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Guerrillas Namibia

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NEWS
April 5, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
South Africa angrily vowed late Tuesday night to pull out of the United Nations' plan for Namibian independence "within the next few hours" unless the U.N. takes urgent action to force armed rebels in northern Namibia to abide by the peace accord and retreat to their bases in Angola. The South-West Africa People's Organization, which sent as many as 1,000 guerrillas into Namibia four days ago, "must now face up to the realities," South Africa's foreign minister, Roelof F.
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NEWS
November 13, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 23 years, the guerrillas of the South-West Africa People's Organization fought a bush war to wrest control of Namibia from South African colonizers and plant the principles of Karl Marx deeply in the sandy soil of the sparsely populated territory. But today, as SWAPO sits on the verge of realizing its dream in Namibia's first free and democratic elections, the rhetoric of war has given way to the practicalities of politics.
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NEWS
April 7, 1989
Namibian security forces fought guerrillas in the northern part of the territory for the sixth day as South Africa, Angola and Cuba planned emergency talks this weekend to try to salvage the U.N.-sponsored plan for Namibian independence from South Africa. Representatives of the three nations are to meet Saturday near Windhoek, the Namibian capital, along with American and Soviet observers.
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South African allegations that Namibian guerrillas were illegally moving into northern Namibia from Angola were based on phony U.N. messages, a spokesman for the U.N. peacekeeping force in Namibia said. Pretoria had said the alleged incursions threatened to disrupt next week's elections that are a step toward independence from South Africa.
NEWS
July 29, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
South African-led forces in Namibia reported Tuesday that they killed 190 Namibian insurgents and Angolan troops in two major clashes in southern Angola. Diplomats here said the incidents could represent the start of a sharp escalation in the prolonged confrontation between Pretoria and Angola's Marxist government.
NEWS
April 8, 1989 | From United Press International
The South African-appointed government of Namibia declared the U.N. timetable for the territory's independence effectively suspended Friday, citing a week of fierce border clashes between guerrillas and security forces that killed more than 280 people. Officials said more paramilitary troops had been activated to guard against reported guerrilla movements on farmland owned by whites. They said a curfew would be reimposed on the northern Ovambo region where the fighting erupted.
NEWS
April 2, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
South Africa threatened Saturday to expel a large U.N. peacekeeping force on its first day of work in Namibia after charging that guerrillas entering from Angola had clashed with Namibian police as a formal cease-fire went into effect, leaving 38 insurgents and two police officers dead. Roelof F. (Pik) Botha, South Africa's foreign minister, called the clash a "flagrant violation" of international agreements. He said that if the U.N.
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South African allegations that Namibian guerrillas were illegally moving into northern Namibia from Angola were based on phony U.N. messages, a spokesman for the U.N. peacekeeping force in Namibia said. Pretoria had said the alleged incursions threatened to disrupt next week's elections that are a step toward independence from South Africa.
NEWS
April 4, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of armed guerrillas who infiltrated Namibia, touching off bloody fighting and threatening this African territory's hopes for independence, misunderstood the United Nations' peace process and thought they could return home with U.N. protection as victors of the war, South African officials and captured rebels said Monday.
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | From Associated Press
Clashes between two political factions vying to lead Namibia into independence left two people dead and at least 30 injured, officials and news reports said Monday. A 27-year-old man was clubbed to death when he and four friends stopped at a small shop in the northern town of Oshakati on Saturday, said Gerhard Roux, spokesman for Namibia's adminstrator, Louis Pienaar.
NEWS
September 15, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Sam Nujoma, the black nationalist leader of Namibia's guerrillas, returned home Thursday after 30 years in exile to the tumultuous welcome of thousands amid heightened fears that his life is in danger. Only two days after Nujoma's most senior white adviser was assassinated, apparently by right-wing extremists, Nujoma stepped down from a chartered Boeing 767 jet to lead his South-West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO) in U.N.
NEWS
September 12, 1989
Two top-ranking officials of the South-West Africa People's Organization returned to Namibia from exile in Angola. They are expected to be joined later in the week by Sam Nujoma, leader of the once-outlawed guerrilla movement. Secretary General Andimba Toivo ja Toivo and national chairman David Meroro arrived at Windhoek on a flight from Luanda. "Home, sweet home," Ja Toivo said after kissing the tarmac. "It is very sweet to be back."
NEWS
September 2, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Theo-Ben Gurirab, a young teacher with dreams of black liberation, stuffed some carefully falsified identity papers into his pocket 27 years ago and stole onto an outbound train just ahead of the South African authorities. Once outside Namibia's borders, he earned a master's degree at an American university, married an American fashion merchandiser--and helped guide one of Africa's bloodiest guerrilla wars.
NEWS
August 12, 1989 | From Reuters
Gunmen have attacked U.N. troops for the first time since they arrived to police Namibia's progress toward independence, and the United Nations on Friday condemned the assaults as terrorism. A commercial security guard was killed when unidentified gunmen threw grenades and fired guns from a vehicle at a U.N. post in the northern Namibian town of Outjo. A similar attack, in which no one was injured, was made on an Outjo military compound where Kenyan troops are billeted.
NEWS
July 5, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
A group of 153 men, women and children held captive by the Namibian guerrilla organization SWAPO flew to Windhoek on Tuesday under the terms of an independence plan for the South African-run territory. They said they were among about 2,000 dissidents imprisoned and tortured by the South-West Africa People's Organization during its guerrilla war to gain independence for Namibia. SWAPO leaders say they held only 201 dissidents and have released them all.
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