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Guerrillas Guatemala

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NEWS
July 5, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Central Intelligence Agency trained Guatemalan guerrillas in the early 1980s at a ranch near Veracruz, Mexico, owned by drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero, one of the murderers of U.S. drug agent Enrique Camarena, according to a Drug Enforcement Administration report made public in Los Angeles.
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NEWS
June 24, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three generations of the Lopez family of San Antonio Huista in Guatemala's northwest highlands risked their lives for Marxist rebels as union organizers, urban militia members and guerrilla fighters. Wednesday, more than two years after the Guatemalan civil war ended, family members broke with that past by demanding that the attorney general investigate five former guerrilla leaders for the killings of two Lopez youths and a comrade.
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NEWS
January 28, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faint prospects for an end to Central America's longest war are flickering again following an agreement by Guatemalan officials and guerrillas to renew peace talks after months of bitter stalemate. For the first time in the sporadic efforts to end Guatemala's civil war, the United Nations will take an active role as moderator between the two sides as part of an agreement reached here this month.
NEWS
June 21, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 15 years, Ana Castellanos lied and deceived. Sometimes she passed herself off as a nun. Once, she rented a room from the sister of two army colonels and eavesdropped on their conversations while she helped her landlady serve coffee and cookies. Her mission: gathering information to pass on to Guatemalan guerrillas. She could not make friends, much less form a stable relationship. She cut herself off from her family, for their safety and for hers.
NEWS
May 15, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peace in Central America's last guerrilla war once again seems a distant, fleeting goal after talks between the Guatemalan government and leftist rebels broke down. With each side accusing the other of intransigence, the government and the guerrillas failed to achieve even a modicum of progress as they held a third round of negotiations here last week. The talks were aimed at ending a war that has claimed about 100,000 lives in the last 32 years.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | Reuters
Eight Guatemalan soldiers were killed and 15 wounded Wednesday in an ambush by leftist rebels in the southwestern department of San Marcos, near Mexico, a radio report said. Military spokesmen were not immediately able to confirm the report.
NEWS
May 18, 1989
Election outcomes in Denver and Seattle on Tuesday reflect the fact that the two western cities are on opposite sides of economic cycles. Business is decidedly cool in Denver, hot in Seattle. In both places, however, the voters made sensible decisions that seem to symbolize an underlying confidence in the future of their regional economic centers. Denverites approved construction of a new $2 billion international airport 17 miles northeast of downtown. With a 62.7% yes vote, they overrode objections that the depressed economy does not warrant such a massive investment.
NEWS
November 6, 1987 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writers
In an unexpected move, Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega agreed Thursday to indirect negotiations with U.S.-backed Nicaraguan rebels to end six years of war. The decision, announced to meet the first deadline of a Central American peace accord, was the Sandinistas' biggest concession of the war. It was a tacit recognition of the Contra insurgency. Managua had refused to deal with the Contras, insisting they were under the control of the United States, their creators.
NEWS
April 19, 1988
Two of four exiles who returned to Guatemala after seven years in exile were arrested at Guatemala City's international airport and accused by the government of maintaining links with leftist guerrillas, officials said. Rigoberta Menchu and Rolando Castillo Montalvo, members of the Unitary Representation of the Guatemalan Opposition, were taken away for interrogation. Two other exiles, former advisers of a now non-existing union, apparently had no problems entering the country.
NEWS
November 9, 1996 | Times Wire Services
Guatemala has agreed to resume peace talks with leftist rebels after the leader of a guerrilla group linked to a kidnapping agreed to step out of the negotiations. The U.N.-sponsored talks, which had been running smoothly for months, were abruptly suspended Oct. 28 after rebel commander Rafael Augusto Valdizon was arrested on suspicion of kidnapping a member of an influential family. Police briefly jailed Valdizon but let him go in return for the freeing of 86-year-old Olga Alvarado de Novella.
NEWS
December 29, 1996 | From Associated Press
Four rebel leaders stepped off a jet called "The Wings of Peace" here Saturday, returning from exile to a city they once hoped to capture. A military band played a popular tune, and hundreds of rebel supporters cheered as aging guerrilla commanders Pablo Monsanto, Rolando Moran, Carlos Gonzalez and Jorge Rosal arrived at Guatemala's international airport. "We are thrilled to return to Guatemala and to finally achieve peace," Monsanto said. "I hope we will have a country with justice."
NEWS
December 23, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Guatemalans prepare to formally end 35 years of civil war by signing a peace pact Sunday, they strongly disagree about whether the accords negotiated over five years and two administrations will correct the injustice and poverty that originally caused Latin America's oldest guerrilla conflict. Negotiated in six parts--one of them, agricultural policy, was discussed for more than a year--the agreement was designed to provide peaceful solutions to a war that has cost more than 100,000 lives.
NEWS
December 5, 1996 | From Associated Press
Guatemalan rebels and the government signed a cease-fire Wednesday that they hope will end Central America's longest civil war, a 35-year conflict that has killed 140,000 people. The cease-fire is one of three accords to be signed in Europe over six days, leading to a final peace pact signing Dec. 29 in Guatemala City. "With this agreement we sign today, the weapons will be silenced forever," rebel commander Rolando Moran said at Oslo City Hall.
NEWS
November 13, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signing an accord next month to end 35 years of civil war in Guatemala may well prove easier than keeping the peace after Latin America's longest rebellion ends, analysts warned Tuesday. The day after the government and guerrillas announced in Chile and Mexico, respectively, that the peace agreement will be signed Dec. 29, experts who have been following negotiations closely took a hard look at whether the accords will bring the "lasting peace" that both sides have promised.
NEWS
November 12, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING and EVA VERGARA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guatemala has reached a peace agreement to end Latin America's longest civil war, Guatemalan President Alvaro Arzu and the country's rebels announced separately Monday. The accord ushers in "a final period" of a 35-year war that has taken more than 100,000 lives, and it will be signed Dec. 29 in Guatemala City, Arzu told a summit of Ibero-American presidents meeting here. Later in the day, the Guatemalan guerrillas and the U.N.
NEWS
November 9, 1996 | Times Wire Services
Guatemala has agreed to resume peace talks with leftist rebels after the leader of a guerrilla group linked to a kidnapping agreed to step out of the negotiations. The U.N.-sponsored talks, which had been running smoothly for months, were abruptly suspended Oct. 28 after rebel commander Rafael Augusto Valdizon was arrested on suspicion of kidnapping a member of an influential family. Police briefly jailed Valdizon but let him go in return for the freeing of 86-year-old Olga Alvarado de Novella.
NEWS
November 12, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING and EVA VERGARA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Guatemala has reached a peace agreement to end Latin America's longest civil war, Guatemalan President Alvaro Arzu and the country's rebels announced separately Monday. The accord ushers in "a final period" of a 35-year war that has taken more than 100,000 lives, and it will be signed Dec. 29 in Guatemala City, Arzu told a summit of Ibero-American presidents meeting here. Later in the day, the Guatemalan guerrillas and the U.N.
NEWS
March 6, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Nine people have been killed or kidnaped in this mountain town in the last three months, in a wave of violence that residents and human right workers say stems from an army counterinsurgency campaign. Seven schoolteachers and two bus drivers have fled the town in recent weeks after the army circulated a list, said to have been taken from guerrillas, bearing the names of 192 people.
NEWS
October 31, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olga Alvarado de Novella is both a symbol of the oligarchy that once ran Guatemala in complicity with brutal military dictators and a frail, 86-year-old, wheelchair-bound woman. The first characteristic led to her kidnapping more than two months ago. And although she is now free, the second has put her at the center of a controversy that threatens to derail peace talks to end Latin America's longest civil war.
NEWS
October 31, 1994 | EDWARD ORLEBAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A U.S. woman's three-week hunger strike here to protest what she claims is the illegal detention of her guerrilla husband is putting a strain on Guatemala's relations with the United States. Jennifer Harbury, a 43-year-old Harvard Law School graduate who married guerrilla commander Efrain Bamaca in 1991, says she will continue her protest until her husband, missing since a battle in March, 1992, is handed over to the courts.
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