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Guerrillas Cambodia

NEWS
August 1, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The recent mutiny against Khmer Rouge leader Pol Pot may mean the end of his personal leadership of the Communist guerrilla movement, but it could herald a fresh beginning for the fading Khmer Rouge--and perhaps the start of a new civil war in Cambodia. Remnants of the Maoist guerrilla group, who staged a dramatic purge last week of the man who directed one of this century's worst genocides, say they are starting over with a new name: the National Solidarity Party.
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NEWS
July 30, 1997 | From Associated Press
Huddled shoulder to shoulder, some on tiptoes, market vendors, shoppers and taxi drivers crowded around the TV monitor to look at the man blamed for the deaths of more than 1 million Cambodians. Boys and girls stood open-mouthed, eyeing the feeble, white-haired man--a bogeyman from horror stories suddenly become real. Those old enough to remember him cried out in amazement: "That's him! That's him!"
NEWS
July 29, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pol Pot, the notorious Khmer Rouge leader who presided over the deaths of more than 1 million Cambodians, was near tears as his former followers denounced him at a show trial in their jungle base camp, an American journalist said Monday. The sighting of the elusive Pol Pot was reported by Nate Thayer, a correspondent for the Far Eastern Economic Review magazine of Hong Kong. No Western journalist is known to have seen the enigmatic leader in 18 years.
NEWS
July 29, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pol Pot, the notorious Khmer Rouge leader who presided over the deaths of more than 1 million Cambodians, was near tears as his former followers denounced him at a show trial in their jungle base camp, an American journalist said Monday. The sighting of the elusive Pol Pot was reported by Nate Thayer, a correspondent for the Far Eastern Economic Review magazine of Hong Kong. No Western journalist is known to have seen the enigmatic leader in 18 years.
NEWS
July 2, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the television cameras rolling, Second Prime Minister Hun Sen bent his head to lay a fragrant wreath on the tiny grave of his firstborn son, who died at birth 21 years ago during the genocidal reign of the Khmer Rouge. The infant was delivered in a jungle hut outside Memot, a rubber-growing area two miles from the Vietnamese border where Hun Sen was then a Khmer Rouge cadre.
NEWS
June 26, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Persuading the remnants of the Khmer Rouge to hand over Pol Pot to an international tribunal could prove thorny, even if the former dictator is in fact a prisoner of the guerrillas he once commanded, sources here in the Cambodian capital said Wednesday. "The negotiations are apparently stalled," said a senior foreign observer.
NEWS
March 31, 1997 | From Reuters
The Khmer Rouge guerrilla movement condemned a deadly grenade attack on opposition demonstrators in this capital over the weekend that killed at least 12, and blamed it on Second Prime Minister Hun Sen. A Khmer Rouge spokesman said today on the guerrillas' clandestine radio that the group "would like to condemn severely" the attack on a protest led by opposition leader Sam Rainsy, which injured more than 100 people.
NEWS
September 29, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A breakaway faction of the Khmer Rouge has agreed to all government conditions for a peace agreement, including merging its troops into the national army, the government said. The guerrillas also agreed to drop their demand for senior military posts and autonomy for the territory now under their control, said First Prime Minister Norodom Ranariddh. The guerrillas, who on Aug.
NEWS
September 15, 1996 | Associated Press
King Norodom Sihanouk granted amnesty Saturday to a Khmer Rouge rebel leader widely blamed for involvement in the deaths of as many as 2 million people, including members of the royal family. Sihanouk apparently bowed to the wishes of the country's two co-premiers, who hope the pardon for Ieng Sary will help end two decades of civil war.
NEWS
September 10, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Breakaway Khmer Rouge leader Ieng Sary, sentenced to death for his role in the killing of more than 1 million Cambodians, said Monday that he had negotiated a cease-fire with the Cambodian government but that more talks were needed for a comprehensive settlement. Sary, foreign minister during the Khmer Rouge's 1975-79 rule of terror, initially appeared nervous before scores of reporters flown by helicopter to this northwestern town.
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