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Guantanamo Naval Base

NATIONAL
September 24, 2007 | Noam N. Levey, Times Staff Writer
A lightning rod for international criticism, the U.S. detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, not long ago appeared headed for closure. President Bush and his top advisors said they wanted to shutter the controversial lockup. But the latest attempt to shut it down is facing collapse: The detention facility has been embraced by many Republicans as a potent political symbol in their quest to seize the terrorism issue ahead of next year's elections.
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WORLD
August 19, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The government has granted political asylum to 29 Cubans held at the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the news agency MTI reported. U.S. forces have been holding 44 Cubans caught at sea and have been looking for countries willing to take them. Seventeen of them ended a three-week hunger strike after learning of Hungary's decision, MTI said. Hungary's Foreign Ministry reportedly said that the U.S.
NATIONAL
July 21, 2007 | From the Associated Press
When Guantanamo Bay detainees challenge their designation as "enemy combatants," judges must receive all the evidence, not just what the military chose to present at the detainees' status review tribunals, a federal appeals court ruled Friday. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit rejected the Bush administration's plan to limit what judges and the detainees' attorneys can review when considering whether the Combatant Status Review Tribunals acted appropriately.
WORLD
July 17, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Sixteen Saudis from the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, arrived home and were immediately detained by authorities investigating possible terrorist connections, the official Saudi Press Agency reported. A total of 77 Saudis have now been returned from Guantanamo, Maj. Gen. Mansour Turki told the press agency. He said 53 remain at the U.S. military facility in Cuba. A Pentagon spokesman, Navy Cmdr. Jeffrey D. Gordon, confirmed that the detainees had been transferred.
NATIONAL
July 7, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The Pentagon said it had appealed a decision by a military judge to dismiss the case of Omar Ahmed Khadr, a Guantanamo Bay detainee accused of killing an American soldier in Afghanistan. It is the first time that the appeals process has been used since it was created by Congress in late 2006 to handle cases involving Guantanamo detainees.
NATIONAL
June 30, 2007 | David G. Savage and Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writers
In a surprise move, the Supreme Court agreed Friday to consider whether prisoners at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, had been wrongly held for years without a fair chance to plead their innocence. In a brief order before adjourning for the summer, the justices announced they would hear an appeal that in April they had refused to hear. The case asks whether "foreign citizens imprisoned indefinitely" by the U.S.
WORLD
June 28, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A man formerly held by the U.S. at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, was killed in a shootout with security agents in a restive North Caucasus republic, Russia's top security agency said. Ruslan Odizhev was killed amid gunfire that erupted when agents tried to arrest him and another man in Kabardino-Balkaria, a region near Chechnya that is beset with violence linked both to crime and to religious tensions, the Federal Security Service said in a statement.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2007 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
The White House postponed a meeting of the administration's top senior foreign and defense policy officials scheduled for today to debate the future of the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, terrorism detention center, but officials said the issue of whether to close the facility was likely to be discussed at a later date. The meeting was scheduled to help senior leaders decide whether the Guantanamo prison could be closed and its detainees moved to facilities in the U.S.
NATIONAL
June 17, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Inside of a week, a U.S. federal court, retired Gen. Colin L. Powell and two military judges assigned to the war-crimes tribunals here dealt serious blows to the Bush administration's efforts to detain and prosecute terrorism suspects. Some legal scholars and analysts predict more obstacles to trials for any of the 385 foreign prisoners at the U.S. military detention compound.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2007 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
Former Secretary of State Colin L. Powell on Sunday called for the closing of the Guantanamo Bay prison and a rethinking of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy he authored as head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The public comments represent Powell's effort to further distance himself from the Bush administration he once served.
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