Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGuantanamo Naval Base
IN THE NEWS

Guantanamo Naval Base

NATIONAL
December 7, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
In the weeks after Sept. 11, Salim Ahmed Hamdan -- Osama bin Laden's driver -- helped the Al Qaeda leader evade capture and applauded his quest to destroy the United States, witnesses told a military panel here Thursday. Prosecutors seeking to prove that the Yemeni native should be considered an unlawful enemy combatant said that Hamdan had two surface-to-air missiles in his car when he was captured in southern Afghanistan in November 2001.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
December 5, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Despite sweeping measures to prevent suicides among the 305 prisoners here, a detainee slashed his throat with a sharpened fingernail recently and might have bled to death if guards hadn't rushed to his aid, officers disclosed here Tuesday. The apparent suicide attempt last month in a shower at maximum-security Camp 6 was one of dozens known to have occurred since prisoners were first brought to the military prison nearly six years ago.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
The rules governing war-crimes trials here require defense lawyers and prosecutors to inform each other of witnesses they will call and evidence they will present at the military commissions. But the vague guidance on the process known as discovery doesn't impose any obligation to make timely disclosures. Nor does it oblige the government to make its witnesses available to the defense for pretrial interviews. Unique to the tribunal system that is governed by neither U.S.
WORLD
November 13, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Nearly 50 flights to or from the U.S. military prison for terrorism suspects at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, passed through Spain's air space or landed in the country from 2002 until as recently as February, a report said. The Spanish government previously acknowledged only one such flight, insisting that it had not colluded with the CIA's program of "extraordinary rendition," in which terrorism suspects have been flown secretly to far-flung detention centers.
WORLD
November 7, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A federal appeals court Tuesday refused to block military commission proceedings against a Canadian detainee at Guantanamo Bay. Lawyers for Omar Khadr had asked the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to halt the case, in which Khadr is charged with murder for allegedly throwing a grenade that killed a Special Forces soldier in a firefight in Afghanistan. Khadr, who was 15 when he was captured in Afghanistan in 2002, also faces conspiracy and other charges.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2007 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
The FBI is quietly reconstructing the cases against Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and 14 other accused Al Qaeda leaders being held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, spurred in part by U.S. concerns that years of CIA interrogation have yielded evidence that is inadmissible or too controversial to present at their upcoming war crimes tribunals, government officials familiar with the probes said.
NATIONAL
October 14, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
A complex of canvas Quonset huts arrayed like dominoes has risen on an abandoned airfield here, where just a year ago the Pentagon envisioned a $125-million permanent judicial center in which terrorism suspects would be brought to trial. The battlefield-style Expeditionary Legal Complex, which can be quickly dismantled once the war-crimes tribunals of the Guantanamo detainees are over, reflects the shrinking mission of the controversial procedures created by the Military Commissions Act of 2006.
NATIONAL
October 12, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Attempted murder charges were filed this week against a 22-year-old Afghan imprisoned here for nearly five years, accusing him of trying to kill a U.S. soldier by lobbing a grenade into his car, the Pentagon announced Thursday. The indictment of Mohammed Jawad was the fourth brought against the 330 or so prisoners at the U.S.
NATIONAL
October 6, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
miami -- The chief prosecutor for the Guantanamo military commissions has resigned, raising the prospect of further delays in the Bush administration's six-year effort to bring prisoners in the war on terrorism to trial. The Pentagon confirmed Friday that Air Force Col. Morris Davis, a steadfast supporter of the controversial detention and judicial processes at the U.S. Naval Base in southern Cuba, had asked to be relieved of his duties.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The Supreme Court on Monday refused to hear the case of a Guantanamo detainee challenging the legality of the military commission system that plans to try him on charges of war crimes. Detainee Salim Ahmed Hamdan, who once was the driver for Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, is accused of conspiracy and supporting terrorism. Hamdan had sought to combine his case with a separate challenge the Supreme Court is considering regarding detainees at the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|