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ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2004 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
There have probably been more accessible spots than a West Virginia holler for the launch of a successful film career, but for director Gregory Jacobs it was ideal. While working as a production assistant on director John Sayles' "Matewan" in the fall of 1986, the New York University student made an observation that would help shape his destiny.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
The clever and witty "Criminal," a remake of the Argentine movie "Nine Queens" by first-time director Gregory Jacobs, takes place over one eventful day in the life of two con men who stumble onto the scam of a lifetime, apparently by accident. Except there are no accidents in bunco movies. Rodrigo (Diego Luna) is a Mexican American kid from East L.A. who walks into a drab casino in Gardena and proceeds to pull the well-worn "change for a hundred" routine on a couple of waitresses.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
The clever and witty "Criminal," a remake of the Argentine movie "Nine Queens" by first-time director Gregory Jacobs, takes place over one eventful day in the life of two con men who stumble onto the scam of a lifetime, apparently by accident. Except there are no accidents in bunco movies. Rodrigo (Diego Luna) is a Mexican American kid from East L.A. who walks into a drab casino in Gardena and proceeds to pull the well-worn "change for a hundred" routine on a couple of waitresses.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2004 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
There have probably been more accessible spots than a West Virginia holler for the launch of a successful film career, but for director Gregory Jacobs it was ideal. While working as a production assistant on director John Sayles' "Matewan" in the fall of 1986, the New York University student made an observation that would help shape his destiny.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Fans can soon get more of "Magic Mike": The unlikely hit stripper film staring Channing Tatum and inspired by the actor's life is Broadway bound. "Magic Mike, the Musical" is headed to Broadway, Tatum has confirmed via Twitter . No word on if Tatum will make his Broadway debut reprising the less-than-dressed role for the stage, but the star will serve as a producer. The production has veteran talent backstage. PHOTOS: Hollywood stars on stage Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey, creators of the Tony-winning "Next to Normal," will write the songs, while "Glee" writer Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, who co-wrote the book for "Spider Man: Turn Off the Dark" will pen the book, Deadline.com reports.
NEWS
April 7, 2005 | From Associated Press
Director Steven Soderbergh's latest film lacks star power -- on purpose. The cast of Soderbergh's project, currently being shot in Parkersburg, W.Va., and nearby Belpre, Ohio, is composed entirely of local residents -- all of them non-actors. Instead of holding an open casting call for the movie, tentatively titled "Bubble," the filmmakers looked for residents they thought would best fit the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2007 | Ed Gonzalez, Special to The Times
Next to the 21st century remakes of "The Texas Chain Saw Massacre," "Black Christmas" and "The Hitcher," "Wind Chill" must have appeared hoity-toity to the film's distributor.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a set of pre-shooting guidelines a director came up with for his actors turns out to be cleverer, better written and of considerable more interest than the finished film, that's a bad sign. A very bad sign. The guidelines came to light because of how director Steven Soderbergh shot "Full Frontal." Needing, he's told interviewers, a change of pace from recent logistics-heavy studio films such as "Ocean's Eleven," Soderbergh wanted his next film to be as close to the bone as possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Though there are a few traditional sitcoms on the air these days that are filmed in front of a live studio audience, like CBS' "Two and a Half Men," the three-camera format is more the exception than the rule. These days, the majority of comedies on both the broadcast networks and cable are not studio-bound and are shot in the same method as a drama series -- they are filmed over several days without an audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2002 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"Solaris" accomplishes many if not quite all of its aims, but what it does most of all is reinforce Steven Soderbergh's position as Hollywood's most gifted chameleon, a filmmaker able to operate with elan in all manner of genres. With the divergent "Ocean's Eleven," "Traffic," "Erin Brockovich" and "Out of Sight" on his recent resume, the writer-director now turns to a remake of the Russian science-fiction classic, directed by celebrated Soviet filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky in 1972.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2004
Asylum. Natasha Richardson is a psychiatrist's wife, drawn to patient Marton Csokas at the institution her husband helps run. Ian McKellen also stars. David Mackenzie directs. Paramount Classics, September. The Burial Society. Money laundering and murder drive writer-director Nicholas Racz's twist-filled plot. With Rob LaBelle, David Paymer and Seymour Cassel. Regent Releasing, May. The Butterfly Effect. Emotionally troubled Ashton Kutcher seeks solace in secrets from his childhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Steven Soderbergh's new movie is called "Bubble," which would suggest that somebody -- the characters, the audiences, the filmmakers -- is supposed to be hovering above cold, hard reality in a fragile membrane of some kind. Nothing in the lives depicted on the screen reflects the effervescence of the title, though, and the director stares at his protagonists with such austere, Bressonian intensity it starts to feel impolite after a while.
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