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Gregory Crewdson

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It is a rare thing to witness the creative process. But in the excellent new documentary "Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters," filmmaker Ben Shapiro gives us fly-on-the-wall access over a 10-year period to an acclaimed artist as he envisions, designs and executes his surreal commentary on small-town American life in the form of an epic photo installation, "Beneath the Roses. " Bit by bit Shapiro uses Crewdson's musings to piece together the way he moves from a jumble of thoughts to the moment he shoots.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It is a rare thing to witness the creative process. But in the excellent new documentary "Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters," filmmaker Ben Shapiro gives us fly-on-the-wall access over a 10-year period to an acclaimed artist as he envisions, designs and executes his surreal commentary on small-town American life in the form of an epic photo installation, "Beneath the Roses. " Bit by bit Shapiro uses Crewdson's musings to piece together the way he moves from a jumble of thoughts to the moment he shoots.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2002 | SUZANNE MANTELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If ever a gallery artist were ripe for defection to Hollywood, New York photographer Gregory Crewdson is the one. Crewdson, 39, creates large-scale color tableaux of ordinary people in not-quite-right domestic settings. To realize his vision, he brings an entire film crew to his suburban "sets" and spends months in the throes of "post production."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2009 | Hunter rohojowska-Philp
Living artists are hardly a priority at the J. Paul Getty Museum, so photographer Jo Ann Callis is still a little stunned to be having a show there. And grateful. "I feel so lucky," she says. "I was prepared to be anonymous. I was enjoying life. I was thinking, 'It's OK. I had some moments in the past, and that is enough.' " "Jo Ann Callis: Woman Twirling," as the show is titled, refers to her warm-hued photograph of a woman in a circle skirt spinning around in a blur. Her furious yet solitary movement contrasts with the stillness of a carved wood sculpture of an entwined couple that doubles as the base of a lamp.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2005 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
An attractive, middle-aged woman stands naked in a motel bathroom. A small amount of blood drips from between her legs to the tile floor, and it seems to have caught her by surprise. She stands frozen in place, as if internally weighing the ramifications. The scene is staged in one of Gregory Crewdson's densely narrative, large color photographs at Gagosian Gallery.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2002 | ARIELLA BUDICK, NEWSDAY
Suburbia, in its ideal form, is a place free from ambiguity. Neat, evenly spaced houses surrounded by kempt green lawns and tidy gardens have stood, in movies, on television and in the popular American consciousness, as symbols of normality and as concrete manifestations of the American Dream. Recently, though, the suburbs have come in for a drubbing. Films such as "American Beauty" and the HBO series "The Sopranos" wallow in the undercurrents of dysfunction beneath the placid reverie.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2009 | Hunter rohojowska-Philp
Living artists are hardly a priority at the J. Paul Getty Museum, so photographer Jo Ann Callis is still a little stunned to be having a show there. And grateful. "I feel so lucky," she says. "I was prepared to be anonymous. I was enjoying life. I was thinking, 'It's OK. I had some moments in the past, and that is enough.' " "Jo Ann Callis: Woman Twirling," as the show is titled, refers to her warm-hued photograph of a woman in a circle skirt spinning around in a blur. Her furious yet solitary movement contrasts with the stillness of a carved wood sculpture of an entwined couple that doubles as the base of a lamp.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2008 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
All the world may be a stage, but Gregory Crewdson's big color photographs manage to flatten it into a backdrop for an overproduced photo shoot. Like ads for luxury cars, pricey perfumes and exotic getaways, Crewdson's 19 nearly 5-by-8-foot inkjet prints at the Gagosian Gallery are less concerned with exploring the world they depict than with selling a fantasy about it. Nothing wrong with that. A compelling illusion can be eye-opening. Unfortunately, Crewdson's meticulously manicured images (in editions of six)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2003 | Scott Timberg
Last year, his surreal, elaborately produced photographs hung on the walls in Beverly Hills' Gagosian Gallery. Now -- uncredited -- he's on the sides of buses, in glossy magazines and on the cover of industry invites. New York artist Gregory Crewdson has provided HBO with a tense tableau of the "Six Feet Under" cast for the program's latest ad campaign. In the lush color photo, the show's stars sit around a table after a meal that seems to have been interrupted by ... something.
BOOKS
December 6, 1992 | Kristine Mckenna
The catalogue for a photography exhibition that originated at New York's Museum of Modern Art and is now on view at L.A. County Museum of Art through Jan. 24, this book looks at the American home as depicted by 63 contemporary American photographers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2008 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
All the world may be a stage, but Gregory Crewdson's big color photographs manage to flatten it into a backdrop for an overproduced photo shoot. Like ads for luxury cars, pricey perfumes and exotic getaways, Crewdson's 19 nearly 5-by-8-foot inkjet prints at the Gagosian Gallery are less concerned with exploring the world they depict than with selling a fantasy about it. Nothing wrong with that. A compelling illusion can be eye-opening. Unfortunately, Crewdson's meticulously manicured images (in editions of six)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2005 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
An attractive, middle-aged woman stands naked in a motel bathroom. A small amount of blood drips from between her legs to the tile floor, and it seems to have caught her by surprise. She stands frozen in place, as if internally weighing the ramifications. The scene is staged in one of Gregory Crewdson's densely narrative, large color photographs at Gagosian Gallery.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2002 | ARIELLA BUDICK, NEWSDAY
Suburbia, in its ideal form, is a place free from ambiguity. Neat, evenly spaced houses surrounded by kempt green lawns and tidy gardens have stood, in movies, on television and in the popular American consciousness, as symbols of normality and as concrete manifestations of the American Dream. Recently, though, the suburbs have come in for a drubbing. Films such as "American Beauty" and the HBO series "The Sopranos" wallow in the undercurrents of dysfunction beneath the placid reverie.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2002 | SUZANNE MANTELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If ever a gallery artist were ripe for defection to Hollywood, New York photographer Gregory Crewdson is the one. Crewdson, 39, creates large-scale color tableaux of ordinary people in not-quite-right domestic settings. To realize his vision, he brings an entire film crew to his suburban "sets" and spends months in the throes of "post production."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Susan King
The American Cinemathque's Egyptian Theatre gets its boogie on with a triple bill Saturday night of campy skating disco flicks. The first entering the rink is the 1980 cult fave "Xanadu," which was turned into a Broadway musical more than 20 years later. The film stars Olivia Newton-John as a muse sent to Earth, where she helps an artist (Michael Beck) open a roller-disco nightclub. Gene Kelly also stars. "Xanadu" is followed by 1979's "Roller Boogie" with Linda Blair. The triple bill concludes with 1979's "Skatetown, U.S.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
One suspects the world is out of kilter when a French girl utters cultural sacrilege: "Love is stronger than death? What a load of bull. " The girl in question, Camille, has returned from the dead, unbruised and unbloodied and looking just as she did four years earlier, before her school bus rounded a reservoir and sailed off a mountain. She does not devour flesh or walk in spastic shuffles. She's a zombie in the European style, moving with grace, pouting and posing existential questions in a mountain village where the water is rising and animals are up to strange things.
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