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NEWS
April 24, 1988
Leftist guerrillas in El Salvador battling the U.S.-backed government said they will prevent newly elected mayors from taking office and cited their recent assassination of one mayor. A message broadcast by the rebels' Radio Venceremos began with "a call to all mayors" and said: "The FMLN (Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front) will not permit you to exercise your functions."
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NEWS
March 6, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade ago, the search for Joaquin Villalobos required a bone-grinding jeep trip past hostile army checkpoints, across a mined riverbed and into the rough mountains of El Salvador. Even that might come to naught if one of Latin America's ablest and most ruthless guerrilla leaders refused to show his face to outsiders, as he often did for years at a time.
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NEWS
March 18, 1989 | From Reuters
Guerrillas in El Salvador recently received large new deliveries of Soviet Bloc weapons at a time they were expressing interest in a political settlement of their country's civil war, the United States said Friday. "They are additional arms, and in terms of the kind of arms, I believe they are of different kind," State Department spokesman Charles Redman told reporters. "There have been large deliveries.
NEWS
March 18, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this decade's first favorable election showing for Central American leftists, Salvadoran guerrillas-turned-politicians took control of the country's major city halls and positioned themselves to vie with the extreme right wing for control of the Legislative Assembly.
NEWS
November 13, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bush Administration officials on Sunday labeled the weekend offensive by leftist guerrillas in El Salvador "a move of desperation" that shows their weakness rather than new military strength.
NEWS
November 21, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Hundreds of leftist rebels attacked more than a dozen military positions across El Salvador on Tuesday, leaving at least 27 people dead and 141 wounded, authorities said. Rebel and military sources said the overnight clashes took place in the provinces of Morazan, Usulutan, Chalatenango, La Paz, San Salvador, Cuscatlan and La Libertad.
NEWS
April 15, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez charged the Soviet Union on Thursday with aiding leftist rebels in defiance of a Central American peace accord and urged President Reagan to press the issue with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev at their Moscow summit meeting late next month. Speaking to the annual meeting of the American Society of Newspaper Editors, Arias said he is "very disappointed" with Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hinting broadly at an extraordinary snub of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Wednesday that he is reluctant to change his Middle East peace proposals in response to Israeli demands because that would only produce other demands from the Arabs.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Spokesmen for Nicaragua's contras and for El Salvador's political exiles said Thursday that they are considering sending high-level representatives back to their respective countries to take part in a legal opposition under the terms of a preliminary peace accord signed by the presidents of the five Central American nations.
NEWS
August 14, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
President Jose Napoleon Duarte offered Thursday to meet with Salvadoran guerrillas to discuss a cease-fire, and he called on Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega to sit down with the contras fighting the Managua government on the same day. Duarte proposed holding the simultaneous talks on Sept. 15, the day Central America celebrates its independence from Spain. He did not make it clear whether the Nicaraguan talks are a condition for the Salvadoran meeting.
NEWS
March 14, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leftist presidential candidate Ruben Zamora, flanked by former guerrillas who until recently were waging civil war, gazed out Sunday over the smattering of red flags waving in this town's central plaza. "(My opponents) want to look at a past of suffering and explosion . . . a past that must be left behind," he told the small crowd. "(We) want to walk to the future . . . a future that we dreamed of, fought for, year after year."
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to put to rest an episode that devastated the credibility of El Salvador's former guerrillas and embarrassed the United Nations, U.N. officials certified Wednesday that the onetime rebels have finally surrendered the bulk of their weapons. An explosion three months ago in a hidden arms dump in Nicaragua revealed that the leftist guerrillas, despite their assurances to the contrary, had hidden tons of weapons, including antiaircraft missiles, in violation of U.N.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With great fanfare and even a few tears, El Salvador's leftist guerrillas six months ago turned in their weapons and formed a legal political party as part of landmark peace accords that ended this country's savage civil war. Now the former guerrillas stand accused of having deliberately lied when they said they were disarming.
NEWS
April 2, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two army officers convicted in the 1989 murders of six Jesuit priests, their cook and her daughter were released from prison Thursday as part of a new blanket amnesty sponsored by President Alfredo Cristiani. In response to U.S. pressure, however, government officials now say the amnesty, decreed last month for all Salvadorans guilty of war crimes, will not be granted to leftist guerrillas who killed U.S. servicemen during the conflict. The officers convicted in the Jesuits' murders, Col.
NEWS
March 16, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The watershed U.N-sponsored investigation into the brutalities of El Salvador's civil war paints a chilling picture of organized, systematic violence conducted by a network of military officials and right-wing death squads bent on destroying any and all enemies.
NEWS
January 5, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hit with a firestorm of protest over delays in purging El Salvador's armed forces of their worst human rights abusers, President Alfredo Cristiani promised Monday to remove more officers from duty. Warned by both Washington and the United Nations that he must carry out a complete purge, Cristiani sent two special envoys to New York to inform top U.N. officials of his plans to fire or transfer dozens of officers.
NEWS
December 14, 1992 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forty-eight hours before the formal end to El Salvador's civil war, leftist guerrillas, government officials and mediators were locked in intense negotiations Sunday over important political reforms including long-term security for former rebel fighters. The brinkmanship comes even as U.S. Vice President Dan Quayle and other regional leaders prepare to attend Tuesday's ceremony in San Salvador marking the conclusion of 12 years of war between rebels and U.S.-backed forces.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One by one, men like veteran guerrilla Manuel de Jesus Lopez Najarro are putting down their guns and going home. The separation of fighter from weapon is a painful one, Lopez says, like losing a hand. But it's time, time to move on and join a battered society struggling to recover from 12 years of civil war. Lopez is one of approximately 6,000 rebels who have been demobilized since the signing in January of U.N.
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