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NEWS
January 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The father of a woman raped and murdered--possibly because she was white--has called for racial calm after the arrests of seven black suspects in Charleston, S.C. "Revenge is no way to solve a problem," Clair McLauchlin said. "We don't want anything else horrible to happen." Missy McLauchlin, 25, was crossing the street to a grocery store when she was picked up by several men.
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SPORTS
January 19, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Alabama fullback Robert Stewart was arrested Wednesday night and charged with breaking into a car during the school's basketball game with Kentucky and taking a sweat shirt and a jacket. Coach Bill Curry said he is aware of the arrest and is evaluating Stewart's status. "Robert has been a model citizen for us," the coach said. "He has never been in any trouble up to this point. This is a very serious matter, and we want to be sure of all the facts."
OPINION
August 1, 2003
Re "Putting the Hurt on Coaches," July 29: Once again, I found myself disgusted by a news item. Seems as though people have discovered a way to supplement their incomes: filing frivolous lawsuits against innocent people and others with deep pockets. Whatever happened to personal responsibility? If I trip over my own two left feet at the grocery store, do I have the right to sue the store, claiming that somehow it should have known I was a klutz? If a kid trespasses on my property, patently ignoring my "No Trespassing" or "Dog on Premises" signs and warnings, should I still be held responsible?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2000
Your coverage of Mayor Dave Garofalo of Huntington Beach does a great injustice to a man who commits so much of his energy and life to bettering his community. Garofalo gets a pittance of pay and spends almost all his waking hours in public service only to be nit-picked, slandered and victimized by exaggerated claims and accusations. Although The Times is making it front-page news (June 25), there is nothing new about the charges against Garofalo. He is being attacked for selling ads in his newspaper and visitors guide.
NEWS
January 1, 1986 | Associated Press
A 74-year-old woman whose grocery store has been broken into 13 times shot and killed a would-be robber who wounded her husband, sheriff's deputies said. "I let him have it in the belly," Lillian Speer said. "That's where I thought I shot. I was told later he was shot in the heart." The dead man was identified as Benjamin V. San Jose, 47, an ex-convict with a record for robberies and narcotics offenses going back 20 years, said Sonoma County Sheriff's Sgt. Robert Nelson.
OPINION
March 2, 2014
Re "U.S. to revamp nutrition labels," Business, Feb. 27 Thanks for spotlighting Michelle Obama's campaign to change food labels. I am a registered nurse, and I frequently educate my patients on nutrition. It is indisputable that diet has an impact on health. Still, I have found that the majority of the patients I educate have some deficiency in their knowledge of nutrition. Several patients have expressed to me that they have difficulty navigating through the grocery store attempting to figure out which foods are healthful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2011 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
When Jason Weaver of Anaheim was 15, he told his mother he wanted to join the military. She told him to think about it. Two years later, Patricia Weaver came home to find her son meeting with a recruiter. She told the man to leave. "I said, 'I got one more year with my baby,'" she said. "It was my only child. " But her son persisted. After he graduated from El Dorado High School in Placentia in 2007, he decided to get in shape to join the Army. He lost 60 pounds, quit his job at a local grocery store and enlisted in January 2008.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2009 | By Corina Knoll
Quetzalcoatl and Tlaloc were supposed to live together for at least five years on a Pasadena street corner, coexisting on the side of a Fair Oaks Avenue grocery store. The Aztec deities had come together at the hands of a local artist who -- with the help of a $2,500 city grant -- painted them on a bursting-with-color mural complete with the San Gabriel Mountains and the Arroyo Seco. But last month, in an apparent mix-up, the 60-foot-long, city-sponsored mural was whitewashed out of existence.
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