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WORLD
December 21, 2007 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
Juma al-Dossari is returning to his life the way a photograph in a darkroom gradually takes shape on paper. He is home after surviving six years and more than a dozen suicide attempts as a U.S. prisoner at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
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WORLD
December 13, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. announced that it has sent 15 Guantanamo prisoners back to their homelands. The military transferred 13 men to Afghanistan and two to Sudan, the Pentagon said in a statement. Their names were not released. The U.S. has now sent about 485 prisoners to their native countries, where most have been subsequently released. About 290 men remain at the U.S. detention facility in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
WORLD
December 9, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
A turning point in the Bush administration's counter-terrorism strategy of indefinite confinement at the U.S. detention center here came on a balmy day in February, when two Afghans and three Tajiks were ferried across the bay, shackled and blindfolded, for their flights home. The men's departure reduced the detainee population to 385 -- meaning that of the 777 men brought here over six years as suspected security threats, more prisoners had left than remained.
WORLD
December 8, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
U.S. and British authorities reached an agreement to soon release four British residents from the Pentagon's prison for terrorism suspects in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, their lawyers said Friday. British Prime Minister Gordon Brown urged the release of the last five British detainees in August, soon after coming to power, pressing the Bush administration to satisfy a diplomatic appeal by its closest ally in the war in Iraq and the U.S.-declared war on terrorism.
NATIONAL
December 7, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
In the weeks after Sept. 11, Salim Ahmed Hamdan -- Osama bin Laden's driver -- helped the Al Qaeda leader evade capture and applauded his quest to destroy the United States, witnesses told a military panel here Thursday. Prosecutors seeking to prove that the Yemeni native should be considered an unlawful enemy combatant said that Hamdan had two surface-to-air missiles in his car when he was captured in southern Afghanistan in November 2001.
NATIONAL
December 5, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Despite sweeping measures to prevent suicides among the 305 prisoners here, a detainee slashed his throat with a sharpened fingernail recently and might have bled to death if guards hadn't rushed to his aid, officers disclosed here Tuesday. The apparent suicide attempt last month in a shower at maximum-security Camp 6 was one of dozens known to have occurred since prisoners were first brought to the military prison nearly six years ago.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
The rules governing war-crimes trials here require defense lawyers and prosecutors to inform each other of witnesses they will call and evidence they will present at the military commissions. But the vague guidance on the process known as discovery doesn't impose any obligation to make timely disclosures. Nor does it oblige the government to make its witnesses available to the defense for pretrial interviews. Unique to the tribunal system that is governed by neither U.S.
WORLD
November 13, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Nearly 50 flights to or from the U.S. military prison for terrorism suspects at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, passed through Spain's air space or landed in the country from 2002 until as recently as February, a report said. The Spanish government previously acknowledged only one such flight, insisting that it had not colluded with the CIA's program of "extraordinary rendition," in which terrorism suspects have been flown secretly to far-flung detention centers.
WORLD
November 7, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A federal appeals court Tuesday refused to block military commission proceedings against a Canadian detainee at Guantanamo Bay. Lawyers for Omar Khadr had asked the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to halt the case, in which Khadr is charged with murder for allegedly throwing a grenade that killed a Special Forces soldier in a firefight in Afghanistan. Khadr, who was 15 when he was captured in Afghanistan in 2002, also faces conspiracy and other charges.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2007 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
The FBI is quietly reconstructing the cases against Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and 14 other accused Al Qaeda leaders being held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, spurred in part by U.S. concerns that years of CIA interrogation have yielded evidence that is inadmissible or too controversial to present at their upcoming war crimes tribunals, government officials familiar with the probes said.
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