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BUSINESS
February 17, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
New Chinese owners are set to break ground on a sprawling hotel and residential complex that's expected to alter L.A.'s skyline and cement a growing Asian footprint in downtown Los Angeles. Moving at a pace rare in Southern California development, owner Greenland Group of Shanghai vowed Friday to start work shortly on the first phase of a $1-billion project that will be constructed on a vast parking lot along the Harbor Freeway just north of Staples Center and LA Live. Known as Metropolis Los Angeles, the development will feature a 38-story residential skyscraper and a four-star luxury hotel.
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OPINION
February 16, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Ever since a wave of conservative insurgents arrived in Washington after the congressional election of 2010, Congress has careened from one tea party-inspired fiscal crisis to another, from the debt-ceiling showdown of 2011 to last year's 16-day government shutdown. But last week, when the debt ceiling needed to be raised again, conservative Republicans decided not to fight. They still voted no, but they meekly stood aside to let the ceiling rise. "You've got to know when to hold them and when to fold them," Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.)
IMAGE
February 16, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
NEW YORK - If the menswear collections coming down the runways at the recently wrapped New York Fashion Week are any indication, fall 2014 is going to be filled with laid-back luxe - unconstructed, blanket-like outerwear, chunky novel knitwear and a quilted one of everything. But the biggest trend coming off the runway - and what might really be a game-changing look for the American male of nine months hence - is the upscale take on the lowly sweat pant. Sure, there were plenty of sharp tailored suits to go around, as well as softer versions of traditional menswear suiting in fabrics including Glen plaids, herringbone and houndstooth.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2014 | By Andrew Hill
How to get big - without getting bloated - is one of the greatest challenges facing growing businesses. Start-ups want to know how they can expand without adding layers of deadening process. At the same time, large companies want to know how to replicate the creativity and innovative prowess of start-ups without triggering an anarchic free-for-all. Drawing on the authors' own and others' insights, "Scaling Up Excellence: Getting to More Without Settling for Less" promises many answers to those pressing questions.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2014 | By Kenneth R. Harney
WASHINGTON - Parents, grandparents and young adults know the problem only too well: Heavy student-debt loads, persistent employment troubles stemming from the recession, plus newly toughened mortgage underwriting standards are all standing in the way of vast numbers of potential first-time home buyers in their 20s and 30s. But are there effective techniques that family members, friends, even employers can use to bridge the generational gap by...
BUSINESS
February 16, 2014 | Michael Hiltzik
The most sinister video you're likely to find online just now comes from people who oppose online gambling. "Disreputable gaming interests are lobbying hard to spread Internet gambling throughout the country," a voice over intones. Cue the grainy black-and-white footage of something sketchy going on in an alleyway, the ominous music and allusions to criminal "syndicates" and terrorism. The narrator warns that "an established Al Qaeda poker network could extract enough untraceable money from the United States in just a few days to fund several 9/11-sized attacks.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By David Pierson
The developing world has largely usurped U.S. manufacturing, but emerging economies are increasingly big customers of American farmers. Between 2000 and 2013, American fruit, grain, meat and dairy sold overseas nearly tripled to $140.9 billion, making agricultural products one of the hottest exports in the last decade, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture report released Wednesday. Developing countries with growing middle-class populations and strengthening currencies powered the binge on U.S. food, which has been a boon for California almond growers, Iowa soybean farmers and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By Susan King
News of Shirley Temple Black's death Monday night brought back wonderful memories for me, of my childhood and my early love of Hollywood. Shirley Temple was one of my early obsessions. From the age of 5, I would watch and watch her movies from "Bright Eyes" to "Poor Little Rich Girl" to my favorite "The Little Princess. " My mother was my Temple enabler so to speak. She had turned on the television one Saturday afternoon when we were living in Miami to "Shirley Temple Theater," a weekly showcase of her classic films.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2014 | Paloma Esquivel
Kianna Jackson disappeared first. The 20-year-old called her mother on Oct. 2 and told her she was taking the bus to Santa Ana from her home in Las Vegas for a court date. The next day she stopped answering her phone. Twenty days later, Monique Vargas, a 34-year-old mother of three, left her sister's birthday party, telling family she was walking to the market to buy groceries. They haven't seen her since. Another 20 days later, Martha Anaya, 28, asked her boyfriend to pick up their young daughter because she had to work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2014 | By Jean Merl
More than a week after Rep. Henry A. Waxman touched off a political earthquake with his retirement announcement, aftershocks are rippling across his Westside-South Bay district. State Sen. Ted Lieu of Torrance and former L.A. Controller Wendy Greuel, two Democrats who jumped in to vie for the seat shortly after Waxman said he wouldn't seek another term, have put together prestigious campaign teams and were racing to lock up endorsements. They've also been raising money. Attorney Barbara Mulvaney, another Democrat, joined the contest last week as a first-time candidate.
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