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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1993
According to carefully guarded comments from the Clinton camp, it appears the promised pie in the sky will actually only be grits. WALTER E. KIERNAN Burbank
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Everyone knows Mickey Rooney, but who really remembers the extent of his success? How many now living can testify not only to how large this man loomed over the American film landscape but also to the particular qualities that made him such an enormous success in his prime? Everyone knows Rooney, who died Sunday in Los Angeles at the great age of 93, precisely because he lived so long, the tireless last surviving star of Hollywood's 1930s Golden Age, a performer always ready to make an appearance when there was a crowd waiting to applaud.
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FOOD
October 6, 2004 | Barbara Hansen, Times Staff Writer
Dear SOS: Please see if you can get a recipe for shrimp and grits at Jack Fry's restaurant in Louisville, Ky. It is one of the best things I've eaten. Michelle Phillips Cheviot Hills We wondered if this letter could be from the Michelle Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas fame, so we called the writer and learned that it was indeed the actress-singer looking for a recipe. Phillips, it turns out, is also a skilled cook who can usually detect what's in a restaurant dish and re-create it at home.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Mindy Farrabee
Toward the end of "Half Bad," a debut young adult novel about battling witches by British author Sally Green, readers learn that the protagonist's favorite book is "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich," the 1962 novel about life in a Soviet gulag. Why does he like it so much? another character asks him. "Because [Ivan] survives," he answers flatly. Likening the psychic terrain of young adulthood to a prison camp (where illusions die ignoble deaths and defying authority is a prerequisite for forging one's identity)
NATIONAL
January 8, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A federal judge ordered a sheriff locked up in his own jail after holding him in contempt for failing to adequately feed inmates and profiting from the skimpy meals. U.S. District Judge U.W. Clemon had Morgan County Sheriff Greg Bartlett arrested after testimony from skinny prisoners about paper-thin bologna and cold grits. The sheriff testified that he legally kept as personal income about $212,000 in surplus meal money but denied that inmates were deprived.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
To help transform Matthew McConaughey into a man dying of AIDS, Robin Mathews used grits to simulate a flaky rash in "Dallas Buyers Club. " For a pivotal comb-over scene in "American Hustle," Kathrine Gordon shaved and thinned part of Christian Bale's bushy mane, leaving a patch of hair known as "the island. " And to create the poisonous-fog-induced blisters that break out on Jennifer Lawrence's character in "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire," Ve Neill and her team spent several hours fashioning the boils out of a membrane-thin silicone - in the middle of a Hawaiian jungle.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll    The three artists and their colleagues will be feted Saturday night at a dinner and awards show their guild is throwing for its members for the first time in a decade.
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | CANDACE A. WEDLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unplugged. Unwired. Better yet, LL Cool J unrapped. The rapper-actor kicked back at Roscoe's House of Chicken 'n Waffles--where we ate wings 'n greens--after rehearsing his Marion Hill role on UPN's "In the House." He sipped on an orange and yellow Sun Rise. "Have one," he offered. (His real name is James Todd Smith, born 29 years ago in Queens, New York.) "They're good."
FOOD
April 22, 1993 | JONATHAN GOLD
If the South is once again the cool thing, with an Arkansan in the White House, Garth Brooks at the top of the pop charts and fried green tomatoes on half the restaurant menus in town, Johnny Reb's Southern Smokehouse is the coolest place around, a slapped-together palace of catfish, hushpuppies and chicken-fried steak, barbecue, Dixie Beer, lemonade served in Mason jars, all the salted goobers you can hold.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
To help transform Matthew McConaughey into a man dying of AIDS, Robin Mathews used grits to simulate a flaky rash in "Dallas Buyers Club. " For a pivotal comb-over scene in "American Hustle," Kathrine Gordon shaved and thinned part of Christian Bale's bushy mane, leaving a patch of hair known as "the island. " And to create the poisonous-fog-induced blisters that break out on Jennifer Lawrence's character in "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire," Ve Neill and her team spent several hours fashioning the boils out of a membrane-thin silicone - in the middle of a Hawaiian jungle.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll    The three artists and their colleagues will be feted Saturday night at a dinner and awards show their guild is throwing for its members for the first time in a decade.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | Helene Elliott
SOCHI, Russia - The mystique that surrounded hockey players from the old Soviet Union and Russia vanished when they began to populate NHL locker rooms and win many of the league's most important trophies. The team ethic prevails whether the guy sitting next to you is from Moscow or Moose Jaw. But if the mystery is gone, the contrast in their games remains strong and should be evident when Team USA and Russia face off Saturday before an expected raucous crowd at the Bolshoy Ice Dome.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By Jessica Gelt
There isn't a gang in Los Angeles that the new Fox crime drama "Gang Related" doesn't explore. Russian, Korean, Latino, African American, white and more are brought to vivid, bloody life over the course of the first season, which stars Ramon Rodriguez ("Battle Los Angeles," "The Wire") as Det. Ramon Rodriguez, an ex-gang member who is now part of the elite Los Angeles Gang Task Force. Ryan's past in the Los Angelicos gang is his secret, and it promises to be his undoing as he is forced to reconcile the demons of his past with the demons he fights in his present.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2013 | By Esmeralda Bermudez
The little bistro sits across from King Taco, like David a few yards from Goliath. But Gogo Sweetwine hardly bothers glancing out the window. She's too busy preparing for a table of five: biscuits, grits and gravy, sausage and oatmeal. "Ready to plate!" she announces with a twirl in the kitchen. "Coming through, coming through. " Last year, Sweetwine took a gamble and opened Gogo's Bistro, the only soul food restaurant in Boyle Heights - Los Angeles' iconic Mexican American neighborhood.
SPORTS
October 3, 2013 | Helene Elliott
SALT LAKE CITY - UCLA got an unusually chilly and ominous reception Thursday at Rice-Eccles Stadium. A brief but intense pregame snow squall seemed another bad omen for the shorts-wearing Bruins in a place that was a house of horrors in their previous two visits, a huge loss in 2007 and an icy, embarrassing splat-fest in 2011. “Honestly, I didn't know what I was going to do. I started taping my wrists,” running back Paul Perkins said. “I psyched myself out for it, but when I got out there, it really wasn't that bad.” The squall passed quickly and the Bruins - after some nervous moments that included an onside kick Utah recovered with less than two minutes to play and then drove to UCLA's 23-yard line in the waning seconds - put their nightmares behind them in rallying for a 34-27 victory.
SPORTS
August 21, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
The U.S. Open tennis tournament begins Monday. Describing it is almost as hard as playing in it. It is the most difficult tournament in the world to win, and that certainly includes the other three majors. Australia is friendly, exotic in its distance, a fresh start to a new year. Paris is great food, interminable rallies and dirty socks. Wimbledon is prestige, royalty, stiff upper lips and strawberries and cream. The U.S. Open is everything they aren't. It is New York. Push and shove.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2013 | By August Brown
Apparently Selena Gomez wasn't quite ready to leave the neon-splattered emotional hellscape of "Spring Breakers" just yet. The first sounds one hears on her sassy new album are an oxygen-sucking sub-bass, trap snares and a note to her fellow party nihilists that she only parties this hard on her birthday (and every day is her birthday). It's almost as good as having shorts in every color. "Stars Dance" is exactly the kind of album one makes in 2013 if you want to keep the pop sugar of the Disney tween cabal but mix in some broken glass and a club bathroom nosebleed.
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