Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGroucho
IN THE NEWS

Groucho

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1989
Dan Sullivan's review of the play, "Groucho a Life in Revue," by my brother, Arthur Marx, is quite accurate (" 'Groucho in Revue': It Takes All Night to Hit Its Marx," Oct. 4). I too was bothered by the high-pitched voice that Frank Ferrante used when portraying my father, Groucho, as a young man. However, I must take exception to his comment that Groucho didn't appear winded after doing a jitterbug routine at the age of 50. Frank Ferrante's portrayal was completely accurate because I remember my father frequently doing a Russian dance called the kozatki around the house where he would squat down and extend one leg and then the other in time to the music and even when he was several years older, he never once showed any sign of being winded.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
February 23, 2013 | Chris Erskine
Like to laugh, don't care why or where. Don't care the occasion, formal or otherwise, though the formal ones always - to quote Jack Nicholson - "bring out the devil in me. " Like to laugh with people and at people and for people, which is what I found myself doing the other night, laughing in support of the National Lampoon's new stage show, playing for the next month at a little theater near MacArthur Park, a landmark probably best known for...
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1998 | STEVE HARVEY
The Marx who is usually associated with communism is Karl. But in the 1950s the FBI investigated whether the somewhat funnier Marx--Groucho--was a member of the Communist Party, according to an article in The Nation magazine. The author, UC Irvine professor Jon Wiener, found that the agency's crack operatives had some trouble spelling the comic's first name.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Initially known for such obsessive noirs as "Laura" and "Fallen Angel," Otto Preminger enjoyed a long run in the 1950s and '60s as one of Hollywood's most ambitious practitioners of the issue movie. Driven to dramatize big social-political themes and the largest institutions of public life, he tackled drug addiction ("The Man With the Golden Arm"), the legal system ("Anatomy of a Murder"), the state of Israel ("Exodus"), Beltway duplicity ("Advise & Consent"), the Catholic Church ("The Cardinal")
SPORTS
July 19, 2008
Memo to letter writer Jim Freed [July 12]: It was Chico Marx (dressed as Groucho), who asked, "Who you gonna believe, me or your own eyes?" You don't have to believe me, though. Watch "Duck Soup" and see it for your own eyes. Elton Brand might prefer this Groucho quote, however: "I got a good mind to join a club and beat you over the head with it." Jason Winston Riverside
OPINION
June 6, 1993
The media should ease up on President Clinton. Just like Yeltsin, he has a difficult job in coping with a Marxist legacy. Yes, Reagan and Bush where Marxists: not followers of Karl but of Groucho. JACK W. JONES Orange
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2004
I just finished the truly wonderful column on the DVD sets of the Marx Brothers and W.C. Fields ("Their Timing is Just Perfect ... as Usual," Dec. 5). Robert Lloyd captured their wit and art with great skill. These comics used the power of language brilliantly. At the end of "Duck Soup," Margaret Dumont sings an operatic aria toasting war, while Groucho savages the enemy. When someone asks him what he's doing, he points to Margaret and says, "I'm fighting for her honor, which is more than she ever did."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1992
I tuned in an hour early and found a wonderful show on the Fox network; it was a show consisting of clips of past Emmy shows. It had real celebrities and funny people that entertained the audience and made them smile. They didn't spend the evening feeling sorry for themselves if their shows were canceled. How lucky we were, having seen the likes of Groucho, Jimmy Durante, Lucy, Danny Thomas and the wonderful Jack Benny. You all are sorely missed and remind us time and again how great you were.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1987
Here's a note to letter-writer Steve Stoliar (Aug. 30): A lot of us remember Groucho every day of the year, not just on Aug. 19, the day he died. He was a genius. My son is being raised by the Worldview According to Groucho (and Harpo and Chico)--a kid could do worse. As for Messrs. Alberti and Wallis and their gratuitous digs at the Beatles: Let's not get carried away, folks! When you put down the Beatles simply to be fashionable or hip, you betray a wide, gaping hole in your musical sensibility--the music of Lennon and McCartney is beautiful and everlasting.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1999 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The difficulty in staging a Marx Brothers vehicle these days is, of course, that it's awfully hard to lure those boys out of retirement. So you try to find actors who can deliver convincing impersonations of Groucho, Chico, Harpo and Zeppo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Arthur Marx, a veteran television writer, playwright, celebrity biographer and memoirist who wrote extensively about an often fractious life with his father, comedic legend Groucho Marx, has died. He was 89 and died of natural causes Thursday at his Los Angeles home, said his son, Andy. Marx was the only son of Groucho, who, with his exaggerated eyebrows, mustache and mastery of the lightning-quick, ad-libbed putdown, was the most prominent member of the Marx Brothers. "His father was never far from him," said actor Frank Ferrante, who portrayed the iconic comedian in the 1986-87 off-Broadway production of "Groucho: A Life in Revue," written by Marx and Robert Fisher.
HOME & GARDEN
March 2, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Update: The Beverly Hills home where former owner Groucho Marx left his marks ? initials carved into concrete on the driveway and near the pool ? has sold for $5.8 million, the Multiple Listing Service shows. The 1927 Spanish-style estate had been maintained by the same family for the last half-century. The two-story residence has about 6,000 square feet of living space on more than an acre of grounds with a swimming pool and mature trees, including some fruit trees that Marx planted.
HOME & GARDEN
June 23, 2010 | Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
A longtime home of film comic Groucho Marx is listed in Beverly Hills at $6,995,000. The Spanish-style estate has been maintained by the same family for the last half-century. Marx's initials are carved into the concrete in two spots — the driveway and near the pool. A copper storage unit that the actor made in the upstairs office to store his signature cigars is intact. Fruit trees that he planted remain on the property. Marx was interviewed by Edward R. Murrow in the house in the '50s.
HOME & GARDEN
September 5, 2009 | LAUREN BEALE
Pop star Natasha Bedingfield, who launched her own British invasion of the U.S. airwaves with such often-played hits as "Unwritten," has purchased a home in the Los Feliz area for $2.3 million. The London-born singer-songwriter bought a 4,792-square-foot contemporary with four bedrooms, 5 1/2 bathrooms, a media room, gym and office in three stories. The recently renovated house, built in 1953, has city light and mountain views. There is a swimming pool and a detached three-car garage with a guesthouse above.
SPORTS
July 19, 2008
Memo to letter writer Jim Freed [July 12]: It was Chico Marx (dressed as Groucho), who asked, "Who you gonna believe, me or your own eyes?" You don't have to believe me, though. Watch "Duck Soup" and see it for your own eyes. Elton Brand might prefer this Groucho quote, however: "I got a good mind to join a club and beat you over the head with it." Jason Winston Riverside
SPORTS
February 24, 2007 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
It was a different time, but it could apply to today's sports world. Professor Quincy Wagstaff, the newly appointed president of Huxley College, addressing two professors, asks, "Do we have a university? Do we have a football team?" When the professors say, "Yes," Wagstaff replies, "Well, we can't afford both. Tomorrow we start tearing down the university." The above is from the 1932 Marx brothers movie "Horse Feathers." The role of Wagstaff is played by Groucho Marx.
HOME & GARDEN
February 23, 2013 | Chris Erskine
Like to laugh, don't care why or where. Don't care the occasion, formal or otherwise, though the formal ones always - to quote Jack Nicholson - "bring out the devil in me. " Like to laugh with people and at people and for people, which is what I found myself doing the other night, laughing in support of the National Lampoon's new stage show, playing for the next month at a little theater near MacArthur Park, a landmark probably best known for...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1986
Does Elizabeth Venant mean to say that all "conceptual work, combining image and text" is to be associated with Marxist theory ("Portrait of an Art School in Ferment," May 4)? It sounds that way. However, she didn't ask me anything about my practice and I've been working with image and text since 1967. To be fair to Venant, she surely would know better than to include the Egyptians' hieroglyphics in such a generalization. Nor Grunewald, whose "Eisenheim Altarpiece" renders the words of St. John the Baptist alongside the crucified body of Jesus Christ.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2005 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Robert Dwan, who directed Groucho Marx throughout the entire 14-year run of his popular "You Bet Your Life" quiz show on radio and television, has died. He was 89. Dwan died Friday of complications related to pneumonia at Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center, his family said. "You Bet Your Life," which debuted on radio in 1947 and aired on television from 1950 to 1961, provided an ideal format for Marx's rapier wit as he interviewed contestants before they played a question-and-answer quiz.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|