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Guerrillas Zaire

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NEWS
November 3, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearful of growing chaos and a widening war, the United Nations safely evacuated the last international aid workers from this embattled city Saturday after bands of rebel fighters backed by Rwandan government soldiers routed the Zairian army and captured the key border enclave. The fall of Goma, and the emergency withdrawal of about 130 terrified expatriates by road to nearby Rwanda, mean that no U.N.
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NEWS
May 19, 1997 | From Associated Press
Beaten bloody, prodded by kicks and lashes with an ammunition belt, the man closed his eyes, spread out his arms and cried, "They are going to shoot me." Seconds later, a rebel fighter did, blasting four or five bullets into the man's back with an AK-47. Face twisting, the man fell to his knees in the dusty back alley, then collapsed. Witnesses said another man was shot to death in a similar manner Sunday and that a stray bullet killed a boy looking on.
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NEWS
April 22, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Rebels blocked aid workers from entering Rwandan Hutu refugee camps near the eastern Zaire city of Kisangani, saying they acted to restore order after local Zairians, angered by the killing of six villagers, began looting aid supplies and stoning foreigners. The identity of the killers was not known, but residents blamed Rwandan Hutu refugees. The rebel action further slowed U.N. efforts to move the estimated 100,000 refugees back to their homeland.
NEWS
May 19, 1997 | BOB DROGIN and MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Laurent Kabila's victorious rebel army moved to restore order and consolidate authority across this still-tense capital Sunday on a day marked by jubilation in the streets but marred by looting and revenge killings. A day after rebels first captured the city, thousands of reinforcements poured in on trucks or marched in long columns past wildly cheering and dancing crowds who lined streets and welcomed them as liberators. Kabila's name was chalked on roads and walls.
NEWS
April 25, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As rebels tarry to the east and the president languishes in his palace, the 5 million people of Kinshasa wait and wonder: How will their drama play out? After six months of civil war in which the government's forces mainly just melted away, rebel leader Laurent Kabila and his guerrilla fighters are headed for the capital of this vast central African country. They aim to claim their greatest prize and wrest power from President Mobutu Sese Seko--of this almost everyone feels certain.
NEWS
March 4, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Rebel forces trying to overthrow Zaire's government said they were closing in on Kisangani--the last major government stronghold in eastern Zaire--and would take it within the week. Mbuyi Tshikombo, a spokesman for the Alliance of Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Congo-Zaire, said the rebels were less than 14 miles from the city of about 300,000 people.
NEWS
March 17, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stunning capture by rebel forces of Zaire's third-largest city was a humiliating setback for President Mobutu Sese Seko's increasingly embattled regime and sets the stage for assaults on other key cities, including the capital. The rebel triumph Saturday at Kisangani means the anti-Mobutu insurgents convincingly control more than one-fifth of one of Africa's largest nations, including every major town and airport in the vast eastern region.
NEWS
March 29, 1997 | From Associated Press
Zairian rebels said Friday that they had seized a town on the Zambian border and were poised to capture the last government stronghold in eastern Zaire. They took Kasenga, 135 miles northeast of Lubumbashi, the capital of the mineral-rich Shaba province, rebel spokesman Nyembwe Kazadi said. The rebels vowed to continue their westward offensive in their bid to topple the regime of ailing President Mobutu Sese Seko.
NEWS
March 28, 1997 | From Reuters
Zaire's rebels agreed to talks with President Mobutu Sese Seko's shaky regime Thursday but successfully resisted pressure to first accept a cease-fire. A two-day summit of African leaders on the Zaire crisis ended with a statement calling for immediate negotiations between the warring parties. Five months into their revolt, rebel leader Laurent Kabila's disciplined fighters control about a quarter of Zaire.
NEWS
May 3, 1997 | Reuters
Zairian rebels who abducted 52 sick Rwandan Hutu refugee children from a hospital kept them in a container van without food or water and beat some before releasing them five days later, U.N. agencies said Friday. The Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said it had asked the Tutsi-dominated rebels, who face growing charges of human rights abuses and violence against the refugees, to explain the abduction and mistreatment. U.N.
NEWS
May 19, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wilfred Batumike paused Sunday after explaining how he and the 100 boys and men in his rebel unit marched across this immense country on foot to topple dictator Mobutu Sese Seko. "No, there was one day when we were taken by trucks," the 20-year-old medic admitted. They lived off the land, or on food given by villagers along the way. "But never enough," he said shyly. "Sometimes I passed a week without eating." They were not paid. Nor do they expect to be.
NEWS
May 18, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight months ago, virtually no one outside a small group of Africa specialists had a clue who Laurent Kabila was. The 59-year-old revolutionary was a forgotten figure, waging a seemingly futile insurgency in the mountains of eastern Zaire. Today, Kabila is in the international spotlight, hailed by Zairians as the man who unyoked their exhausted country from the 32-year dictatorship of Mobutu Sese Seko--but even now, few can honestly say they know who Laurent Kabila really is. Marxist fossil?
NEWS
May 16, 1997 | BOB DROGIN and MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Defiant to the end, President Mobutu Sese Seko flew home to this beleaguered capital Thursday as Laurent Kabila's guerrilla army came within striking distance of the city's airport and an attack appeared imminent.
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | BOB DROGIN and MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A last-chance effort to broker peace talks between warring sides in the seven-month Zairian civil war collapsed Wednesday night, setting the stage for a full-scale rebel assault on the capital, Kinshasa. United Nations special envoy Mohamed Sahnoun said rebel leader Laurent Kabila had refused to attend a second and final round of face-to-face talks with the embattled Zairian president, Mobutu Sese Seko, aboard this South African naval ship.
NEWS
May 8, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Riding in a bulletproof Cadillac flanked by army trucks bristling with machine guns, President Mobutu Sese Seko made his way to the airport and out of Zaire on Wednesday. As he flew away, perhaps for the last time, church sources alleged a massacre of civilians by Mobutu's troops. Reports reaching Kinshasa by radio said as many as 200 civilians have been killed, among them 10 Red Cross workers.
NEWS
May 6, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As rebel forces close in on this capital, a diplomatic deal is nearing completion to allow President Mobutu Sese Seko to retire in dignity and rebel leader Laurent Kabila to take over a transitional government without a battle, said a diplomatic source familiar with the negotiations Monday.
NEWS
May 5, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long-delayed peace talks Sunday between Zairian President Mobutu Sese Seko and rebel leader Laurent Kabila failed to produce the anticipated results: Mobutu did not resign, and fighting did not stop. Mobutu's refusal to give up power after 32 years, despite seven months of military defeats for his army and the approach of a victorious rebel force now at his doorstep, means the insurgents will fight on, Kabila said after the meeting.
NEWS
February 27, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Armed troops loyal to Zaire's dictator Mobutu Sese Seko backed down from a siege of the legislature but later surrounded the home of the country's interim leader, Archbishop Monsengwo Pasinya. The soldiers appeared to be trying to intimidate the interim government before a meeting between the strongman and legislative leaders.
NEWS
May 5, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long-delayed peace talks Sunday between Zairian President Mobutu Sese Seko and rebel leader Laurent Kabila failed to produce the anticipated results: Mobutu did not resign, and fighting did not stop. Mobutu's refusal to give up power after 32 years, despite seven months of military defeats for his army and the approach of a victorious rebel force now at his doorstep, means the insurgents will fight on, Kabila said after the meeting.
NEWS
May 3, 1997 | Reuters
Zairian rebels who abducted 52 sick Rwandan Hutu refugee children from a hospital kept them in a container van without food or water and beat some before releasing them five days later, U.N. agencies said Friday. The Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said it had asked the Tutsi-dominated rebels, who face growing charges of human rights abuses and violence against the refugees, to explain the abduction and mistreatment. U.N.
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