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Greeting Cards

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NEWS
November 16, 2000 | BETTY BABOUJON, betty.baboujon@latimes.com
Sending e-cards for the holidays? How convenient--and how in the spirit of . . . Scrooge. Free virtual cards might beat signing 109 paper cards, but you know it's just not right. Besides, some sites will do the writing and mailing for you. Greeting cards in paper form are tougher to find online than the free virtual kind. Still, they're out there. You can go two ways: Have the cards sent to you or have the site fill in your message and send the card to the recipient.
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BUSINESS
December 23, 2013 | David Lazarus
Spoiler alert: There's a really good chance you'll get a gift card for Christmas. That's not a news flash from the North Pole. It comes instead from the National Retail Federation, which estimated in a recent report that more than 80% of shoppers will be including the plastic gift cards inside greeting cards this holiday season. The average person will spend about $163 on gift cards, the group's survey found. That's up 4% from last year and represents the highest average amount since the retail association began tracking such things 11 years ago. Total spending on gift cards this season will reach about $30 billion, the group said.
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BUSINESS
November 24, 2011 | By Rosanna Xia, Los Angeles Times
The greeting card business may be in need of a get-better-soon card. In the Internet age, with electronic greetings of all kinds now available, sales of traditional greeting cards have been on a long, gradual decline. In 1995, the national Greeting Card Assn. boasted that 2.7 billion Christmas holiday cards would be sold that year. This year, that number has dropped to 1.5 billion cards. Even so, greeting card makers say don't count them out. The industry estimates overall sales of 7 billion greeting cards this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
Comedian Kurt Braunohler has promised, within a matter of minutes, to rearrange the downtown Los Angeles sky. It's 2:23 p.m. and half a dozen people on a recent Saturday crane their necks and squint into the sun as they wait outside a Hill Street high-rise to be let up to the roof. "Don't bother, man, it's at capacity in there," says a petite woman, her face obscured by enormous Jackie O sunglasses and a painter's cap. herapist, has a weekly average of about 1.2 million viewers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
Holiday greeting cards are being sold to help raise money for 25 charitable organizations that include the Leukemia Research Foundation, Children's Hospital of Orange County and the American Heart Assn. Known as "Cards That Care," the program helps service organizations raise money through the sale of greeting cards, many of them created by the very patients who will benefit from the fund-raising, including pediatric cancer patients, victims of child abuse and the developmentally disabled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1997 | JOHN CANALIS
No place to stash all those holiday cards? Don't toss them. Recycle. The Costa Mesa Sanitary District is promoting a holiday card recycling program that benefits homeless and neglected children at a care home in Nevada. Residents are asked to mail their unwanted cards to the nonprofit home year-round or take them to City Hall by Jan. 9. "They accept get-well cards, birthday cards, everything," said Lois Thompson, assistant manager of the district. Mail cards to St. Jude's Ranch for Children, P.
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Northern California church group is trying to ban from stores a line of greeting cards that contain condoms. The greeting cards are being test marketed in Redding, Chico, Sacramento, Reno and elsewhere. The distributor, "Condom-Wise" of Redding, says they are designed to promote AIDS awareness. But Pastor Burt Smith of the Little Country Church in Palo Cedro says the cards violate Christian beliefs. Smith says he has collected more than 300 signatures on a petition seeking the ban.
NEWS
August 14, 1987 | DAVID STREITFELD, The Washington Post
The weather was bad in Kansas City, Mo., earlier this month: Humidity lay like a tarp over the heartland. People wandered about in a sweaty haze, dreaming of thunderstorms, vacations at Lake of the Ozarks, and cold beer at Royals' games. All except for one woman, who sat in a building on the edge of downtown and considered a different season as she wrote: "It is a time of beauty, as the earth lies sleeping beneath a snowy blanket. . .
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2009
I think you should put "greeting cards with sound" in your "Overrated" column. What ever happened to pithy sayings and heartfelt notes? Eric Christianson Fullerton
BUSINESS
December 19, 1995 | PAUL H. JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Americans open their holiday cards this year, many are likely to be covered in simple scenes reminiscent of 19th century life--clapboard houses covered in snow with jolly St. Nick, chubby and cherub-faced, ready to climb down the chimney. Greeting card companies say that there continues to be a return to more traditional and religious themes this season, as Americans look to buy cards that will rekindle family traditions and spiritual ties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein
Prosecutors charged an attorney with half a dozen felony counts for allegedly trying to smuggle heroin into an L.A. County jail inside a greeting card. Stephen Beecher, 61, who was arrested April 9, faces counts including conspiracy, bringing drugs into jail, transportation of a controlled substance and bringing a firearm into a jail, said Jane Robison, a spokeswoman for the Los Angeles County district attorney's office. The Sherman Oaks resident was released on bail Thursday and scheduled to be arraigned May 1 in a downtown courtroom.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
We've all received them - cheesy holiday greeting cards and party invites with messages like, "Ho ho hope you have a very merry Christmas. " Pre-written mass-produced cards are getting passed over in favor of a slew of new options, both digital and paper, created online via websites or apps. The expanded offerings come as card companies gear up for the busiest time of the year. Planning on throwing a holiday party? Evite last month launched Postmark, the West Hollywood company's first new offering since its 1998 launch.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
We've all stood in front of the rows of too-generic, over-syrupy, more-a-cough-than-a-chuckle or ethnically tone-deaf selection of greeting cards available at stores. In an effort to get personal, Hallmark and Shutterfly are teaming up to offer more than 1,000 exclusive Hallmark-designed customizable cards. They will be available on Shutterfly's new personalized greeting card site, Treat , which features integrated scheduling and reminders directly connected with Facebook. "The millions of consumers who already store photos on Shutterfly will now have easy access to Hallmark's creative and editorial expertise as they create their own individualized cards through a quality experience on Shutterfly," Rob Bensman, Hallmark vice president of strategic alliances, said in a news release . This fall, Shutterfly.com and tinyprints.com will offer a collection of Hallmark holiday designs, according to the release.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Most people approach the annual rite of sending holiday cards with all the enthusiasm of filing income tax returns. It's just one more chore on a long to-do list this time of year. But this holiday season Silicon Valley is taking the wraps off an early Christmas gift that could make sending cards cool again: new smartphone apps that make it faster and easier to create and mail cards to far-flung family and friends. The card-sending apps from Apple Inc. and other companies work on iPhones, iPads and Android devices in a few minutes for a few bucks: Just download the app, choose a design and a photo, add a sentiment and click "send" to someone in your address book.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2011 | By Rosanna Xia, Los Angeles Times
The greeting card business may be in need of a get-better-soon card. In the Internet age, with electronic greetings of all kinds now available, sales of traditional greeting cards have been on a long, gradual decline. In 1995, the national Greeting Card Assn. boasted that 2.7 billion Christmas holiday cards would be sold that year. This year, that number has dropped to 1.5 billion cards. Even so, greeting card makers say don't count them out. The industry estimates overall sales of 7 billion greeting cards this year.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2011 | By Christina Rosales
Greeting card companies have taken a cue from the nation's 9% unemployment rate. In a 6-by-4-inch envelope, someone can send a friend who lost a job a pre-printed message of encouragement and sympathy. Although not available at every corner store, layoff greeting cards are being produced by Hallmark and sold at its stores and online — and selling well, said Frank Fernandez, owner of two Hallmark stores in North Texas. "We're in the emotional business," Fernandez said.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1997 | JENNIFER OLDHAM
Mark Wong wanted to send a note and a few pictures of his dog to an ailing friend, so he jumped on his computer and designed a jazzy get-well package, envelope and all. The letter was such a hit with his friend that he decided to start his own company.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1988 | Associated Press
With something as simple as a greeting card, Truesillia Ruth Shank hopes to help bridge the gap between the separate worlds of the sighted and the blind. "It seems so unfair that a blind person should miss out on the simple, little pleasures of life," said Shank, sitting in the living room of her modest home that doubles as the office for her 7-month-old card company, Sucurre Greetings. Sucurre is an Old French word meaning "to assist."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2009 | Associated Press
Fresh off her triumph at the Country Music Assn. Awards, Taylor Swift has netted a deal to create a line of greeting cards. American Greetings Corp. Chief Executive Zev Weiss says Swift's abilities as a storyteller and songwriter make her a natural for writing cards that will appeal to all ages. The company said Tuesday that cards, gift wrap, stationery, online greetings and other related products overseen by Swift would begin appearing in the spring. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2009
I think you should put "greeting cards with sound" in your "Overrated" column. What ever happened to pithy sayings and heartfelt notes? Eric Christianson Fullerton
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