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Guerrillas Northern Ireland

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NEWS
October 27, 1988
Guerrillas in Northern Ireland shot and killed a police officer and wounded another in an ambush, and a car bomb killed a post office manager outside Belfast's main postal sorting office, police said. No group immediately claimed responsibility for the attacks, which occurred 70 miles apart and within minutes of each other, around 7 p.m. The police officers had just come off duty and were traveling to Enniskillen in County Fermanagh when their private car was raked with gunfire.
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NEWS
January 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Police in Ireland said they discovered two rudimentary but potentially lethal bombs that they linked to Continuity IRA, one of the dissident republican groups opposed to the Northern Ireland peace process. The devices were part of a haul confiscated in a van at a roadside checkpoint in County Tipperary on Sunday evening. Police were questioning the driver, a 39-year-old man from Limerick.
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NEWS
December 19, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
The province's shaky peace process was given a boost Friday when one of Northern Ireland's most ruthless paramilitary groups surrendered a cache of weapons in the first such hand-over in 30 years of sectarian violence.
NEWS
December 19, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
The province's shaky peace process was given a boost Friday when one of Northern Ireland's most ruthless paramilitary groups surrendered a cache of weapons in the first such hand-over in 30 years of sectarian violence.
NEWS
April 23, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
The British government has blocked a bid by the Northern Ireland families of three IRA guerrillas shot to death by British commandos in Gibraltar two years ago to take legal action over the killings. The relatives had sought to claim damages from the British Defense Ministry for what they said were unlawful killings of the three Irish Republican Army activists. The three were slain in March, 1988, by British commandos who believed they were about to set off a car bomb.
NEWS
January 17, 1988
Two British soldiers and a Roman Catholic man have been shot to death, the first fatalities blamed on sectarian terrorists in Northern Ireland in 1988. Police said Capt. Timothy David Armstrong, 29, a member of the Ulster Defense Regiment, a locally recruited British army unit, was killed on a Belfast street. A second member of the regiment, William J. Stewart, 23, was fatally wounded near Coalisland, 35 miles west of Belfast.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | from Reuters
Protestant guerrillas killed a pregnant Roman Catholic woman in her bedroom Sunday, but left her five children unharmed. In a telephone message to a radio station, the outlawed Ulster Volunteer Force admitted murdering Kathleen O'Hagan. O'Hagan, 38, who was six months pregnant, was killed when gunmen broke into her house overnight in a rural area known for its hard-line support of unification with Ireland.
NEWS
April 23, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
The British government has blocked a bid by the Northern Ireland families of three IRA guerrillas shot to death by British commandos in Gibraltar two years ago to take legal action over the killings. The relatives had sought to claim damages from the British Defense Ministry for what they said were unlawful killings of the three Irish Republican Army activists. The three were slain in March, 1988, by British commandos who believed they were about to set off a car bomb.
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Irish Republican Army gunmen firing heavy machine guns raked an armored, unmarked police car in the village of Belleek, Northern Ireland, killing one officer and seriously wounding a second. The Royal Ulster Constabulary said the two men were driving down the main street of the village, where they had an appointment. Killed was Constable Michael Marshall, 25. The IRA claimed responsibility shortly after the attack.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | Reuters
Three IRA gunmen burst into the home of a Protestant man Wednesday night and shot him to death in front of his wife and daughter, police said. The Irish Republican Army, fighting to end British rule in Northern Ireland, said its guerrillas shot the man in the living room of his home in the village of Magheralin, near the border with the Irish Republic. They said he was closely involved with pro-British groups.
NEWS
September 21, 1989
The names of up to 75 Irish Republican Army suspects may have been leaked by rogue Northern Ireland police and troops to Protestant killer gangs, a member of a nationalist party said in Belfast. "It seems now that this is never-ending," Seamus Mallon of the Social Democratic and Labor Party said after a constituent was sent a list of suspects and the death threat.
NEWS
August 11, 1989
Five people accused of working to develop anti-helicopter missiles for the Irish Republican Army were indicted in Boston on federal charges of conspiring to violate regulations on arms exports. Investigators say the five, including a computer scientist, were working for the Provisional IRA, the guerrilla wing of the nationalist group fighting to end British rule in Northern Ireland.
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