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Gregory Boyle

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1999
Corporate sponsors and local residents have raised nearly $300,000 to reopen a gutted Boyle Heights bakery that provided work and job training for former gang members, officials said Thursday. Homeboy Bakery, which employed 11 ex-gang members, closed last month after an electrical fire caused more than $40,000 in damage to the bakery's front office and packaging area.
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NEWS
May 15, 1994
A daylong workshop will seek to help staff members and volunteers address the issue of ethics in the nonprofit sector. "Are We Still the Good Guys? Ethics and the Nonprofit Sector" will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 24 at the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center, 244 S. San Pedro St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2009 | Rich Connell
Los Angeles City Atty.-elect Carmen Trutanich announced Monday he had recruited teams of volunteer lawyers, homeowners, educators and others to conduct a top-to-bottom review of the sprawling government law office he takes over July 1. The working groups will develop "an action plan to restructure and reform the office of the city attorney to better serve the people," Trutanich said in a statement. Among other topics, the examination will cover anti-gang programs, public integrity enforcement, how the office is administered and a new unit of professional investigators that Trutanich wants to create.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
From the gold crucifixes worn with cool zoot suits in the 1940s to the intricate tattoos of the Virgin of Guadalupe on some gang members today, religious icons have long formed an integral part of Latino youth culture. Holy images can be found throughout Southern California, especially where the Latino population is concentrated. Rosaries dangle around a teenage girl's neck. The face of Christ ringed with a crown of thorns is etched on a young man's arm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2009 | Elaine Woo
To those who didn't know her, Los Angeles County probation officer Mary Ridgway might have seemed miscast for her job. She was a woman in a field long dominated by men, who was fond of pink and purple outfits, jade jewelry, flower pins and floppy hats. And she was assigned to gang-ridden neighborhoods in East Los Angeles, even though, as one of her former probationers noted, "she didn't speak a lick of Spanish."
NEWS
March 19, 1992 | MEMO MUNOZ, SPECIAL TO NUESTRO TIEMPO
Some of the wards at Juvenile Hall in Lincoln Heights cried openly after a recent screening of the Universal Studios movie "American Me," recalled actor Edward James Olmos. Olmos said a few of the young prisoners confessed to being scared over the uncertain future they face if they continue breaking the law. The fear might have come from the way Olmos, who stars in the film and also makes his directorial debut, portrays the stark realities of prison life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1996 | ERIC WAHLGREN
Father Gregory J. Boyle, the Catholic priest famous for his efforts to help Los Angeles youth stay out of gangs, will speak in Oxnard on Wednesday about his experiences. Boyle heads Jobs for a Future, an employment referral center for youth in East Los Angeles. Peter Martinez, a senior deputy probation officer with Ventura County's Correction Services Agency, said he hopes the talk will help Oxnard residents learn more about who is at risk.
OPINION
June 30, 2002
Orange County in recent years has made significant progress in developing programs in the law enforcement and educational communities to help troubled youth and reduce gang activity and violence. The Orange County Human Relations Commission deserves credit for encouraging this work through its long-standing practice of honoring schools and police departments that make solid contributions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1999
The Comedy Club in Hollywood is donating the proceeds from every Sunday night show in December to help reopen a Boyle Heights bakery that has provided training and paychecks to ex-gang members. The Homeboy Bakery, which employed 11 former gang members, closed in October after an electrical fire caused an estimated $40,000 in damage.
OPINION
August 11, 2004
Re "The Scars of Graffiti," editorial, Aug. 9: Father Gregory Boyle's decision to close down Homeboy Industries' graffiti-removal program is sadly understandable. Who can put young men in front of drive-by firing squads and not pull back? Young men killing young men in a nightmare game of tag is not acceptable and yet has continued for generations. This is terrorism, not some villain hiding in a cave, but a toxic stew of poverty and ignorance and fear. We have not even come close to ending the unholy war of youth against youth in our city.
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