Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGuatemala Courts
IN THE NEWS

Guatemala Courts

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 1, 1994 | Associated Press
Guatemalans voted out the Congress and Supreme Court in an anti-corruption referendum that drew fewer than one in five voters to the polls. Opponents of the referendum called by President Ramiro de Leon Carpio said the low turnout showed the public did not support the proposed constitutional amendments. De Leon called the turnout "unfortunate" but said the vote was nonetheless a defeat for the "enemies of democracy."
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
April 25, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY -- Guatemala's highest court issued a ruling late Thursday that appears to have broken the complicated legal logjam in the case of former dictator Efrain Rios Montt, who is facing genocide charges in the slaughter of ethnic Maya during the country's civil war. The decision by the Constitutional Court appears to avert the possibility that prosecutors might have to start the trial from scratch, re-creating a case in which more than 100...
Advertisement
WORLD
April 25, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY -- Guatemala's highest court issued a ruling late Thursday that appears to have broken the complicated legal logjam in the case of former dictator Efrain Rios Montt, who is facing genocide charges in the slaughter of ethnic Maya during the country's civil war. The decision by the Constitutional Court appears to avert the possibility that prosecutors might have to start the trial from scratch, re-creating a case in which more than 100...
NEWS
February 1, 1994 | Associated Press
Guatemalans voted out the Congress and Supreme Court in an anti-corruption referendum that drew fewer than one in five voters to the polls. Opponents of the referendum called by President Ramiro de Leon Carpio said the low turnout showed the public did not support the proposed constitutional amendments. De Leon called the turnout "unfortunate" but said the vote was nonetheless a defeat for the "enemies of democracy."
NEWS
May 22, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
Things just went from bad to worse for former Guatemala dictator Gen. Efrain Rios Montt. The 85-year-old is already charged with human rights abuses committed during that country's 36-year civil war. This week a judge added a second genocide charge against him, the Associated Press reported. That's extraordinary. Rios Montt seized power in 1982 in a military coup. During his 17-month rule, troops carried out a "scorched earth" policy that wiped out hundreds of villages in the name of fighting leftist rebels.
WORLD
July 25, 2003 | From Associated Press
Violent protests in support of former dictator Efrain Rios Montt engulfed much of Guatemala's capital on Thursday, causing President Alfonso Portillo to call out the army to restore order. But the more than 5,000 demonstrators -- many wielding machetes and clubs -- ran unchecked, with police staying back to prevent more violence and the military apparently not heeding the president's call for troops. The U.S. Embassy, surrounded by protesters, closed as a precaution.
NEWS
November 10, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most striking feature of Sunday's presidential election, only the second time Guatemalans will have gone to the polls under an elected government, is not differences between the parties, or vicious rhetoric from the candidates. It is the death count. In Guatemala, negative campaigning means killing opponents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2003 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft is reconsidering a Clinton administration policy that was designed to make it easier for victims of domestic abuse to gain political asylum in the United States, a Justice Department spokesman confirmed Thursday. Officials insist that Ashcroft has not made up his mind, but women's groups and lobbyists for immigrants said they fear he will reverse the policy.
OPINION
June 6, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
When a Guatemalan court found the country's former dictator, Gen. Efrain Rios Montt, guilty of genocide last month, it was the first time a Latin American leader had been convicted of such a crime in his own country. The verdict was hailed as a victory not only for Guatemala's fragile courts but also for Latin America generally, where weak judges and fearful prosecutors have all too often failed to bring human rights abusers to justice. That triumph, however, is now at risk. Just days after Rios Montt was convicted, the trial court's verdict was thrown out on a procedural technicality by the country's Constitutional Court, which ordered the lower court to rehear all evidence presented after April 19, when the procedural mistake occurred.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|