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Guantanamo Naval Base

NATIONAL
October 14, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
A complex of canvas Quonset huts arrayed like dominoes has risen on an abandoned airfield here, where just a year ago the Pentagon envisioned a $125-million permanent judicial center in which terrorism suspects would be brought to trial. The battlefield-style Expeditionary Legal Complex, which can be quickly dismantled once the war-crimes tribunals of the Guantanamo detainees are over, reflects the shrinking mission of the controversial procedures created by the Military Commissions Act of 2006.
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NATIONAL
October 12, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Attempted murder charges were filed this week against a 22-year-old Afghan imprisoned here for nearly five years, accusing him of trying to kill a U.S. soldier by lobbing a grenade into his car, the Pentagon announced Thursday. The indictment of Mohammed Jawad was the fourth brought against the 330 or so prisoners at the U.S.
NATIONAL
October 6, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
miami -- The chief prosecutor for the Guantanamo military commissions has resigned, raising the prospect of further delays in the Bush administration's six-year effort to bring prisoners in the war on terrorism to trial. The Pentagon confirmed Friday that Air Force Col. Morris Davis, a steadfast supporter of the controversial detention and judicial processes at the U.S. Naval Base in southern Cuba, had asked to be relieved of his duties.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
washington -- A decision Monday night by a military court of review will pave the way for the Pentagon to restart its terrorism tribunals for detainees held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The appeals panel, the U.S. Court of Military Commission Review, ruled that the commissions set up by Congress and the Defense Department did have jurisdiction to decide whether Omar Khadr was an unlawful enemy combatant.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2007 | Noam N. Levey, Times Staff Writer
A lightning rod for international criticism, the U.S. detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, not long ago appeared headed for closure. President Bush and his top advisors said they wanted to shutter the controversial lockup. But the latest attempt to shut it down is facing collapse: The detention facility has been embraced by many Republicans as a potent political symbol in their quest to seize the terrorism issue ahead of next year's elections.
WORLD
August 19, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The government has granted political asylum to 29 Cubans held at the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the news agency MTI reported. U.S. forces have been holding 44 Cubans caught at sea and have been looking for countries willing to take them. Seventeen of them ended a three-week hunger strike after learning of Hungary's decision, MTI said. Hungary's Foreign Ministry reportedly said that the U.S.
NATIONAL
July 21, 2007 | From the Associated Press
When Guantanamo Bay detainees challenge their designation as "enemy combatants," judges must receive all the evidence, not just what the military chose to present at the detainees' status review tribunals, a federal appeals court ruled Friday. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit rejected the Bush administration's plan to limit what judges and the detainees' attorneys can review when considering whether the Combatant Status Review Tribunals acted appropriately.
WORLD
July 17, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Sixteen Saudis from the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, arrived home and were immediately detained by authorities investigating possible terrorist connections, the official Saudi Press Agency reported. A total of 77 Saudis have now been returned from Guantanamo, Maj. Gen. Mansour Turki told the press agency. He said 53 remain at the U.S. military facility in Cuba. A Pentagon spokesman, Navy Cmdr. Jeffrey D. Gordon, confirmed that the detainees had been transferred.
NATIONAL
July 7, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The Pentagon said it had appealed a decision by a military judge to dismiss the case of Omar Ahmed Khadr, a Guantanamo Bay detainee accused of killing an American soldier in Afghanistan. It is the first time that the appeals process has been used since it was created by Congress in late 2006 to handle cases involving Guantanamo detainees.
NATIONAL
June 30, 2007 | David G. Savage and Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writers
In a surprise move, the Supreme Court agreed Friday to consider whether prisoners at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, had been wrongly held for years without a fair chance to plead their innocence. In a brief order before adjourning for the summer, the justices announced they would hear an appeal that in April they had refused to hear. The case asks whether "foreign citizens imprisoned indefinitely" by the U.S.
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