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July 3, 2003 | Chris Erskine
Here WE ARE, heading back to our favorite butcher shop. To Porterville, Calif., we go. The city that never sleeps. "He was married to one of those women with no lips," says my buddy Irv, "so her lipstick always looked crooked." Irv is weaving stories as we zigzag our way to Porterville, a couple of hours and 50 tall tales from Los Angeles. It's like being on the road with a 45-year-old Tom Sawyer. The speedometer reaches 70. Irv's mouth tops 85.
July 2, 1987 | BETSY BALSLEY, Times Food Editor
Barbecuing is like cooking chili. Each devotee is absolutely, incontrovertibly convinced he or she does it best. It is a personal accomplishment that can be equaled by no one and, of course, each is equally certain that his or her personal recipe for barbecue sauce (usually a tightly held secret) cannot be matched by anyone anywhere. We are talking fanatics here. These are grilling and smoke-cooking experts who have no peers. There's only one way to grill or smoke foods for this group . . . and that's their way!
April 21, 2012 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
Dear SOS: Over the Christmas holiday season, we quartered at the beautiful Heathman Lodge, Vancouver, Wash., to be near relatives in both Oregon and Washington, and enjoyed its renowned Hudson's Bar and Grill . Among other marvelous presentations was its steamed Manila clams. Do you suppose its chef, Brendan Callaghan, would share his recipe? Robert E. Tumelty Seal Beach Dear Robert: Hudson's Grill was happy to share its recipe for steamed Manila clams, which we've adapted below.
October 20, 1996
Regarding "If It Doesn't Move, Grill It!" (by Mary Melton, Sept. 15): Peas porridge hot Peas porridge cold Peas porridge on the grill Leaves me cold! Harron Kelner Chatsworth
March 12, 2008
  Recipe: Bistecca fiorentina (Tuscan steak) Total time: 35 minutes, plus 5 to 6 hours for the steak to reach room temperature Servings: 3 to 4 Note: Allow the steak to sit out in a cool place, loosely covered, for 5 to 6 hours to come to room temperature. You can order this especially thick cut of steak in advance from any fine meat counter or butcher, such as Guss Meat Co., 949 S. Ogden Drive, Los Angeles, (323) 937-4622. 1 (2-inch-thick) porterhouse steak (about 2 1/2 pounds)
June 30, 2012
"Grilling in the summer is a pastime for all to enjoy. Anyone can do it, and it's a great way to bring friends and family together with a simple, easy meal. As long as I can remember, we were a 'grilling family.' My Uncle Howie was on the forefront - it was a passion of his. I have fond memories of him even out in the rain standing his post at the grill. He would create some great meals - all simple and clean in nature, and yet you would think there were 15 ingredients in each item.
Ponzu, a Japanese sauce usually consisting of soy sauce, lemon juice, vinegar and a little sugar, can be a bit tricky to make. Too much of one ingredient can throw off the taste. That's why I was thrilled to find bottled ponzu in the supermarket--there's no trick to opening a bottle. Take five minutes to add a few ingredients to the ponzu and you've got a great glaze for chicken. Serve this with stir-fried bok choy and steamed jasmine rice, and you've got a meal. The glaze also would work well on grilled shrimp or fish.
June 16, 2011 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
  Dear SOS: Have you tried the roasted veggie burger at Upper West in Santa Monica? If you haven't, you must. It is hands down the best veggie burger on the planet. Would love to see if the Los Angeles Times Test Kitchen can come up with the recipe. Carly Irion Santa Monica Dear Carly: Upper West's version of the veggie burger is a wildly flavorful combination of ingredients, packed into a generous patty and grilled to perfection. Served topped with a thick, smoky tomato aioli, roasted piquillo peppers, sliced avocado and a chunky, sweet-tart pineapple relish, this is one burger that might even make a convert out of the most ardent meat lover (at least temporarily)
June 25, 2008
  Naked ribs Some people like barbecue for the sauce; purists like it for the pork. If you're one of the latter, you have to try these ribs, developed by Food editor Russ Parsons. You don't need a smoker to make them, a good old-fashioned kettle grill will work fine. The trick is concentrating the heat along one side of the grill, so that the ribs can slowly smoke on the cool side. Note also that the dry rub spicing mixture makes enough to repeat this recipe three or four times -- in other words, about a week's worth.
April 9, 2003
Please tell me "The Hollywood Lunch" (March 19) was fictional. In this day and age, with the state of the world, it's amazing (and disgusting) that adults act this way. Whatever happened to acting decent and just going about your business? Making "junior" agents give up their tables just because you can proves what Martin Mull once said: "Hollywood is high school with money." Keri Scaggs Pacific Palisades Not only the "industry type" is treated well by Michael Goddard and staff at the Grill.
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