay and partisanship of the congressional approval process. "This plan isn't designed for an archive," Clinton said. "It's designed for action, for rapid implementation, constant monitoring and for adjustments as necessary to meet our goals."
NEWS
May 31, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the state of California Thursday entered a five-year energy conservation and pollution prevention pact expected to save more than $250 million through the use of high-technology, high-efficiency lights in state offices and facilities. Signing a memorandum of understanding during a television hookup between Washington and Sacramento, EPA Administrator William K. Reilly and Gov.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|