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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2011
Ross Hagen Actor was a regular on TV's 'Daktari' Ross Hagen, 72, a handsomely rugged actor who was a regular on the 1960s TV series "Daktari" and starred in the low-budget biker movies "The Hellcats" and "The Sidehackers," died of prostate cancer May 7 at home in Brentwood, said Lee Srednick, his partner of seven years. Launching his career in the 1960s with guest shots on TV series such as "The Big Valley" and "The Virginian," Hagen also appeared in the Elvis Presley movie "Speedway" and the motorcycle movie "The Mini-Skirt Mob. " In 1968, he joined the cast of "Daktari," the CBS adventure series starring Marshall Thompson as an American veterinarian running an animal study center in Africa.
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OPINION
September 1, 2010 | By Keith Christman
Over the weekend, Assemblywoman Julia Brownley (D-Santa Monica) and other supporters of the bill to ban plastic grocery bags (AB 1998) attempted to make the legislation more palatable to state senators, who will decide the bill's fate soon. The amendments they made to win over reluctant senators actually prove that Brownley's bill would hurt working families, put people out of good jobs and create an expensive new bureaucracy when California has far more pressing problems to solve. The amendments added behind closed doors shine a spotlight on the major weaknesses of the legislation.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Arden Group Inc., the Compton parent of the upscale Gelson's Markets chain, said Monday that it is considering selling the company or looking into other options. Board members “initiated a process to explore and evaluate strategic alternatives, which may include a possible sale,” the company said in a statement. Arden, which owns 16 Gelson's across Southern California, said it retained Moelis & Co. as its sole financial adviser during the review. The supermarket chain said it hadn't made a decision to pursue any specific moves and said it had “no defined timeline” for its evaluation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
Bernard Gelson, who pioneered upscale grocery shopping in Southern California as the co-founder of Gelson's Markets, has died. He was 84. Gelson, who had been in failing health, died Monday of pneumonia at his home in Encino, said his wife, Ellyn. Gelson was born in Sioux City, Iowa, on Jan. 29, 1920. He and his younger brother, Eugene, learned the grocery business from their parents, who ran a small store.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Albertsons Inc. has received a preliminary takeover bid from larger grocery store rival Kroger Co., while its drugstore unit has attracted bids from three pharmacy chains, sources familiar with the situation told Reuters on Friday. Albertsons put itself up for sale in September after struggling against competition from discounters such as Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1985 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Price Co., which operates 21 discount warehouse stores in four states, on Friday said that it is negotiating with a Montreal-based retail chain to form a joint venture to open and operate an undisclosed number of Price Clubs in Canada. The San Diego-based company is discussing the joint-venture proposal with Steinberg Inc., which operates grocery and retail stores in Canada and the United States. The discussions could be concluded "shortly," according to a Price Co.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2013 | By Marina Villeneuve
WASHINGTON - Empty Budweiser beer cans, Arizona iced tea bottles and other debris litter the ground of a largely vacant strip mall in the Skyland neighborhood, an area federally designated as a "food desert" for its lack of grocery stores. Skyland is part of the District of Columbia's Ward 7, where a majority of residents are low-income African Americans and the unemployment rate is 13.9%. A few miles away, the affluent, mainly white Ward 3 has numerous grocery stores and a 2.1% jobless rate.
OPINION
November 26, 2003
The Teamsters' announcement that they will refuse to deliver to the grocery stores beginning a few days before Thanksgiving is a classic example of why unions lack public support (Nov. 25). Their disregard for the effects of their actions on others reinforces my perception of unions as groups of aloof, self-centered bullies. I have been asked to forgo convenience and choice for the last two months; now I am expected to accept a holiday food shortage for the purpose of gaining an attractive benefit package for grocery workers.
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