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February 22, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peace talks between southern Mexican rebels and the government began Monday as local antipathy toward the Indian guerrillas showed itself in threats toward nuns in a nearby town occupied during a New Year's uprising. About 200 demonstrators in Altamirano, a county seat about 60 miles from the talks here, on Sunday had given the St. Vincent de Paul nurse nuns a 2 p.m. Monday deadline to evacuate their hospital, threatening to burn it down if they did not.
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NEWS
June 6, 2001 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before his new movie, "Dust," has had its premiere, Milcho Manchevski has been asked whether the gunslinging American frontier character Luke--who gets caught up in a 1903 Balkan uprising--symbolizes NATO. The answer is that he doesn't--not quite, anyway.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | STAN YARBRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leftist guerrillas excluded from this week's first meetings to rewrite the Colombian constitution managed, nevertheless, to raise their bloody objection to the assembly. Stepped-up actions by two guerrilla groups have resulted in the deaths of at least 47 people since the leftist attacks began Monday, hours before the opening of the constitutional assembly.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A right-wing politician who was a former president of the Salvadoran Supreme Court was gunned down in his car at a busy intersection Tuesday. Francisco Jose Guerrero, 64, a leader of the conservative National Conciliation Party, was ambushed at mid-morning and shot in the chest, according to army and hospital officials. He died minutes later at a local hospital.
NEWS
January 2, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Afghanistan's armed rivals rang in 1994 with the heaviest fighting in Kabul in more than six months, showering hundreds of rocket and artillery shells onto the divided, battered capital Saturday despite a cease-fire signed a week ago. The two main hospitals in the city reported that eight dead and 250 injured had been brought in since the bombardment began at dawn, the British news agency Reuters reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1995
The Iraqi situation continues to be extremely worrisome, for reasons that are at once obvious and in other respects perhaps a little less glaring. On the utterly notorious side, Baghdad itself manages to keep in the headlines, whether in refusing to release two American businessmen who strayed over the Kuwaiti border last month or in rejecting Sunday the U.N. compromise proposal to partially lift international sanctions against the Iraqi sale of oil.
NEWS
December 14, 1985 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Guerrilla leaders announced Friday that they will take no offensive military action during the Christmas and New Year holidays and urged the government to do the same. But an army spokesman said the military will not agree to a cease-fire, as it did last year following highly publicized peace talks with the guerrillas. "For us, there are no vacations," an army officer said, asking not to be identified by name. "At no moment will we refrain from the pursuit of terrorists."
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Marxist-led guerrillas broke off peace talks with the government of President Jose Napoleon Duarte on Thursday and announced a new military campaign in response to the killing of a human rights leader. "Faced with the escalating wave of repression, we have decided not to participate in the talks with the government regarding a cease-fire or other aspects of the regional peace accord, scheduled to be held in Mexico City Oct. 30 to Nov.
NEWS
December 29, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leftist rebels holed up in the Japanese ambassador's residence here freed 20 more of their VIP hostages Saturday as the guerrillas and government appeared to move closer to a negotiated end to the 11-day siege. "We have made progress in resolving this grave incident," Education Minister Domingo Palermo, the government negotiator, declared after the hostages trooped from the white-columned residence.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Increasing ethnic violence has taken scores of lives and shattered the calm of Senegal, long admired as one of Africa's most tranquil and homogeneous countries. The violence is centered in a region known as the Casamance, which is geographically and culturally isolated from the rest of the country and has nurtured separatist sentiment for decades. Since April, at least 76 people--civilians, guerrillas and government soldiers--have been killed and hundreds injured in the Casamance.
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