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Guerrillas Afghanistan

NEWS
May 10, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Schools reopened in Kabul for the first time since March but few pupils attended for fear that the four-day cease-fire in the capital could break down. An official of the new Islamic government said some teachers also stayed away as hard-line guerrillas negotiated with Kabul's guerrilla rulers to try to break a deadlock preventing a permanent end to hostilities.
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NEWS
May 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Afghan Defense Minister Ahmed Shah Masoud, a moderate guerrilla leader who is now part of the ruling coalition in Kabul, vowed to prevent guerrilla hard-liner Gulbuddin Hekmatyar from launching another bid to gain power. Masoud's harsh comments came on the eve of the end of a three-day truce agreed to by the two factions. At least 73 people were killed earlier this week when Hekmatyar's forces bombarded Kabul with rockets fired from hills south of the city.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The men of Maulem Shah Mohammed's lost command sat in the ruins of King Amanullah's hillside guest house, waiting for lunch: a scorched vat of rice, a spent ammunition box of tea and a 50-gallon drum down to its last half-inch of lard. The commander's hands were frostbitten from the eight-day walk he and his 30 tattered fighters had made to claim the rubble of Paghman for their Muslim guerrilla faction. They were acting on orders more than two weeks old.
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of shellshocked civilians began fleeing the Afghan capital in panic Tuesday as the second consecutive day of heavy shelling by dissident Muslim guerrillas killed nearly two dozen men, women and children, closed the international airport and further paralyzed the struggling new government.
NEWS
May 5, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guerrilla commander Haidar Basir is the proud new owner of more than 50 long-range Scud missiles, identical to the Soviet-built weapons that Iraq fired into Israel last year. Basir claimed the missiles, along with tons of rocket fuel, on behalf of his pro-Iranian party when he and his men seized the fallen Afghan regime's strategic missile-launching facility in Kabul during the guerrillas' race to claim the capital April 25. But Basir hasn't seen his new missiles yet.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Samir died at 1 p.m. with rocket shrapnel in his head. He was in Bed No. 2 in the children's ward of Kabul's Indira Gandhi Hospital. But it hardly mattered that there was no oxygen on hand to save the 6-year-old boy. The hospital had no power, no medicine, no water and not even food for the half-dozen other children dying in the cots beside him. A few hours before, and several blocks away, another Afghan died a more dramatic death.
NEWS
April 28, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warring Muslim guerrilla factions blasted away at ancient forts, a martyrs' cemetery and apartment buildings Monday in the bloody urban battle to claim the capital, while a convoy carrying a coalition of moderate politicians and religious leaders was stalled in its efforts to fill Kabul's power vacuum.
NEWS
April 27, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just after a quiet sunrise Sunday in a valley awash with spring that the first rockets ripped through the Mogul palaces of Afghanistan's ancient kings. Then came the staccato cracks of a dozen assault rifles. The earth trembled when a tank opened fire.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebel commander Mohammed Tahir didn't have much of a strategy to fend off rival moujahedeen factions after he took the Afghan regime's main armory of weapons and ammunition Saturday morning without firing a shot. But somehow, it worked. "We were here first," Tahir said, explaining how he fended off the challenge of another guerrilla force loyal to fundamentalist leader Gulbuddin Hekmatyar and held the strategic facility for his own rebel leader, Commander Ahmed Shah Masoud, a moderate.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The night sky over Kabul exploded in celebration Saturday with millions of rounds of red, white and green tracer fire and machine-gun bursts after thousands of Muslim guerrillas took control of the capital in less than 24 hours. The takeover, marking the end of a 14-year guerrilla war against a failed authoritarian regime, came with a minimum of bloodshed and reprisals.
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