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Grief

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NATIONAL
November 13, 2010 | By Thomas Curwen, Los Angeles Times
When Gary Ferguson closed his eyes, he could still hear the roar of the river and see the torrent of water as it crashed through boulders and fallen trees. Jane was in the bow, he was in the stern, and the rapids surrounded them. "Paddle hard!" he remembered yelling, as if paddling might have helped. FOR THE RECORD: Grief journey: In a Nov. 14 article in Section A about writer Gary Ferguson's hike to spread the ashes of his wife in the wilderness, a caption under a photograph of a campfire scene identified the man on the left as Steve Muth.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | Karolina Waclawiak
Haunted people wander through cul-de-sacs reeling from small-scale catastrophes or pace through Parisienne arrondissements wishing for different lives in Elizabeth McCracken's "Thunderstruck and Other Stories. " Her second fiction story collection is a stunningly beautiful rumination on loss. "You are so unlucky you don't want to brush up against anyone who isn't," a narrator laments in "Something Amazing. " Sadness is an infection, an allergen, a communicable disease, passing from mother to mother as children are lost or die. McCracken's vapor of misfortune threads around her characters and binds them.
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NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Grief is part of being human, but coping wtih the death of a loved one when you are a teenager is a tricky prospect. And the difficulties only increase if the loved one is not a grandparent, but a peer. When teenagers die in car accidents or as victims of violence, how do the kids left behind cope? And what can their parents do? What are the warning signs that a teen is not coping? For this week's 4Moms conversation , we'll talk with Moises Rodriguez, a psychologist from the Adolescent Medicine Division at Children's Hospital in Los Angeles.
NATIONAL
March 30, 2014 | Maria L. La Ganga and Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Matt Pearce
Volunteer firefighter Jan McClelland, who runs a dairy farm outside this tiny town on the edge of the Cascade Range, was delivering baby goats on the morning of March 22. It was a sunny Saturday in birthing season, filled with the gentle mewling of new life. Summer Raffo, punctual to the core, was heading down State Route 530, passing through Oso on the way to one of her three jobs. She had an appointment to shoe horses in nearby Arlington, and she would not be late. Her anvil was stowed in her blue Subaru.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Red Hook Road A Novel Ayelet Waldman Doubleday: 344 pp., $25.95 Ayelet Waldman is a worrier. Because she is the mother of four children, ages 7 to 16, that shouldn't be surprising. Her last book, "Bad Mother," a work of nonfiction, outlined many of the fears (intimate and not so intimate) that she harbors for each child and for her husband, writer Michael Chabon. It's in her fiction, however, that Waldman really worries the subject of motherhood; gnaws at it, pokes fun at it. Her "Mommy-Track Mysteries" series featured Juliet Applebaum, a criminal defense attorney turned stay-at-home mommy and amateur sleuth practicing her craft, with stroller, on the streets of L.A. Waldman was herself a federal public defender before staying home to raise her children and write.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1999
Re "Pair Files Wrongful Death Suit in Alleged Neglect of Mother, 85," Jan. 11. I would like to add to the letters regarding the Shoreline Care Center in Oxnard. My father has Alzheimer's disease. He has lived at Shoreline Care Center for three years. Our family has become family to the many staff members who care for our Grampa Joe. The staff and administrators spend tedious hours caring for the most tragic illnesses of old age. They try hard, they lift, they bathe and they care for clients with whom they fall in love.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | Karolina Waclawiak
Haunted people wander through cul-de-sacs reeling from small-scale catastrophes or pace through Parisienne arrondissements wishing for different lives in Elizabeth McCracken's "Thunderstruck and Other Stories. " Her second fiction story collection is a stunningly beautiful rumination on loss. "You are so unlucky you don't want to brush up against anyone who isn't," a narrator laments in "Something Amazing. " Sadness is an infection, an allergen, a communicable disease, passing from mother to mother as children are lost or die. McCracken's vapor of misfortune threads around her characters and binds them.
WORLD
December 7, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Members of Nelson Mandela's family spoke for the first time Saturday of their grief at losing a "great man, a pillar of the family," who was always humble, despite his global fame. Mandela's family, deeply sensitive about the intense global media interest in his upcoming funeral, is walking a difficult line between a need for privacy to grieve, and the sense that Mandela belonged to to the world. The family is deeply concerned about the possibility of photographs circulating of Mandela lying in state, according to a spokeswoman for the Government Communication and Information System.
NATIONAL
July 3, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
PRESCOTT, Ariz. - They were simple yet personalized images of grief - shovels, crosses and toy firetrucks - assembled on a chain-link fence that served as the canvas for a town's collective sorrow over its lost crew of firefighters. Many of the memorials came in groups of 19, a grim flourish to symbolize the 19 members of the Granite Mountain hotshots who died Sunday fighting a wildland fire that doubled back on them, consuming them as they scrambled to don a last-ditch layer of protective gear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2009
OPINION
March 27, 2014
Re “Finding healing in music,” Column, March 22 Music as a tool to help children cope with feelings of grief and pain has been shown to be an effective intervention; in fact, even lighthearted group drumming sessions can be of positive benefit. Incorporating sensory integrative activities, such as music, help break down barriers posed by the feelings of fear, frustration, desperation and helplessness that children face when dealing with the loss of a loved one. I underscore Arvis Jones' music therapy methodology as part of a psychosocial grief management recovery process for traumatized children.
SPORTS
March 26, 2014 | By Sam Farmer
ORLANDO, Fla. - The death this week of Ralph Wilson, founder and sole owner of the Buffalo Bills, was but half the heartache of the NFL franchise and its fans. Hall of Fame quarterback Jim Kelly, who led the Bills to four Super Bowl appearances in the early 1990s, found out two weeks ago that the oral cancer he was originally diagnosed with in June has returned. His wife, Jill, wrote on her blog that "the cancer's back, aggressive, and starting to spread. " The 54-year-old Kelly, an icon in western New York, is hospitalized in Manhattan, and has been visited by a steady stream of Bills teammates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | Sandy Banks
How do you help little children, too young to know what death really means, cope with the feelings of grief and pain that the loss of a loved one brings? If you're music therapist Arvis Jones, you let them bang on a drum, do the hokey-pokey or join a choir and sing. Jones is part of a growing professional field that taps the restorative power of music to help traumatized children heal. For 20 years, she's been going to crime scenes, hospitals, funerals and schools, reaching out to grieving families with a bin of unorthodox tools - keyboards, claves, jingle sticks, tambourines, djembe and tubano drums.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Annlee Ellingson
When a loved one dies, sometimes those left behind experience a sort of purgatory themselves, a pause seized by grief. "The Wait" opens with just such a passing of a family matriarch, and a mysterious phone call convinces Emma (Chloë Sevigny) that her mother will rise from the dead like Lazarus. Or Jesus. They just have to wait. Emma's sister Angela (Jena Malone), going through some kind of breakup, finds the situation macabre but uses the break from daily life to reclaim her sense of freedom after a relationship of neglect.
OPINION
January 12, 2014 | By Erika Hayasaki
The day before a 16-year-old friend of mine was murdered, she kissed the window of her white sedan, a birthday gift, leaving cranberry-colored stains on the glass. Then she gave me a hug goodbye. Her name was Sangeeta Lal, and the next morning, her ex-boyfriend shot her. It was April 19, 1995, the same day as the Oklahoma City bombings, and while the world media tuned in to the images of bloody babies and building carcasses left behind by the attack in Oklahoma, I found myself, 16 and a high school newspaper reporter, reporting on my community's own domestic terror.
NEWS
January 3, 2014 | By Carla Hall
Bill de Blasio, the new mayor of New York City, has been getting grief for making a priority of banishing horse-drawn carriages from Central Park in Manhattan. It was one of his campaign promises and he announced at a news conference on Monday - two days before he was sworn in - that the city would “get rid of horse carriages, period. " Let me get this straight: The first week a mayor comes into office, he announces, in no uncertain terms, that he's going to do something he promised to do and do it right away.  Yeah, that's outrageous.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2009
NATIONAL
January 17, 2010 | By Lolly Bowean
Ayodeji Ogunniyi is a teacher who connects with students and stays with them until they absorb a lesson, his mentors and supervisors say. He's new -- he started his first full-time teaching job this month at Thornwood High School in a Chicago suburb -- but he knows he's found his calling. "He was born to teach," said Julie Glaser, an English teacher at Thornwood who supervised Ogunniyi when he was student-teaching. "He has a lot of patience. He likes the students. He enjoys being with them and seeing them grow and learn."
NATIONAL
December 30, 2013 | By David S. Cloud
TRAVIS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. - Shortly after he arrived at Ramstein Air Base in Germany in March 2012, Air Force security guard Trent Smith was at an off-base apartment when, he says, a male sergeant touched him and pressed him to go into the bedroom for sex. "I said, 'No, I don't want to spend the night,'" Smith recalled. But Smith, 20, says he felt he had no choice. "I went along with it. " For Smith, the encounter - which he reported up the chain of command three days later - began an emotional ordeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Robert Abele
For those considering a deep retreat from oppressive holiday cheer, there's Zach Clark's brittle indie confection "White Reindeer. " Anna Margaret Hollyman stars as Suzanne, a chipper real estate agent and devoted wife to her weatherman husband. Suzanne is in good spirits with her beloved yuletide season in full swing, until her spouse's sudden murder - with nearly a month to go before Christmas - sends her into a grief-stricken limbo. As Suzanne explores unearthed secrets about her husband, she seeks out and befriends a single-mom stripper (Laura Lemar-Goldsborough)
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