Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsGuerrillas Afghanistan
IN THE NEWS

Guerrillas Afghanistan

NEWS
April 30, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Samir died at 1 p.m. with rocket shrapnel in his head. He was in Bed No. 2 in the children's ward of Kabul's Indira Gandhi Hospital. But it hardly mattered that there was no oxygen on hand to save the 6-year-old boy. The hospital had no power, no medicine, no water and not even food for the half-dozen other children dying in the cots beside him. A few hours before, and several blocks away, another Afghan died a more dramatic death.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 28, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warring Muslim guerrilla factions blasted away at ancient forts, a martyrs' cemetery and apartment buildings Monday in the bloody urban battle to claim the capital, while a convoy carrying a coalition of moderate politicians and religious leaders was stalled in its efforts to fill Kabul's power vacuum.
NEWS
April 27, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just after a quiet sunrise Sunday in a valley awash with spring that the first rockets ripped through the Mogul palaces of Afghanistan's ancient kings. Then came the staccato cracks of a dozen assault rifles. The earth trembled when a tank opened fire.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebel commander Mohammed Tahir didn't have much of a strategy to fend off rival moujahedeen factions after he took the Afghan regime's main armory of weapons and ammunition Saturday morning without firing a shot. But somehow, it worked. "We were here first," Tahir said, explaining how he fended off the challenge of another guerrilla force loyal to fundamentalist leader Gulbuddin Hekmatyar and held the strategic facility for his own rebel leader, Commander Ahmed Shah Masoud, a moderate.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The night sky over Kabul exploded in celebration Saturday with millions of rounds of red, white and green tracer fire and machine-gun bursts after thousands of Muslim guerrillas took control of the capital in less than 24 hours. The takeover, marking the end of a 14-year guerrilla war against a failed authoritarian regime, came with a minimum of bloodshed and reprisals.
NEWS
April 25, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eleventh-hour efforts to forge a unified Islamic government to fill Kabul's deepening power vacuum apparently failed Friday as the fractious guerrilla political leadership in exile in Pakistan was unable to reach a compromise. Earlier in the day, the rival leaders of the moujahedeen, or holy warriors, had announced a complex formula to share power in the capital through a series of interim governments.
NEWS
April 25, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scene in Babur's Gardens on Friday, Afghanistan's official day of rest, hardly befit a city on the eve of destruction. With just 48 hours left before a deadline for surrender or war, the betting was as fast and furious as ever in the garden's daylong cockfights, a century-old tradition that is a fitting metaphor for a country so long at war. Old men sat in clumps nearby, betting on dice and cards.
NEWS
April 24, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talib the guerrilla leader found a mountainside Afghan army command bunker here Thursday. So he took it--tanks, ammo and all--without firing a single shot. He also got some broken bedsprings, a few mattresses, a sack of rice or two, a lot of blankets and a teapot. Talib thanked the soldiers, who shook his hand as they "surrendered" the bunker and left on long journeys for home.
NEWS
April 24, 1992 | From Associated Press
Radical guerrilla leader Gulbuddin Hekmatyar offered moderate rebels a compromise Thursday, saying he would accept an interim rebel council that would rule until elections within a year. Hekmatyar, who previously had demanded the immediate establishment of a strict Islamic state, also proposed that neither he nor his bitter rival, Ahmed Shah Masoud, serve on the council.
NEWS
April 22, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crumbling regime of ousted President Najibullah agreed Tuesday to yield "all powers of state" to a government of Muslim rebels, as the U.N. peace envoy to Afghanistan began an urgent dialogue with the first of the many guerrilla factions that are carving the nation into loose, autonomous coalitions.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|