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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2007
A memorial service for animal rights activist and actress Gretchen Wyler, who died May 27, will be held at 4:30 p.m. June 23 at Paramount Studios in Los Angeles. The public is welcome, but RSVPs are required for the service at the Paramount Theater, 5555 Melrose Ave. Those interested may call (818) 501-2275, Ext. 20, and leave a name and phone number, or send e-mail to contact@ hsushollywood.org.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2007
A memorial service for animal rights activist and actress Gretchen Wyler, who died May 27, will be held at 4:30 p.m. June 23 at Paramount Studios in Los Angeles. The public is welcome, but RSVPs are required for the service at the Paramount Theater, 5555 Melrose Ave. Those interested may call (818) 501-2275, Ext. 20, and leave a name and phone number, or send e-mail to contact@ hsushollywood.org.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2007 | Claire Noland, Times Staff Writer
Gretchen Wyler, an actress who left a successful Broadway musical career to dedicate her efforts to protecting animals and eventually became an outspoken critic of the Los Angeles Zoo, has died. She was 75. Wyler died Sunday at her home in Camarillo after a long battle with breast cancer, her friend and fellow activist Catherine Doyle said. Wayne Pacelle, president and chief executive of the Humane Society of the United States, praised her commitment as an animal rights advocate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2007 | Claire Noland, Times Staff Writer
Gretchen Wyler, an actress who left a successful Broadway musical career to dedicate her efforts to protecting animals and eventually became an outspoken critic of the Los Angeles Zoo, has died. She was 75. Wyler died Sunday at her home in Camarillo after a long battle with breast cancer, her friend and fellow activist Catherine Doyle said. Wayne Pacelle, president and chief executive of the Humane Society of the United States, praised her commitment as an animal rights advocate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1987
Frankie L. Trull stated her opinion in her article (Editorial Page, May 3), "There's No Rescue in Bill to Save Pound Animals." That's what she's paid to do, as the director of an organization formed to promote animal research, the National Assn. for Biomedical Research. She would have your readers believe that only animal rights proponents oppose the sale of pets from shelters to laboratories for experiments (called pound seizure). She failed to note that 11 states and four Western European countries prohibit pound seizure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1991
Benjamin Franklin once said that man is known as the "reasoning" animal because he can always find a reason to justify anything he does. Case in point: Gov. Wilson's deplorable veto of Assemblyman Jack O'Connell's bill to ban using the eyes of live rabbits to test for potential irritants in cosmetics and household products (Part A, Sept. 10). Never mind that this crude and archaic procedure--known as the Draise test--can cause painful blistering in the eyes of these helpless animals; that the bill had generated over 75,000 letters of support; that the bill had passed the state Senate by a 22-to-10 vote and the state Assembly by a 52-to-17 margin; that this modest bill would not have applied to any medical research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1996
That extremist anti-hunting groups tried to spoil a terminally ill young man's dream ("Boy's Bear-Hunt Wish Puts Foundation in Cross Hairs," May 11) and tarnish the image of an admirable organization such as the Make-A-Wish Foundation to advance their ill-thought agenda is despicable. The greatest--and most telling--illustration of animal rightists' logic and morality is found in the comments by Gretchen Wyler, president of L.A.-based Ark Trust. Wyler proposed that the young man spend time on the set of a James Bond film--where he can watch people being killed!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1986 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
A 58-year-old woman whose fraudulent home-finding service for unwanted pets was exposed by an animal rights group's "sting" operation was sentenced Thursday to three days in jail for abandoning five dogs in parks after accepting money to find new owners. Whittier Municipal Judge Patricia J.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1996
Celebrities and their pets are slated to appear in "Aardvarks to Zebras," the fifth annual musical tribute to animals benefiting PAWS/LA, at the Pasadena Playhouse on Oct. 7. Jo Anne Worley, Dale Kristien, Charlotte Rae, Kirby Tepper and Gretchen Wyler are among the performers. PAWS/LA is a nonprofit organization that helps people with HIV and AIDS with the care and feeding of their pets. Tickets are $40. Reservations: (310) 657-2929.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1991
Classic Movie Night continues Monday at 7 p.m. at the St. James Club, 8358 Sunset Blvd. with a film clip tribute to Martha Raye, who will be present. Edith Fellows will appear Oct. 14 with "Pennies From Heaven," in which she starred with Bing Crosby. Other guests will be Edie Adams (Oct. 28), Sybil Jason (Nov. 18), Ann Miller (Nov. 25), Gretchen Wyler (Dec. 2) and Betty Garrett (Dec. 9). A special Christmas show is set Dec. 16. Information: (213) 289-0254.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1996
That extremist anti-hunting groups tried to spoil a terminally ill young man's dream ("Boy's Bear-Hunt Wish Puts Foundation in Cross Hairs," May 11) and tarnish the image of an admirable organization such as the Make-A-Wish Foundation to advance their ill-thought agenda is despicable. The greatest--and most telling--illustration of animal rightists' logic and morality is found in the comments by Gretchen Wyler, president of L.A.-based Ark Trust. Wyler proposed that the young man spend time on the set of a James Bond film--where he can watch people being killed!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1991
Benjamin Franklin once said that man is known as the "reasoning" animal because he can always find a reason to justify anything he does. Case in point: Gov. Wilson's deplorable veto of Assemblyman Jack O'Connell's bill to ban using the eyes of live rabbits to test for potential irritants in cosmetics and household products (Part A, Sept. 10). Never mind that this crude and archaic procedure--known as the Draise test--can cause painful blistering in the eyes of these helpless animals; that the bill had generated over 75,000 letters of support; that the bill had passed the state Senate by a 22-to-10 vote and the state Assembly by a 52-to-17 margin; that this modest bill would not have applied to any medical research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1987
Frankie L. Trull stated her opinion in her article (Editorial Page, May 3), "There's No Rescue in Bill to Save Pound Animals." That's what she's paid to do, as the director of an organization formed to promote animal research, the National Assn. for Biomedical Research. She would have your readers believe that only animal rights proponents oppose the sale of pets from shelters to laboratories for experiments (called pound seizure). She failed to note that 11 states and four Western European countries prohibit pound seizure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1986 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
A 58-year-old woman whose fraudulent home-finding service for unwanted pets was exposed by an animal rights group's "sting" operation was sentenced Thursday to three days in jail for abandoning five dogs in parks after accepting money to find new owners. Whittier Municipal Judge Patricia J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1992
We read with great dismay "Zoo Not to Blame in Elephant's Death" (Nov. 5), which noted a recent investigative report that, the article implies, absolved the Los Angeles Zoo of any blame in the death of Hannibal, the healthy, young African bull elephant that died in the early stages of a planned move to a Mexico zoo. This story is an example of public relations manipulation at its worst--an effort to avoid the public condemnation the zoo deserves....
NEWS
March 26, 1999 | BARBARA THOMAS
From spraying red ink on fur coats to placing right-to-know (how your fur was killed) ballots in Beverly Hills, a young generation of radical activists has taken hold of the fashion world. But if change truly comes from within, furriers will take greater note of the Ark Trust's Genesis Awards Saturday when Oleg Cassini will be honored for his anti-fur campaign and the "Evolutionary Fur" he will introduce in October.
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