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NATIONAL
November 8, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano, Los Angeles Times
Army Pvt. Steve Spofford heard the news at a 6 a.m. roll call on the U.S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. "Foraker!" the platoon sergeant called out. Silence. "Foraker!" Standing in formation, Spofford felt his mind racing. It was not at all like Staff Sgt. Ryan D. Foraker to be missing. Where could he be? No one disappears from Guantanamo, Spofford thought, least of all the soldiers in charge of guarding the captives taken during the war on terrorism. But after a search of the base and the bay that was launched that morning of Sept.
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NATIONAL
April 15, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - The military judge in the Sept. 11 conspiracy case signaled Tuesday he may order FBI agents to describe their secret investigation into whether members of the defense teams for Al Qaeda leader Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and others illegally leaked a “manifesto” written by the alleged 9/11 mastermind about his time at the Guantanamo Bay prison. The judge, Army Col. James L. Pohl, asked defense lawyers for Mohammed and four other alleged conspirators to notify him by 5 p.m. Wednesday which FBI agents and other government officials they want him to question as part of the probe.
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NATIONAL
February 20, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - A Guantanamo Bay prisoner who was a relative of one of the Sept. 11 hijackers pleaded guilty Thursday in the bombing attack of a French oil tanker off the coast of Yemen. Top military officials pointed to the plea as an example of the efficiency of the war crimes tribunals at the U.S. military prison in Cuba, though critics noted that the majority of terrorism suspects held there are still in legal limbo awaiting trial. Ahmed Darbi pleaded guilty during a court arraignment in what would have been the start of his military trial.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2014 | By Richard Serrano
WASHINGTON - Ali Ahmad Razihi, accused of being a former bodyguard to Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, hopes someday to leave the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay and return to Yemen, where he plans to marry and help his family in their fruit and vegetable farm. At a hearing Thursday to decide whether he should get his wish, U.S. military lawyers said they couldn't say with certainty whether he remained a threat to this country. Razihi appeared at the Pentagon's latest Periodic Review Board hearing, becoming only the third Guantanamo detainee to do so. The hearings, begun by the Obama administration as a way to gradually empty and close the prison in Cuba, are giving half of the roughly 150 prisoners a chance to be moved to a list of detainees eligible for release.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2012 | By David G. Savage
Washington - The Supreme Court made clear Monday it is not willing to closely review the claims of the remaining Guantanamo Bay detainees, as the justices turned down appeals from seven inmates without comment. The court has left it to the Obama administration and federal judges in Washington to decide whether the detainees can be held indefinitely as military prisoners. Advocates for the detainees said they were disappointed. “The court has effectively abandoned its commitment to ensuring that individuals held in long-term detention at Guantanamo obtain meaningful review of their imprisonment,” said Jonathan Hafetz, a law professor at Seton Hall University in New Jersey.
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Esperanza Spalding, guest blogger, This post has been updated and corrected, see below.
I finally read all of Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Letter From Birmingham Jail" this spring while I was on tour for my album "Radio Music Society. " At about the same time, the hunger strike at Guantanamo Bay detention center hit the headlines. Soon, scores of men were being force-fed. The more I learned about what was going on at Guantanamo, the more I realized that the truths King expressed in his famous letter were back in our faces: "Justice too long delayed is justice denied. " I vowed to do something.
NATIONAL
July 24, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON - Sharp disagreement over the future of the Guantanamo Bay detention camp dominated the first Senate hearing on the issue in four years. The meeting Wednesday of a Senate Judiciary Committee subcommittee, held in the wake of a high-profile hunger strike by inmates and renewed calls from President Obama to close the facility, made clear that deep partisan divisions remain over whether keeping the prison open is a threat to national security or a necessity. Opened at a U.S. Navy base in Cuba in the months after the Sept.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A terrorist suspect held at the U.S. prison camp in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, is to be released after a panel found that he was not an enemy combatant, while 73 others were ordered to remain in custody, officials said. No details were given on the detainee, who would be freed following preparations between the United States and his government, said Navy Capt. Beci Brenton, a Pentagon spokeswoman.
NATIONAL
May 4, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano
Early Saturday morning in a courtroom inside the highly guarded detainee prison at the U.S. Naval Base at  Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, five of the alleged top plotters in the Sept. 11 attacks will speak for the first time under a new Obama administration plan to hold them accountable under military tribunals for the worst terrorist strikes in America. It will be a test for the prisoners, including alleged Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, of whether to plead guilty or not guilty at the arraignment hearing -- and whether to use the occasion as a platform to denounce the United States and call for more terrorist attacks around the world.
OPINION
May 28, 2006
Re "No more excuses," editorial, May 22 The U.S. detainee facility at Guantanamo Bay now stands as a symbol of American resolve in the war on terror. Closing it would send a message of surrender to the terrorists, demonstrating to them that their propaganda is effective. Who can doubt that the recent spate of suicide attempts and the following uprising were orchestrated by the detainees to make news? This is an old terrorist trick. The detainees at Gitmo are suspected enemy combatants.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- It was movie time at the guesthouse in Afghanistan, but this was no regular guesthouse, and it was no regular movie.  Once you checked in, you couldn't leave. Osama bin Laden was a visitor. Rooms were stocked with Al Qaeda books. And attendance was mandatory when staff wheeled in a TV in the spring of 2001 and showed "The Destruction of the American Destroyer USS Cole," about the October 2000 attack that killed 17 U.S. sailors.   One of the young men watching the movie was Sahim Alwan, a witness in the trial of alleged Al Qaeda propagandist Sulaiman abu Ghaith, which enters its second week Monday.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - A man whose friend died in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks was among potential jurors excused Monday from serving on the trial of Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, Sulaiman abu Ghaith, an alleged Al Qaeda propagandist accused of conspiring to kill Americans. The opening day of jury selection shed light on the effects the 2001 attacks had on some New Yorkers, even those who did not know people wounded or killed. Some potential jurors said they were not sure they could be impartial, given their memories of Sept.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Weeks after he took office, President Obama met privately with 40 grieving Americans, many clutching photographs of loved ones lost in terrorist attacks. The new president told them he would be closing Guantanamo Bay military prison within the year and putting many of the detainees there on trial in the U.S., where justice would be swifter. Five years later, the first and probably only federal court trial of a Sept. 11-related case will start with jury selection on Monday at a U.S. District courthouse in Lower Manhattan, blocks from ground zero, where the World Trade Center once stood.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge Friday refused to halt or dismiss the case against Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, saying that suggestions the government had charged the wrong man were “utterly meritless” and ruling that the first Sept. 11-related trial to be held in New York will open with jury selection on Monday. Defense lawyers for Sulaiman abu Ghaith had filed a last-minute request for a delay in the trial or dismissal of the case altogether, claiming they had uncovered evidence that another man, a detainee at Guantanamo Bay, is the actual person who was the top Al Qaeda propagandist and warned of more airplane attacks.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2014 | By Richard Serrano
WASHINGTON - Days before his Sept. 11-related terrorism trial begins in New York, accused Al Qaeda propagandist Sulaiman Abu Ghaith again asked a federal judge to dismiss or postpone the proceedings, contending the government had charged the wrong man. In a federal court filing made public Thursday, Ghaith's attorneys said newly obtained evidence suggests a second individual with a similar name and past, who is currently incarcerated at Guantanamo Bay,...
OPINION
February 27, 2014 | By Karen J. Greenberg
In Barack Obama's first weeks in office, in a series of executive orders and public statements, the new president and former professor of constitutional law promised to make sweeping changes in the way government operated in a number of specific areas. But has he kept his pledges? Let's consider four of them: Ending torture On his first day in office, Obama ordered an end to the practice of torture, or as the George W. Bush administration preferred to call it, "enhanced interrogation techniques.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2006 | TIM RUTTEN
THE Defense Department's expulsion of four journalists reporting from the prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, this week is another reminder of how the Bush administration's construction of an American gulag has undermined this country's ability to prosecute the global struggle against Islamo-fascist terrorism. The four, including The Times' Carol J. Williams, had been covering the suicides last weekend of three prisoners, who hanged themselves in their cells.
SPORTS
February 21, 2014 | By Steve Dilbeck
Poor Andre Ethier, we knew him well. Hope he enjoys his next stop in Houston, or Siberia, or Guantanamo Bay, or wherever he's headed. If you're a Dodger, there are just certain things in life you never do. You don't take the last plate of pasta away from Tommy Lasorda, you don't criticize Vin Scully and you never, ever do any harm to Sandy Koufax. Alas, Ethier is now guilty of the third, and it's too bad, because I always kinda liked him, whichever Ethier he was that day. But Friday during batting practice at Camelback Ranch in Arizona, Ethier had the misfortune of sending a line drive off the head of Koufax . Amazingly, no blue bolt crackled from the heavens to strike Ethier down.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - A Guantanamo Bay prisoner who was a relative of one of the Sept. 11 hijackers pleaded guilty Thursday in the bombing attack of a French oil tanker off the coast of Yemen. Top military officials pointed to the plea as an example of the efficiency of the war crimes tribunals at the U.S. military prison in Cuba, though critics noted that the majority of terrorism suspects held there are still in legal limbo awaiting trial. Ahmed Darbi pleaded guilty during a court arraignment in what would have been the start of his military trial.
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