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Green Onions

FOOD
January 16, 1986
Quick and easy entrees--that's what everyone is looking for these days. These two recipes use trout to fill the bill and won't destroy the budget either. Canned cream-style corn is combined with bread crumbs, onion and seasonings, then tucked inside the fish and baked. In just 15 minutes Corn-Stuffed Trout will be piping hot and flaky. Garnish with lemon and serve with buttered broccoli. In Fried Trout, the fish is floured and quickly browned.
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FOOD
February 18, 1993 | CHARLES PERRY
Beer was the national beverage of the ancient Babylonians. To judge from three 3,500-year-old cuneiform tablets belonging to Yale University, they often cooked with beer too. Here we try to recreate a beer and lamb recipe from the tablet known as Yale Babylonian 4644 . . . with a certain amount of guesswork, since the ancient recipes don't give many measurements and every one of them calls for one or more totally mysterious ingredients.
FOOD
April 27, 1989 | DIANA SHAW, Shaw is a free-lance writer in Los Angeles.
It seems quite likely we're going to be subject to hot spells this spring. That means a long salad season ahead and the potential for months of monotonous meals of greens with dressing. Here are two offbeat, nourishing, cooling combinations that require little cooking and contain no added fat. The Borscht Salad served with whole-grain bread makes a good lunch, and the satay can stand alone for supper. BORSCHT SALAD 1 bunch beets, stems removed 1 1/2 cups plain yogurt 1 small clove garlic 1/4 cup minced green onions, white part only Juice of 1/2 lemon 1/4 cup orange juice Cook beets in boiling water 40 minutes.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Green onions are believed to be the source of hepatitis A outbreaks that sickened more than 280 people in Georgia and Tennessee last month, health officials said. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration still trying to determine where the onions originated, said Richard Quartarone, a spokesman for the Georgia Division of Public Health. Georgia typically sees about 50 cases of the infection each month, but 210 people who ate at restaurants in the Atlanta area were sickened in September.
FOOD
November 14, 2001 | MARY ELLEN RAE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most people love the day after Thanksgiving for shopping or football games, but I love it for turkey sandwiches. This version of turkey salad is easy enough; just toast some nuts, chop some celery and green onions, mix it with leftover turkey and mayonnaise, and you've got a spread for rolls or sliced bread. If you'd like, use any leftover cranberry sauce on the sandwiches as well. To limit your time in the kitchen the day after, use nuts you've toasted ahead of time.
FOOD
November 12, 2003 | Cindy Dorn, Times Staff Writer
Dear SOS: Many years ago, a Japanese restaurant in Gardena (which has since closed) made a very tasty flank-steak dish called negimaki (beef with onions). It was thin slices of flank steak rolled around green onions with a tempura-style sauce. I have not been able to find it anywhere else, and my Japanese friends can't find it in their cookbooks. Sally Friedfeld Rancho Palos Verdes Dear Sally: Timing is everything.
FOOD
June 16, 1999 | ROSE DOSTI
DEAR SOS: My husband and I had lunch at the Princeville Resort Hotel in Hawaii and loved the "poke appetizer." Could you obtain the recipe? We'd love to try it at home. SUSAN PHILLIPS Valley Village DEAR SUSAN: So easy to make, and the Princeville people were happy you asked. Poke (poh-kay) is the traditional Hawaiian ceviche, using ahi tuna and rock salt to "cure" the raw fish. Fish prepared in this manner should be fresh and free of any odor.
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