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Guantanamo Naval Base

NATIONAL
June 17, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Inside of a week, a U.S. federal court, retired Gen. Colin L. Powell and two military judges assigned to the war-crimes tribunals here dealt serious blows to the Bush administration's efforts to detain and prosecute terrorism suspects. Some legal scholars and analysts predict more obstacles to trials for any of the 385 foreign prisoners at the U.S. military detention compound.
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NATIONAL
June 11, 2007 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
Former Secretary of State Colin L. Powell on Sunday called for the closing of the Guantanamo Bay prison and a rethinking of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy he authored as head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The public comments represent Powell's effort to further distance himself from the Bush administration he once served.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
A Senate panel took the first step Thursday toward again giving foreign prisoners held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the right to go to court and seek their freedom. On a mostly party-line vote of 11 to 8, the Democratic-controlled Judiciary Committee said it would restore the right of habeas corpus that had been taken away in recent years by the Bush administration and the Republican-controlled Congress. "Habeas corpus was recklessly undermined in last year's legislation," said Sen. Patrick J.
NATIONAL
June 7, 2007 | David G. Savage and Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writers
Despite new legal setbacks, the Pentagon is likely to press ahead with plans for military war-crimes trials at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, because they offer the only way to prosecute the terrorists who planned the Sept. 11 attacks, say military lawyers and legal analysts who support the Bush administration's efforts.
NATIONAL
June 5, 2007 | Carol J. Williams and Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writers
Military judges threw out war-crimes cases Monday against the only detainees here who have been indicted, in rulings that suggest the hastily reassembled military tribunals have no jurisdiction over any of Guantanamo's 380 prisoners. In separate hearings, an Army colonel and a Navy captain granted motions to dismiss the cases because the 2006 Military Commissions Act that Congress passed last year gave the tribunals jurisdiction only over "unlawful alien enemy combatants."
NATIONAL
May 31, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A Saudi Arabian detainee died Wednesday at Guantanamo Bay prison, and the U.S. military said he apparently committed suicide. Guards at the U.S. Navy base in southeast Cuba found the detainee in his cell unresponsive and not breathing, the military's Southern Command said in a statement. "They tried to save his life but he was pronounced dead," said Mario Alvarez, a Miami-based spokesman for the Southern Command.
NATIONAL
May 15, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A Navy lawyer sent a human rights lawyer a Valentine's Day card with Guantanamo Bay detainees' names and intelligence about them tucked inside, prosecutors said Monday. Lt. Cmdr. Matthew M. Diaz's actions endangered the lives of the detainees and American troops on the front line in the war on terrorism, prosecutor Lt. James Hoffman said during opening statements in Diaz's court-martial at Norfolk Naval Station.
NATIONAL
May 2, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The Supreme Court refused to stop the Bush administration from transferring a Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, detainee to his home country of Libya. Lawyers for the man argued that he faced torture at the hands of the Libyan government if sent there. Abu Abdul Rauf Zalita says he married an Afghan citizen and that after the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan, he and his pregnant wife fled to Pakistan, where he was handed over to U.S. authorities for a bounty. The U.S.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) introduced a measure Monday to force the Pentagon to close the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and move the trials of Al Qaeda suspects to the United States. But the Defense Department got another green light for those Guantanamo tribunals to continue, when the Supreme Court declined Monday to hear the appeal of two detainees who challenged the legality of the military commissions.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The New York City Bar says the Bush administration is trying to evade responsibility for problems at the Guantanamo Bay prison by falsely blaming defense lawyers for the trouble. The group's president leveled the criticism in a letter asking Atty. Gen. Alberto R. Gonzales to drop a Justice Department proposal to limit lawyers' access to the nearly 400 detainees.
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