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Guerrillas Afghanistan

NEWS
February 15, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Lt. Gen. Boris Gromov, commander of Soviet forces in Afghanistan, became the last Soviet soldier to leave the embattled country when he crossed into the Soviet border town of Termez at 9:55 a.m Moscow time today, the official Soviet news agency Tass reported. Today was the deadline for troop withdrawal under a U.N.-sponsored accord designed to end the nine-year Soviet intervention in Afghanistan.
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NEWS
February 16, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Flanked by guards posing for the television cameras, a gray-bearded Afghan rebel leader proclaimed here Wednesday that the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan was "one of the most unprecedented events of the last few centuries" and that it "defeated communism's philosophy all over the world as a whole."
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The top Soviet general in Afghanistan said Tuesday that once the pullout of his forces is completed by the Feb. 15 deadline, Moscow will no longer use its air power to support the Afghan government. The Soviet Union has been using air power increasingly since last fall to try to push back guerrilla forces besieging Afghan cities, and recently to help keep open a key highway from the Soviet border.
NEWS
April 20, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leader of the Muslim rebel faction that helped drive Afghan President Najibullah from power last week pledged not to take the capital by force, as the besieged new regime said Sunday for the first time that it was considering the rebels' demand that Kabul be ceded to a government drawn from the guerrillas.
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rebel commanders rejected an offer from Afghan President Najibullah to directly negotiate an end to their country's civil war, vowing to fight on to topple his Communist-style government. They also accused fundamentalist rebel chief Gulbuddin Hekmatyar of secretly plotting to form a coalition government with Najibullah and Gen. Shahnawaz Tanai, a former defense minister who defected in 1990.
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Insisting that the departure of Soviet troops is not a retreat or a defeat, the commander of Soviet forces in Afghanistan said Saturday that one-fourth of his troops will be withdrawn from this country before the May 29 summit meeting between President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev in Moscow. "We think this will make it possible to establish an atmosphere of trust at the summit," Lt. Gen. Boris Gromov declared. He said that by Aug.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through a decade of war, Gen. Abdul Rashid Dostam commanded the fiercest Afghan militia division, up to 40,000 heavily armed mercenaries known as the Jauzjan, who were used as storm troopers by the Soviet Red Army and Kabul's authoritarian regimes against a nationwide, U.S.-backed Islamic rebellion. Now, with peace at hand, Gen. Dostam is in open revolt against Afghanistan's strongman President Najibullah and the army commanders he once loyally served.
NEWS
November 13, 2001 | PAUL WATSON and MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Crowning four days of opposition victories, Northern Alliance forces entered this capital city without a fight today after thousands of Taliban troops defected or fled. Alliance soldiers overtook the Taliban army garrison in Kabul at 4 a.m., an opposition commander said.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Afghanistan's ruling Taliban movement repulsed two overnight opposition attacks, the Afghan Islamic Press, or AIP, reported. One attack came in northeastern Afghanistan when forces loyal to commander Ahmed Shah Masoud launched an offensive against Taliban positions 19 miles north of the town of Taloqan, AIP said. It said the Taliban repelled the opposition after five hours of fighting in which three Taliban and six opposition fighters were killed.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
A blistering battle north of this war-battered Afghan capital on Saturday left as many as 30 civilians dead and scores of fighters injured and forced hundreds of people to flee their homes. Opposition soldiers said 30 civilians were killed by Taliban jet fighters that pounded enemy territory in Parwan and Kapisa provinces, both north of Kabul. Because of the fighting and the remoteness of the area, it was impossible to confirm the report independently. "The bombardment was heavy.
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